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Forum topic by Pabs posted 02-06-2013 02:08 PM 829 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pabs

175 posts in 2176 days


02-06-2013 02:08 PM

hey all

anyone have any experience using these types of heaters?
radiant heater

how well do they work? my shop (attached garage) gets pretty cold in the winter…I have one of those construction heaters but it doesn’t do a great job… curious about these radiant heaters

my shop is insulated and about 20 by 25 in size

how close do you need to be in order to feel the heat from these?

-- Pabs


13 replies so far

View bob101's profile

bob101

189 posts in 2173 days


#1 posted 02-06-2013 02:23 PM

i am looking at installing one as well and have done some research, there are two types . low and high intensity. i have been told by a heating contractor that a low intensity type is the one for a woodworking shop. and that the more stuff you have in your shop the better they heat, as they dont really heat the air as much as the contents . the heat from them is great.

-- rob, ont,canada

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Pabs

175 posts in 2176 days


#2 posted 02-06-2013 02:28 PM

I presume that what I posted would be considered a low intensity model?

-- Pabs

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15983 posts in 1589 days


#3 posted 02-06-2013 02:32 PM

Interesting. What’s the biggest size they make?

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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Pabs

175 posts in 2176 days


#4 posted 02-06-2013 02:40 PM

they only have the one model at Lee Valley

-- Pabs

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1254 posts in 1804 days


#5 posted 02-06-2013 02:51 PM

They work well when the heater can ‘see’ a lot of stuff and it can stay on for a while. The IR does not heat the air well at all. If you stand in front of it you face will feel warm but back will get cold. It will get the tools and table tops warm which will heat the air, albeit slowly.

-- Chris K

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Kreegan

1452 posts in 869 days


#6 posted 02-06-2013 09:11 PM

I have that exact heater. It’s largely worthless unless you’re within 5 feet of it. The best thing to do is point it at something large and stationary and let it heat that up. For instance, I had it pointed at my lathe for awhile.

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 1587 days


#7 posted 02-06-2013 11:57 PM

120 volt heaters (1500 watt) typically are not very good in heating up a cold room . They are better at maintaining a temp than bringing a frigid room up to a comfortable level.

Many use supplemental heaters like kerosene to bring the temp up quickly, and electric 1500 watt heaters to maintain the temp.

HD sells 240 volt electric heaters that have received good reveiws from woodworkers in forums. Those 240 volt heaters are quite capable of bringing up the temp quickly.

View rockindavan's profile

rockindavan

284 posts in 1359 days


#8 posted 02-07-2013 12:41 AM

I use a forced air heater first to get the shop warm. After that I have a propane radiant heater to maintain the temp. The radiant heat doesn’t warm the shop up quickly, but you sure notice when you turn it off and the temp drops, especially in an uninsulated garage. Radiant heaters are definitely a lot quieter.

View MarkwithaK's profile

MarkwithaK

370 posts in 1901 days


#9 posted 02-07-2013 02:13 AM

If you are wanting this to heat your entire shop to a comfortable working temp then I would suggest that you consider other options. These types of heaters are fine for spot heating but as soon as you walk away the effects will be lost. For a shop your size 5,000-ish BTU is extremely undersized.

-- If at first you don't succeed then maybe skydiving isn't for you.

View bob101's profile

bob101

189 posts in 2173 days


#10 posted 02-12-2013 01:53 PM

oh you are talking electric radiant heat, i was talking about a gas tube radiant heater. sorry for the confusion. I dont think the lee valley elecric radiant heater will do it, or if it does will cost you a fortune in hydro.

-- rob, ont,canada

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

175 posts in 2176 days


#11 posted 02-12-2013 02:41 PM

yeah it kind of sounds too good to be true…
man some days I wish I was rich and this was 50 years ago when there was no (or very little) environmental conscience… I would keep that place heated all he time at the same temp as the rest of the house!
ah well. at least I’m fortunate enough to HAVE a workshop…a luxury many would kill for, heat or no heat!

thanks for the tips guys

-- Pabs

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MrRon

2933 posts in 1966 days


#12 posted 02-12-2013 09:35 PM

The oil filled electric radiators work real well, though a bit pricey.

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MrRon

2933 posts in 1966 days


#13 posted 02-12-2013 09:40 PM

I think the wood stove is ideal heat for a shop. The down side is there are a lot of flammable materials around posing a fire hazard.

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