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Table saw blade size

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Forum topic by 12strings posted 02-11-2013 04:21 PM 1232 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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12strings

419 posts in 1070 days


02-11-2013 04:21 PM

My fairly cheap table saw has a 10” blade in it. But I went over to my friend’s house and he had a really old huge cabinet saw with what looked like a 7” blade.

Is there any advantage to using a smaller blade on a table saw?

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!


24 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2334 days


#1 posted 02-11-2013 04:26 PM

blade cost would be 1 advantage.

a disadvantage would be:
1. depth of cut
2. quality of cut (to some degree, and more noticeable on some cuts than others), as the moving speed of the cutting teeth is lower than on a 10” blade

I suppose if you have specific cuts that require a specific blade geometry (flat ground teeth for example) and you need to make shallow cuts and don’t want to invest in a full 10” blade, that would be a valid option.

If you have blades from your circular saw that you want to use in your TS – that would be an option.

Other than that, I see no reason to use 7” blades in a 10” capable saw

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4341 posts in 1734 days


#2 posted 02-11-2013 04:30 PM

7” are not as common and probably more difficult to find and with less variety

-- Bert

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2334 days


#3 posted 02-11-2013 04:35 PM

Bert – 7 1/4 blades are very common – available in all hardware stores for circular saws. come in a variety of configuration (ripping/combo/cross cut/laminates/matal/etc)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View 1stmistake's profile

1stmistake

13 posts in 857 days


#4 posted 02-11-2013 04:45 PM

Matthias has a short bit about using skilsaw blades in a table saw:
http://woodgears.ca/shop-tricks/skillsaw_blade.html

View Loren's profile

Loren

7723 posts in 2334 days


#5 posted 02-11-2013 05:28 PM

You may have seen a dado blade on the saw.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View 12strings's profile

12strings

419 posts in 1070 days


#6 posted 02-11-2013 08:17 PM

Thanks for the replies, woodgears is always an interesting read…

...It was definitely one blade…We used it to rip down some stock.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View crank49's profile

crank49

3456 posts in 1657 days


#7 posted 02-11-2013 08:57 PM

My dad had an ancient old Craftsman TS that was a 9” saw with a 3/4 hp motor.
It was a decent saw but with limited power it actually worked better with a 7 1/4” blade.

That old saw had a 4” jointer attachment on the side of it that used the same motor.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5512 posts in 2061 days


#8 posted 02-11-2013 09:07 PM

My biggest concern with using a 7-1/4” blade is that the kerf width is far more likely to be narrower than the splitter or riving knife, which would cause binding of the workpiece in the middle of the cut. The smaller diameter also changes the effective hook angle of the blade, which can increase tear out on crosscuts and ply.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3182 posts in 1361 days


#9 posted 02-11-2013 09:52 PM

Knot, in the post he said it was a REALLY OLD cabinet saw. Do you suppost it even had a splitter let alone a riving knife??

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1473 posts in 1047 days


#10 posted 02-11-2013 09:54 PM

I used nothing but Forrest, Ridge, and custom Cermet 10” blades since the ‘80s until I switched to a Freud Fusion 8” combo a couple years ago. The only reason I’d go back to a 10” would be to rip stock that the 8” can’t handle. The Freud is a joy to use.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5512 posts in 2061 days


#11 posted 02-11-2013 09:58 PM

”Knot, in the post he said it was a REALLY OLD cabinet saw. Do you suppost it even had a splitter let alone a riving knife??”

Probably not, but I made that statement to prevent a bunch of folks from putting a 7-1/4” blade on their saws, and thinking there isn’t any downside.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View unisaw2's profile

unisaw2

179 posts in 1721 days


#12 posted 02-11-2013 10:58 PM

For thin wood for inlay I use a 6-1/2” blade in my full size table saw. The kerf is 1/16” (vs 1/8” on a 10” Forrest blade). I use it with a zero clearance insert, a nail for a splitter, and a shoe type push stick. Works great on small thin wood (like ripping 1/8” thick material). Since the kerf is smaller, less wood is wasted, and it is runs a lot quieter. YMMV

-- JJ

View cutworm's profile

cutworm

1065 posts in 1479 days


#13 posted 02-11-2013 11:59 PM

I was thinking that the arbors were different in size but I guess that they aren’t.

-- Steve - "Never Give Up"

View 12strings's profile

12strings

419 posts in 1070 days


#14 posted 02-12-2013 03:03 AM

FYI, the “really old saw” had not splitter, riving knife, or blade guard…just a blade sticking out of a big cast iron table.

After this thread, I may go out and get a smaller blade for my saw…its just a cheap craftsman bench-top saw…and I really think the slower speed and thinner blade would allow me to not stress the engine as much. I’m not going to be re-sawing 3 inch stock on this thing anyway. Thanks for all the input.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3182 posts in 1361 days


#15 posted 02-12-2013 03:24 AM

Probably not, but I made that statement to prevent a bunch of folks from putting a 7-1/4” blade on their saws, and thinking there isn’t any downside.
Fair enough. I wasn’t jumpinmg on you. I just thought riving knives and even splitters were items from the last 40 years. I guess some of these guys think that is ancient but there are some really old tools out there. Good point though. The smaller blade and the splitters/riving knives probably won’t go together.

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