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Jointing legs to slab

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Forum topic by watermark posted 01-31-2013 08:30 AM 1126 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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watermark

411 posts in 686 days


01-31-2013 08:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining

I am in the process of making a coffee table with a cross cut slab of Albizia about 3” thick similar to this table.

the table in the pic I used 4 biscuits to join each leg to the slab but I made it for my self so if the joint fails it just part of the learning curve the table I am making is to sell so I want to make sure I do it right. IS a biscuit jointer the right way to go about it or is there a better method.

Thanks for any help.

-- "He who has no dog, hunts with a cat" Portuguese proverb


11 replies so far

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1098 days


#1 posted 01-31-2013 08:40 AM

Honestly, I would think doweling would be a better way to go.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3579 posts in 2704 days


#2 posted 01-31-2013 04:37 PM

Mortise and tenon joinery will give ya a strong joint. Through wedged tenons might look cool.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Marcus's profile

Marcus

1080 posts in 763 days


#3 posted 01-31-2013 06:59 PM

I agree with both the posts…a through M&T joint would look very cool and a dowel would be a considerably easier and strong solution too.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1902 days


#4 posted 01-31-2013 07:03 PM

Yep, dowel or M&T for that one. Love the wedged tenon idea!

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View rockindavan's profile

rockindavan

285 posts in 1380 days


#5 posted 01-31-2013 08:38 PM

I have used dowels in a similar situation and it is still going strong. You could use multiple dowels for more strength. Just drill the holes you want in a piece of plywood then use that as a template for table and legs so the dowels line up correctly.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2966 posts in 1030 days


#6 posted 01-31-2013 08:59 PM

I’d use a colorful wood dowel even if I have to turn it myself. I’d use aluminum or steel dowels under the table to give strength where it would not show. In fact I’m designing my living room furniture out of 8/4 walnut and plan to use 8/4 on the legs which will be more of a teardrop design and plan on steel dowels to join it.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3503 posts in 1714 days


#7 posted 02-01-2013 02:38 AM

Dowels, big ones, or floating tenons.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View watermark's profile

watermark

411 posts in 686 days


#8 posted 02-01-2013 06:13 AM

Dowels it is… The wood I have for the legs is not long enough for the tenons. I have 3 more slabs from the same stump and plan on trying through mortise and tenon joints on the next one. Thanks for the advice.

-- "He who has no dog, hunts with a cat" Portuguese proverb

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112805 posts in 2321 days


#9 posted 02-01-2013 06:17 AM

If you have room for dowels you have room for a loose tenon.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View nwbusa's profile

nwbusa

1017 posts in 1030 days


#10 posted 02-01-2013 06:24 AM

If you have room for dowels you have room for a loose tenon.

Basically the same concept, just different shapes.

-- John, BC, Canada

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112805 posts in 2321 days


#11 posted 02-01-2013 06:30 AM

Yes and no, loose tenons can have much more mass to them than dowels have making them much stronger.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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