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Forum topic by ptofimpact posted 02-09-2013 01:11 PM 825 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ptofimpact

280 posts in 1069 days


02-09-2013 01:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: kitchen pullout drawer question

Getting ready to cut some Baltic Birch Plywood for Kitchen Pullout Drawers, two questions if I may;

1-do the sides / front/ back get attached to the Top of the drawer Bottom, or to the sides.

2- Using a 140 tooth plywood blade, how do I limit splintering.

Thanks.

-- Pete in NC


13 replies so far

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

802 posts in 925 days


#1 posted 02-09-2013 03:32 PM

You can attach the bottom to the bottom of the sides but it won’t last long before the load in the drawer pushes the bottom off. Most drawers have a dodo(groove) cut around the inside of the drawersdes and front and back the bottom slides into the groove and is supported on all four sides. The bottoms are generally not glued in to allow moisture movement.
To control splintering, if you’re on a table saw keep the good side up. You can tape the kerf area on bottom side with masking tape and this will help some.
If you are using a portable saw good side down.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6058 posts in 2181 days


#2 posted 02-09-2013 03:42 PM

Bruce has it right. But, with Baltic birch and a sharp 140 T blade, I would anticipate negligible tear out.
Please do not attach the drawer bottom to the bottom of the drawer sides unless this is a utility/shop cabinet. Even then, not a wise method.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1742 posts in 987 days


#3 posted 02-09-2013 03:50 PM

+1 on each comment above.
Other methods to limit tearout are to score the blade path on both sides with knife cut. You can also take a very shallow pass, about 1/16”, then make the full cut.
No matter how light the load, a bottom attached panel for drawer bottom is not workable long term. If you can’t make the space saving dado cut, then at least glue and nail a small strip (1/4×1/4 minimum) around the inside perimeter of the drawer to rest the bottom upon.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View ptofimpact's profile

ptofimpact

280 posts in 1069 days


#4 posted 02-09-2013 08:45 PM

Thank you all for your time and expertise, and I shall take all advice and aply it going foward.
I wonder if Baltic is a good candidate for Box Joints on a Router table?
Dont have a table saw just a 20+ year old Craftsman circular saw…still cuts pretty good.

-- Pete in NC

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1742 posts in 987 days


#5 posted 02-09-2013 10:04 PM

Nope. Not unless you back it up tightly with a scrap piece. It will blow out the back every time.

Don’t need a table saw nor the “slkill” saw. Lots of great furniture was built with a handsaw, chisel, plane and a good marking knife. You can make your own square. It is FAR easier to cut dovetails by hand than a box joint on a router table. At least I wouldn’t do it. I love box joints and use them frequently, but they are cut on a table saw jig like I show in my blog archive.

http://kragerwoodworking.weebly.com/1/post/2012/05/box-joint-small-wedge-jig.html

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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Dan Krager

1742 posts in 987 days


#6 posted 02-10-2013 03:54 AM

Here is a photo of an LJ practicing dovetails. This is only his third effort (that he talks about).
http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff394/my70hornet/BoxBoards/78A41750-A606-48F1-AEE5-909B324B0CCA-801-000000711DE3ADE8_zps4db24ae7.jpg
GO FOR IT!
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View ptofimpact's profile

ptofimpact

280 posts in 1069 days


#7 posted 02-10-2013 01:13 PM

Dan, thank you again, I have saved the links you kindly shared, I am especially interested in your site with the box joint info. I have not tried hand dovetails, nor mortise and tenon, but have purchased a medium grade set of hand chisels. The only thing I have used them for is a handmade Marking gauge.
Thank you again, great site, Great site, Great Folks~

-- Pete in NC

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1742 posts in 987 days


#8 posted 02-10-2013 01:34 PM

Pete,
If you have any questions, I’ll be happy to help best I can. Advice is free and sometimes worth as much. Here is another link that may help explain the box joint cutter. It depends on a table saw so I’m not sure how helpful it will be to you. If your router table has a miter slot a smaller version could be built.
http://s837.beta.photobucket.com/user/kragerd/library/Custom%20Wood%20Products%20Portfolio/Box%20Joint%20And%20Wedge%20Jig
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View ptofimpact's profile

ptofimpact

280 posts in 1069 days


#9 posted 02-10-2013 04:54 PM

DanK, thank you once more Perhaps a question if I may. Been researching drawer slides, our uses will only require the Blum epoxy white slides, as we have a pantry for canned goods and heavy items.
What I am trying to establish is; the base cabinets are approx 23 1/2 inches from Back to Front of Faceframe…when I use Rear Sockets to attach the slides, how do I determine the length lost, due to Rear Sockets, so I can determine length of slides to buy?
Any direction appreciated.

-- Pete in NC

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

4985 posts in 828 days


#10 posted 02-10-2013 05:07 PM

Hi Pete,

I built a set of pull out cabinet drawers. Feel free to check out my projects. I’m relatively new to all of this, so mine weren’t anything fancy, but I’m pleased with the end product.

The biggest lesson I learned with the drawers is that nothing is square. In other words, don’t expect the bottom of your base cabinet to be parallel to the floor and don’t expect the sides to be parallel each other. No matter how square your new drawers are, you’ll likely have to adjust and shim.

Good luck, and if I can be of any help, feel free.

Sandra

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1742 posts in 987 days


#11 posted 02-10-2013 05:08 PM

I always have the hardware on hand to actually measure, or go to a place I can touch it. You should be able to get the specifications and mounting instructions from the hardware mfr if not the supplier.

I would be careful, too, to use drawer hardware that is heavier than the rating might suggest. I consider a drawer slide rated for 50 lbs a light duty drawer. I’ve never seen epoxy coated hardware rated higher than a light duty. It seems to me that you might need to consider heavier slides than you are suggesting. These pantry goods get really heavy. Even hardware rated at 100 lbs might be light for this application. This will be especially important if you are securing the slide only at the rear and front! I’d be reluctant to use this type with this heavy an application. Heavy duty (150-200 lb), full extension, secured along its entire length slide is the only thing I would consider.
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=1491
but they’re sold out.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

4985 posts in 828 days


#12 posted 02-10-2013 05:11 PM

Here are the plans I used.

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/step/0,,709890,00.html

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View ptofimpact's profile

ptofimpact

280 posts in 1069 days


#13 posted 02-10-2013 08:12 PM

Sandra, thanks for the help and info, and yes, found out nothing is square so have to install with adjustments. Thanks for the link, am using something very similar from DIY site. Like you, not a cabinet maker, so fancy is not the result required, something functional, but not terrible to look at.

DanK, been looking on Rockler, but also Lee Valley has some prices better than the box stores, thanks again. The drawers will hold pots, pans, cookie sheets, paper goods, all the ‘heavy stuff’ is in a seperate Pantry with wire shelves.

-- Pete in NC

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