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Need advice on how to make mouldings

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Forum topic by 404 - Not Found posted 02-08-2013 12:36 PM 727 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1720 days


02-08-2013 12:36 PM

I went to look at a job last night. A wardrobe. So I’m thinking, ok, standard melamine chipboard, buy the doors, in and out, onto the next job.
I arrive at the gates of what is surely the largest house I have ever seen. 300 years old, full of period detail. The room this wardrobe is going in is nearly the size of a tennis court. The brief is to make a wardrobe, sympathetic to it’s surrounding (naturally enough). This job is a monster. I have an idea of what I can do, but I’m stuck on just a couple of details, I hope some of you guys can help.

Question 1 is how to make the cove cornice with a radius for the corners. The cove itself is larger than any spindle tooling available to me. I am considering doing the straight runs on the TS. I may need to make 4 curved corner pieces as it could well have a breakfront.

(Edit)

It just occurred to me to make a blank and turn it, then cut it into quarters to attach to the straight runs. Will that work? I don’t know as I’ve never needed to make that kind of profile before. If it comes to it, I could turn two blanks and cut out what I need – this way the grain orientation will be right without having to mitre the blank – it would also leave a little waste to work with.

Question 2 curved bolection moulding around top of door. There are six doors with this detail, I am considering making the blanks as a bent lamination and then routing a profile on them. Sound feasible?

As always, any helpful comments are much appreciated.

Also, can anyone recommend a good book on Victorian cabinet making or reproductions?


10 replies so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10374 posts in 1369 days


#1 posted 02-08-2013 12:56 PM

This?

I’ve wondered about this kind of detail, too. Watching this to see what comes from the group.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1720 days


#2 posted 02-08-2013 01:05 PM

That won’t do it Smitty, the radius of the cove will be 3-4”, but thanks anyway.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10374 posts in 1369 days


#3 posted 02-08-2013 01:09 PM

Multiple passes, angled table top, etc. etc. I’ve not attempted such stuff. Hope the answer comes. Maybe arch. salvage houses, or even Co.s that might sell such corner pieces?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Moron's profile

Moron

4724 posts in 2645 days


#4 posted 02-08-2013 01:12 PM

I would do them on the shaper but a router in a table would also work through repetitive steps.

Doing a bent lamination might not work as when you remove wood to make the cove would leave glue lines where the wood was removed (super ugly)

I would cut the pieces for the cove mold out of solid wood on the bandsaw leaving long tails, make a jig to support the piece and use a router bit with bearing and a pin to support the jig. Take small cuts to come close to the profile and then clean it up with a scraper and sand paper.

As for the curve in the RP of the door……..easily done with a router

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Bogeyguy's profile

Bogeyguy

499 posts in 819 days


#5 posted 02-08-2013 01:17 PM

and forget the melamine chip bd.

-- Art, Pittsburgh.

View Moron's profile

Moron

4724 posts in 2645 days


#6 posted 02-08-2013 01:36 PM

before you forget the melamine chipboard please consider

its sold in low density, medium density, and high density/high pressure cores, a world of difference there. Its also sold with a 100, 110 and 120 gram paper (melamine). Its competitive in pricing, it easy to clean, no painting and its in area where it wont get wet and if fabricated right, will be around long after we are dead.

Ruling it out is similar in saying that a solid wood load bearing beam is better then an LVL (composite) beam which isnt true.

Jus sayn : ))

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

16043 posts in 1618 days


#7 posted 02-08-2013 03:17 PM

The problem with doing them with a shaper or router is the tooling. I’m certainly no lathe expert but I really don’t see why you couldn’t do them with a lathe. At least you wouldn’t have a tooling problem.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View grfrazee's profile

grfrazee

346 posts in 891 days


#8 posted 02-08-2013 03:24 PM

I imagine there should be some way to do this on the table saw with some sort of rollered jig, but I can see that getting pretty dangerous. If all else fails, there are always gouges and rasps.

How is this being finished? I’m sure I’m not the only one who will be interested in pictures when it’s all done.

-- -=Pride is not a sin=-

View Les Hastings's profile

Les Hastings

1282 posts in 2524 days


#9 posted 02-08-2013 03:44 PM

I’ve made these a number of times, I always turn them. I make 4 square blocks the size I need. Then I glue them together with paper between them so they will come apart easily after they are done. Sand the paper off and they are ready to go. Use a cutt off from the straight crown to make templates to guide in the turning process.

-- Les, Wichita, Ks. (I'd rather be covered in saw dust!)

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1720 days


#10 posted 02-08-2013 08:50 PM

Thanks everyone. I am going with what Les says – I wasn’t too far off the mark thinking about doing the corners on the lathe.

Everyone should look at Les Hastings projects, simply amazing work.

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