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Forum topic by woodman88 posted 432 days ago 874 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodman88

116 posts in 1149 days


432 days ago

So I am in the planning stage of my new shop hopefully starting spring to early summer.I am limited to 32×40 because of zoning.I am planning a 32×40 pole building with 10ft ceillings. I pretty much have my drawing for shop tool layout. My biggest question right now is heat. I am limited to either electric or propane.Not quite sure which would be best. So thats where I was hoping to get alittle help and ideas from my Lumberjocks. I am planning on insulating the crap out it and drywall sidewalls with gloss white metal ceilling.
I have been told Natural Gas is in the works for the next 3- 5years but who knows. So all your help and comments would help Oh yes I do Live in Ohio so we do have cold weather


30 replies so far

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

1955 posts in 2047 days


#1 posted 432 days ago

Hi Woodman88. We also are building. We just broke ground last week on a 40×80 shop. We might take 9 months to build as we will build as we have funds. We are at this time bringing in base and prepping the foundation.

I am in TX so ensuring a good flow of air circulates in the shop during the summertime. But our winter is very mild so I do not plan for heat.

My thoughts on the heat would be how it affects my ability to spray lacquer and any safety implications that exist. Otherwise not sure I have a good answer. I would avoid having an open flame source since we spray a fair amount.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

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woodman88

116 posts in 1149 days


#2 posted 432 days ago

Jerry Thanks for your input.I currently have a 24×24 not at my home which I have a small 10×12 finish room which is pretty well vented. heat the shop with a hanging natural gas REZNOR but the finish room is electric baseboard. also spray alot of lacquer

View Les 's profile

Les

199 posts in 1191 days


#3 posted 431 days ago

Woodman 88

My shop is heated with hot water radiant heat in the floor. It is great heat. My shop is 30×36 with 10’ 6” ceilings. I insulated under the floor and around the edge with 2” blue board as I call it. The walls are 6”. I bought a under sink continuous hot water heater from Menard’s for 168 bucks. It has two heaters of 4500 watt each. I only require one to heat the whole shop.

If you have exposure to the sun you could add solar to off set the heating cost.

Les

-- Stay busy....Stay young

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helluvawreck

14585 posts in 1367 days


#4 posted 431 days ago

Woodman, I asked this same question last week and got a good many interesting responses so you might want to check out that thread also. I’m sure that there a several good threads. When I get caught up I’ll be searching for other threads about this because how you heat is important. Good luck on your shop.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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bugz

768 posts in 1164 days


#5 posted 431 days ago

We have the same problem here in Montana, it is 2 degrees this morning. I bought a Dayton heater, which can be switched from natural gas to propane, I spray all my projects outside, I just plan on doing them around the weather, it works for me, I also have been following these heating threads to see if there is a better, and cheaper way. The in floor head tubes would be great but, to tear out and redo floor is not realilistic for my budget.

-- Bob, Lewistown, Montana. Kindness is the Language the blind can see and deaf can hear. - Mark Twain

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Woodbum

356 posts in 1566 days


#6 posted 431 days ago

Look at Amana PTAC heat pumps. They are like the through the wall hotel heat/cool units but use heat pump technology. I am planning on 2 of these for my 24×40 shop. This is just one option in the many available. AC is more important to me than heat here in OK, with summers of 50+days of 100 degree temps; but 60-65 degrees is good for cold weather for me. Look at these units for another option. They come in many sizes and are pretty economical to buy and use.

-- Improvidus, Apto quod Victum-- Improvise, Adapt, Overcome

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woodman88

116 posts in 1149 days


#7 posted 431 days ago

helluvawrenck I didn.t see that thread I will have to check it out Thanks I have been reading and talking to people but still not sure what I want to do.Ac isn’t that important to me as heat.

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woodman88

116 posts in 1149 days


#8 posted 431 days ago

bugz I am thinking when You said Dayton heater you are talking about the hanging type Like REZNOR? That is how I heat my current shop with nat gas. I am thinking there has to be a more efficient way. I do Spray alot of Lacqer and am planning a separate finish room

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woodman88

116 posts in 1149 days


#9 posted 431 days ago

thanks woodbum I will have to check that out. I currently heat my house with heat pump and it really is that bad price wise

View Greg In Maryland's profile

Greg In Maryland

353 posts in 1498 days


#10 posted 431 days ago

Here is an link to an Excel spreadsheet with fuel and operating costs from the US Energy Information Agency from this webpage: http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=8&t=5

The spreadsheet contains info on various fuel sources and heating methods and is quite interesting. However, the cost of installation and equipment does not appear to be included, which could really skew the results.

Greg

View teejk's profile

teejk

1186 posts in 1185 days


#11 posted 431 days ago

I’ll chime in…West central Wisconsin and all the elements that come with it (-30F in the winter, +90 in the summer). I built a 56×30 shop, 10’ ceilings. I heated 40×30 of that space with radiant infloor and finished with bright white steel ceilings and walls.

It ain’t cheap but there is something in the brain that says if your feet and legs are warm, you are good (e.g. if I keep it at 55F I’m comfortable…higher if I’m doing paint/stain but that’s a function of the material cure time). The tubing (5/8’ because it allows for longer runs) was expensive at the time (cheaper now I think) and a pain to install. And 2” closed cell foam under it all.

The heat source is a 65 gal LP power vented hot water heater that could be converted to a “closed loop” system. Had to charge the system with glycol mix since it is remote and you don’t want a closed loop system to freeze.

Downside? unless you know exactly what your shop is going to look like forever, you can’t open the slab for wiring or anything. Once the slab is poured, you are essentially done.

Holler back if you want more info.

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woodman88

116 posts in 1149 days


#12 posted 431 days ago

Thanks teejk that is what I am kinda leaning too but the cost I am not sure of. I am thinking either in floor or propane radiant tube heat . just trying to take in alot of what others are telling me

View Les 's profile

Les

199 posts in 1191 days


#13 posted 430 days ago

Check out the pex cost in your area, I put 1000’ in the crete when I poured it. Maybe 250 bucks, if you want it later it is there. Check out this link. http://www.radiantec.com/index.php

I will try and post pictures tomorrow.

Les

-- Stay busy....Stay young

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woodman88

116 posts in 1149 days


#14 posted 430 days ago

Thanks Les what are you using for heatsource?

View teejk's profile

teejk

1186 posts in 1185 days


#15 posted 430 days ago

Woodman…Ohio is usually not as harsh a climate…as I said, in-floor can be expensive to install and operate but that’s a fact of life in our frozen Tundra. You might be happy with a ceiling mounted Hot-Dog.

Now at the risk of starting another fight with the DC zealots but the forced air heat also is very good at getting rid of airborne sawdust…smells just like a campfire but it is gone!

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