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ReJapanning Planes - what do you use?

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Forum topic by Ripthorn posted 537 days ago 1162 views 2 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ripthorn

736 posts in 1590 days


537 days ago

So I’ve got a couple planes that I am working on rehabbing/restoring and one or two are missing a lot of japanning (less than 40% remaining). I am not worried about collecting, but rather using. I have seen some people use actual japanning lacquer, but I don’t care to spend the time or money on something so specialized (not worried about being super correct). I have a can of black acrylic lacquer floating around, or I could pick up some kind of black paint. So my question to all is what do you use for re-japanning a plane?

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science


27 replies so far

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4137 posts in 1556 days


#1 posted 537 days ago

I really liked the black engine enamel in a spray can. It goes on nice and thick—just follow the directions.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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shampeon

1306 posts in 788 days


#2 posted 537 days ago

A lot of folks go with Duplicolor Ford black engine paint, which you can apparently get at auto parts stores, and very closely mimics the look of japaning. I’ve used Rustoleum hammered black to give it some texture.

For a user, though, you could just brush some shellac over the current finish and metal. That will keep the exposed parts from rusting, and keep oxygen out of the nooks and crannies. The hard part about refinishing the body is stripping the old finish completely. If you’ve got a media blaster or are set up for electrolysis, that makes it a lot easier. Wire brushing it all off is dusty and messy, and it’s hard to get all the corners clean. Paint stripper will eventually work, but that’s also messy to clean up.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View Don W's profile

Don W

14671 posts in 1172 days


#3 posted 537 days ago

I use Dupli-Color Engine Enamel DUPDE1635 Ford Semi Gloss Black spray paint and here is my restore blog

If you want traditional japanning, look at jayT’s blog http://lumberjocks.com/JayT/blog/series/5621

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Ripthorn

736 posts in 1590 days


#4 posted 537 days ago

Maybe I will just got the shellac route, as I don’t feel particularly inclined to sand blast or otherwise get rid of the remaining japanning in the nooks and crannies. I admit it, I’m lazy :)

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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JayT

2114 posts in 816 days


#5 posted 537 days ago

Any kind of spray enamel will work to protect from rust, it just depends on what you want it to look like. As far as stripping the old japanning, a wire brush works great and some aerosol paint strippers will do the job pretty easily and quickly, as well.

There is nothing wrong with a coat of shellac and then use the planes. If you decide to do more of a restoration in the future, you’ll have options.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View Tim's profile

Tim

1185 posts in 566 days


#6 posted 537 days ago

I’ve been reading a lot on restoring tools, and the only problem with just adding shellac without carefully removing all the rust (which can be under the loose japanning) is the rust will just continue under the shellac. But if it’s truly just a user plane and you’re not too worried about that, you’ll probably protect some areas still.

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Francisco Luna

936 posts in 1998 days


#7 posted 537 days ago

years ago, I tryed the original formula with asphaltum and taking the tool to high temperatures, but I can tell you’ll never get the same thing….

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6915 posts in 1519 days


#8 posted 537 days ago

I use Rustoleum Ultra 2X Semi-Gloss. Bought it at HD and it has held up well. I stripped everything with an electrolysis bath. Very easy to do and it it will take it all off. found it best to run the 12v charger at 10amps and at least 24hr or more.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Don W's profile

Don W

14671 posts in 1172 days


#9 posted 536 days ago

Either way you need to remove the rust. You don’t want to encapsulate the rust. At least dip it in a rust remover like evapo rust or citric acid.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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HorizontalMike

6915 posts in 1519 days


#10 posted 536 days ago

+10 on what Don says regarding the rust. Another method you can use if it is just a ‘user’ is to use RustFree from Boeshield, on the exposed iron. This stuff, while removing the rust, also seems make treated surfaces a bit more resistant to rust in the future. Not completely, but it does seem to stabilize the surface.

http://boeshield.com/features-benefits/rustfree/

Directions

For light rust on steel or cast iron, spray RustFree™ on a rag and wipe surface. Do not spray directly on surface, as it may cause spotting.

For heavy rust apply RustFree™ thoroughly wetting surface, allow to penetrate for 30 seconds, then scrub with Scotch-Brite pad before wiping off.
Caution
RustFree is acidic and should be used with care:

- Rinse thoroughly off painted surfaces and neutralize with soap and water.
- Do not use on guns or black oxide tools.
- Can dull paint or plastics.
- Can cause spotting on cast iron or steel.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

736 posts in 1590 days


#11 posted 536 days ago

All planes in question have been de-rusted quite well. Just when I thought I would just put some shellac on, Mike goes and posts a picture like that, curse you! Now I might want to do a full blown restore, grrr. :)

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

View Don W's profile

Don W

14671 posts in 1172 days


#12 posted 536 days ago

Then if you’re on the fence, don’t look here

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/35888

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Benvolio's profile

Benvolio

132 posts in 536 days


#13 posted 536 days ago

Just out of interest, what method do you guys use to take off the old layer of japanning before applying the new???

-- Ben, England.

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TheDane

3659 posts in 2268 days


#14 posted 536 days ago

Benvolio—I used a paint stripper from the BORG (Stripeze ?), then did as Mike suggested and gave it a 24-hr electrolysis bath. I did a thorough cleaning, masked the sides and soles, and sprayed with Ford engine enamel.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Don W's profile

Don W

14671 posts in 1172 days


#15 posted 536 days ago

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