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Turning wet wood

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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 02-03-2013 06:42 PM 792 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

2950 posts in 941 days


02-03-2013 06:42 PM

I purchased 6 or 7 different woods online. They come precut 8×3 or 10×4. I’m turning a piece of curly maple now and the thing is so wet it’s flinging water out.

It won’t cut some of the grain because it’s so wet.

Here’s what I’ve done so far. I mounted a face plate on it and turned the wax off the sides. I started to bring down the back end for a chuck but stopped because I need to ask how to proceed from here.

I need to get a chuck on this wood, and I have to take 8” down to about 3.5 inches to do it.
Should I wait till things dry out a bit or keep going?

Should I take all the wax off or is it good to leave it on the large surfaces to keep them from cracking?

Advice or links to videos will help.

Thanks in advance for all your help.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


6 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1037 posts in 789 days


#1 posted 02-03-2013 08:20 PM

I start a lot of rough out bowl blanks between centers using Chuck and screw that comes with chuck. Drill hole in center of blank that will be my inside of bowl. Rough the outside cutting a recess in bottom so can chuck for reverse turning inside bowl.

Also do the same using two-prong drive center in headstock and live center in tailstock.

For even easier mounting in chuck drill a recess with a forstner bit in drill press.

I turn to even thickness and do not re-seal a blank. Depending upon wetness of wood may put in brown grocery bag for couple of weeks. Sometimes use shaving sometimes not. Some folks like using plastic bags, just remember without air circulation wood cannot dry. I do remove shavings after week or two.

Never have any problem cutting wet wood with sharp bowl gouges. Carbide scrappers supposed to eat up wet or dry wood.

-- Bill

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RussellAP

2950 posts in 941 days


#2 posted 02-03-2013 08:35 PM

Thanks Bill. I was using a one inch round scraper and the square tungston carbide sorbe to drill down from the outside. I could just use a bowl gouge from the back side and make my tenon.
I used the face plate with four screws, good steel wood screws. At this point, mounting is a weak spot for me. I see a lot of videos by guys that know what they’re talking about, but have no clue how to communicate it. I’d like to know if there is a competent communicator out there somewhere producing video’s. Some of these videos are really really bad.

So if I cut it down to bowl dimensions and leave it thick, I should probably stick it in a paper bag with some shavings for a couple weeks? And fate takes it from there.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3455 posts in 2615 days


#3 posted 02-03-2013 08:41 PM

Russ,
Turning wet wood to ROUGH dimensions is no prob. Just don’t get antsy and try to finish turn until the wood has had a chance to stabilize unless ya want the look of warped turnings (which is not bad). Drying time will vary with the specie, but rule of thumb is 1” per year unless ya force dry the rough turnings.
Most turners will rough turn the project, store it in a bag/box with some of the shavings until stabilized, then finish turn.
When turning wood as wet as you describe, most turners will cover the lathe bed to prevent rust. Need you ask how I have learned this? :)
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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RussellAP

2950 posts in 941 days


#4 posted 02-03-2013 08:53 PM

It’s not flinging water, but its pretty soggy. I was hoping I could force it dry, it’s going to deform either way. Its curly maple, any suggestions.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View BiggKountry's profile

BiggKountry

18 posts in 1320 days


#5 posted 02-03-2013 09:25 PM

If you go on You Tube and look up Lyle Jameison’s videos, you might find what you are looking for. Also, try and look up Bob Hamilton’s videos. They both offer great videos. IMHO.

Keith

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1037 posts in 789 days


#6 posted 02-04-2013 11:54 AM

There are so many free videos online hard to recommend just one site or one video. Look at these links and kind of keep track of videos that interest you. You can find specific videos by just searching the internet for what you want. Basic techniques do not change finding someone you can relate too does as you gain experience turning.

http://www.woodturningvideos.com/
http://woodturningvideos.weebly.com/
http://www.turningtools.co.uk/videos/videos.html

Only real way to find out what works for you is just go for it. Videos are useful for some ideas but hard to find one working with same wood and tools you have and use.

-- Bill

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