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Is the #8 jointer plane to large? Do you use one?

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Forum topic by rkober posted 02-05-2013 05:42 PM 1713 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rkober

127 posts in 988 days


02-05-2013 05:42 PM

I’ve been watching a #8 Lie Nielsen on Craigslist for a while now. He’s down to $250 which seems like a pretty good deal. I love my old Stanley #7 and would like to get some LN’s in the corral. However that #8 seems like a beast. Thoughts/advice?

-- Ray - Spokane, WA - “Most people don’t recognize opportunity because it’s usually disguised as hard work.” - Unknown


26 replies so far

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1647 days


#1 posted 02-05-2013 05:54 PM

rkober, I use my #8 (Record) a lot. I would say pretty much on any project I do. Is it too big? Not at all. Jointers should be big to make jointing and flattening easy and more accurate.

I also have a #7 (Record) and here is how I have the #8 and #7 set up: The #7 has a straight blade on it used for finish jointing and on smaller parts. I have the #8 set up with a cambered blade used for rough jointing and long boards. The cambered blade excels at getting the edges square, especially on those that I cut with a handsaw because I am not perfect with long rip cuts.

I highly recommend a #8. In fact, it is not the largest jointer I have. I have a longer, heavier wood bodied one that I break out now and then for some jobs.

-- Mike

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Loren

7743 posts in 2343 days


#2 posted 02-05-2013 05:55 PM

You’d have no problem reselling it on ebay and recouping
your investment.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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rkober

127 posts in 988 days


#3 posted 02-05-2013 06:12 PM

Thanks guys.

-- Ray - Spokane, WA - “Most people don’t recognize opportunity because it’s usually disguised as hard work.” - Unknown

View Brad's profile

Brad

900 posts in 1436 days


#4 posted 02-06-2013 02:27 AM

I’m 5’ 6” and I have no trouble with my SB #8. I use it on large panels or to flatten boards. It’s larger mass is a big benefit because it pushes through the cut. I do break a sweat with it. But the heft works in its favor.

-- "People's lives are their own rewards or punishments."

View gawthrrw's profile

gawthrrw

187 posts in 1143 days


#5 posted 02-06-2013 02:33 AM

I have a number 7 stanley and love the weight of it. I bet it would be less stress on your arms and shoulders with the inertia of the #8. Just my 2 cents.

-- Rob, Dallas TX

View Don W's profile

Don W

15278 posts in 1263 days


#6 posted 02-06-2013 02:43 AM

I love my 608

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

2050 posts in 947 days


#7 posted 02-06-2013 04:38 AM

I have and use a Stanley No. 7, but I’m always looking for a good No. 8. I’ll pick one up when the time and price are right, clean ‘em up, tune ‘em up and put ‘em to work. I have my No. 7 set up with a camber on the blade. If I do get a No. 8, I’ll probably set them up like LJ paratrooper34 has his 7 and 8 set up.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

7175 posts in 1379 days


#8 posted 02-06-2013 01:34 PM

I will use my #8c when doing long boards

and sometimes, even just a table leg. Once you set the plane ON the wood, all you need to do is push it along.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View rkober's profile

rkober

127 posts in 988 days


#9 posted 02-06-2013 11:03 PM

Thanks again. I’m trying to get a hold of the guy with the plane. I just didn’t want to buy a beast that’s to big to use.

-- Ray - Spokane, WA - “Most people don’t recognize opportunity because it’s usually disguised as hard work.” - Unknown

View ScrubPlane's profile

ScrubPlane

187 posts in 891 days


#10 posted 03-11-2013 01:20 AM

Several thoughts…

I purchased a #8 two years ago and feared the same thing at first. Then I realized the two most important details. First, plane set-up…a very sharp blade and ‘clean’ plane bottom. You are, after all, pushing a lot of steel across the wood. The second thought is related to ergonomics. Make sure the height of the working surface is such that you utilize the bigger muscles of your shoulders and legs through the ‘push’. This will greatly reduce your back strain.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6954 posts in 1610 days


#11 posted 03-11-2013 01:37 AM

I recently acquired a restored TYPE #2 ‘Horseshoe’ Sargent #424 (Stanley type #8) with re-japanning in original Asphaltum and all the correct early parts. Have no plans on actually putting it to use, but sure love looking at that huge aircraft landing strip sized casting with the Type #1 markings and “dot” on the sole. I got a way too good of a deal to past it up.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Brad's profile

Brad

900 posts in 1436 days


#12 posted 03-11-2013 02:51 AM

Don, did your #608 come with the side fence or did you modify it yourself after the fact.

Also, how does that fence work? Is it easier to joint edges with?

-- "People's lives are their own rewards or punishments."

View Don W's profile

Don W

15278 posts in 1263 days


#13 posted 03-11-2013 11:22 AM

Brad, the 608 came with the holes, I made the fence.

It’s easier to keep a true 90 when using it, especially on wider stuff.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View reedwood's profile

reedwood

885 posts in 1371 days


#14 posted 03-11-2013 12:57 PM

Nice plane choice for a collection. Those planes go for 3 to 500.00 used, even more with the box.

How much is he asking for it?........wat’s his number? he he look out….I’ll out bid you!

You can pick up a sweet Stanley # 8 for 60 – 175.00 on E Bay that works just as good if not better because you won’t be staring at it or afraid to scratch it. Heck, I would buy both!

Seeing those holes drilled in that Stanley # 608 bedrock made me cringe. I have a no. 7 Type 2 that someone drilled small holes in the side and wondered if it was for mounting on a wall. Now I’m sure it was for a fence like this one. Too bad it destroyed the value by half. If that matters.

It does look like a great set up. I like the knob on the side.

But If I may suggest, find an old craftsman or a pitted stanley to drill into. Save those bedrock planes! You wouldn’t drill holes in the Lie Nielson, right? These are just as collectable as the LNs. and going up in value.

Also, save your cardboard boxes your tools come in…. makes them more valuable and very collectable.

That’s what I discovered recently after 2 months researching the history of hand planes followed by a spending spree on E bay. I also collect and restore planes for fun.

edit – I just noticed this post is 33 days old. Did you buy it?

-- Mark - I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15278 posts in 1263 days


#15 posted 03-11-2013 01:09 PM

Mark, I would have never put those holes in that 608. But being they were there made it easy.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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