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Can I use a router speed controller on these?

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Forum topic by JoeinGa posted 02-05-2013 10:51 PM 1434 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JoeinGa

3287 posts in 673 days


02-05-2013 10:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: electric motor speed controller router controller reducing speed on electric motor question

I’ve spent about 2 hours Googling and all I’m getting is a headache plus more and more confused :-(

I’m trying to build a 12” shop made disc sander, and the first motor I tried was WAY underpowered. I dug around in my shop and came up with 2 more electric motors, both of which are plenty powerful, but both of them run at 3450rpm, which is too fast for a sander. Both of these motors have capacitors on them (if that info is helpful)

Since I’m no electricial geenious, I’m looking for some help here. I’ll post good clear photos of both the info-plates and I’m hoping SOMEONE way smarter them me can decifer if I can use a HF router speed control to drop the speed by about 1/2… Thanks in advance.

This Doerr motor was from an old air compressor. It has a mounting plate on the base already and the capacitors are mounted on the outer shell of the motor. .

. And this Marathon Electric motor came out of a commercial floor sander. It’s a beast, and I know it would have enough power. I also already know it is set for 110v. There’s no mounting plate on this one but I already have a way to mount it if it’ll work.
.

.
The square box on the bottom in this pic is where the capacitors are. That smaller motor in this last pic is the one I tried that is way underpowered for this application.
.

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16 replies so far

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Alexandre

1417 posts in 857 days


#1 posted 02-05-2013 10:56 PM

I don’t think so… You could use a belt and pulley..
P.S I am not the best advice to listen to… btw :3

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prattman

440 posts in 783 days


#2 posted 02-05-2013 11:16 PM

My bad, it will not work on either motor as they are both induction type motors

-- Everyone calls me Ed or Eddie , mom still calls me Edward if she is mad at me.

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CessnaPilotBarry

892 posts in 776 days


#3 posted 02-05-2013 11:32 PM

I’m not so sure an induction motor will operate with the router speed control.

Routers have universal motors, this is an induction motor. The two types of speed controls operate differently.

You may be able to control the speed with a fan speed control.

-- It's all good, if it's wood...

View crank49's profile

crank49

3443 posts in 1637 days


#4 posted 02-05-2013 11:51 PM

A VFD (variable frequency drive) is the only effective electronic method that will control the speed of an induction motor. That is not the type controller often referred to as a router speed control.

I say effective electronic method because you can vary the speed by a big rheostat or a variable auto transformer but both these methods just reduce the voltage and you lose power faster than you lose speed. Also, with reduced voltage you stand a good chance of overloading and frying a motor.

A VFD will solve your motor speed problem however. It can be set to feed 30 hertz power to a 3450 rpm motor and make it a 1725 rpm motor. The only real shortcoming of these controllers is they cost more than the motor.

By the way, you will need at least a 1 hp motor to run that 12” disk. That’s why I just bought the 12” disk sander at HF. It was cheaper than I could buy the motor alone. Never regretted this purchase.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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TopamaxSurvivor

14796 posts in 2341 days


#5 posted 02-06-2013 12:04 AM

Joe, It is too bad Tesla’s AC system won. If we used Edison’s DC motors, it would be easier to control the speed ;-)

It has been pretty well summed up, no cheap, easy way to control the speed on these motors.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3287 posts in 673 days


#6 posted 02-06-2013 12:17 AM

Thanks guys. Back to square one. Maybe I can trade all 3 of these motors for one that will do as I want?

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TopamaxSurvivor

14796 posts in 2341 days


#7 posted 02-06-2013 12:29 AM

Getting a 1725 rpm would be a good place to start ;-) That will get the speed down to half.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

14796 posts in 2341 days


#8 posted 02-06-2013 12:29 AM

What speed do you need?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14344 posts in 1004 days


#9 posted 02-06-2013 01:13 AM

Most of them are not designed to be variable speed. Could actually burn them up.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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JoeinGa

3287 posts in 673 days


#10 posted 02-06-2013 01:24 AM

Topamax… not sure what the optimum speed is for sanding. I just know that most “standard” 110volt electric motors run at 1725. And I remember reading somewhere that 3450 was too fast for sanding cuz it’ll shred the paper

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View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2544 posts in 1017 days


#11 posted 02-06-2013 01:33 AM

Through use of different size pulleys and a belt you could get just about any speed you want, it just wouldn’t be variable. Put a 2” pulley on the motor and a 4” on the sanding disk shaft and you’ve cut your speed in half.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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TopamaxSurvivor

14796 posts in 2341 days


#12 posted 02-06-2013 01:53 AM

The speed has to do the number of poles, 60 cycles and stuff like that. I would guess that 1725 is the standard it these are too fast.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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JoeinGa

3287 posts in 673 days


#13 posted 02-06-2013 01:54 AM

Bonda… I’m not actually looking for variable speed. I was just looking to slow it down and I thought maybe the router speed controller (set at low) might do it.

Yes I could use pulleys, but then I’d have to buy the parts to make the disc a separate “stand alone” piece on a shaft with pilllow blocks and run by the motor via pulley system. WHat I have now is the disc is mounted directly to the motor shaft and I was trying to use that setup.

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Shawn Masterson

1255 posts in 614 days


#14 posted 02-06-2013 03:28 AM

what ever you do make sure it is a sealed motor like the marathon appears to be. an open frame would draw the dust into the motor.

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Rick M.

4022 posts in 1046 days


#15 posted 02-06-2013 03:39 AM

I’d trade ya a 1750 rpm motor but it’s only 1/3hp.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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