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What is the Best Way To Adjust a Roundover Bit in a Router?

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Forum topic by DavidNJ posted 01-30-2013 08:49 PM 914 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DavidNJ

387 posts in 681 days


01-30-2013 08:49 PM

I seem to have a rough time at this…too shallow or too deep.

There is a YouTube video that suggests making a deep cut in scrap, the setting it shallow and gradually adjusting back to it reaches the edge made in the first deep cut (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e66wfWaPjGU).

Is that the best way? Is there a better way?

Thanks,

David


8 replies so far

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3042 posts in 1175 days


#1 posted 01-30-2013 09:03 PM

His way works but seems like a lot of work to go to.

I usually just take a wooden straight edge and put it across the outside bottom of the insert, raise the bit until it just barely touches and go from there.

Starting with a piece of scrap, I can tell if there will be too much of a lip. If there is, I decide then to either lower a 64th or just sand it out when done. Besides, I normally sand off the routing that I’ve done to make a finer finish.

Just my way, YMMV. Objects in mirror are closer than they appear, Do Not stand above this step on ladder, if effects last more than 4 hours, shout Halleluiah!

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3445 posts in 1501 days


#2 posted 01-30-2013 09:39 PM

I use a straightedge on the router table. I don’t mind if I miss the last 1/32” of the roundover profile, but I don’t want to end up with a shoulder on my workpiece.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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GrandpaLen

1563 posts in 960 days


#3 posted 01-31-2013 03:19 AM

David,

Trial and error adjustments will get you there, once you are there, profile a scrap piece and save it for your next set-up.

For each profile bit that I have, I have the profile cut in a wood scrap, I usually save a 2” length and keep them in a plastic tool box in a drawer in my Router Table.

Saves time and frustration the next time you set that bit in the collet.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Grandpa Len.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View Tedster's profile

Tedster

2271 posts in 899 days


#4 posted 01-31-2013 03:41 AM

I use a straight edge like Dallas and Pintodeluxe. I like GrandpaLen’s idea too. That said, I find that I rarely get the bit exactly where I want it, simple because of minute variations of the wood. I prefer to leave a very slight, thinner than paper, lip that I can easily sand down. That way, as long as I can see that lip I know I’ve got the whole round-over. I always sand everything anyway, so taking that minute lip off is not an issue.

-- I support the 28th Amendment. http://www.wolf-pac.com/28th

View DavidNJ's profile

DavidNJ

387 posts in 681 days


#5 posted 01-31-2013 05:51 AM

Len, you are effectively doing what the video says, then keeping the sample as a jig to setup the bit the next time it is used. Is that correct?

There are some pieces I rather not sand, just go over with steel wool (00, 000, 0000). The finish on the cuts with the Hi-ATB blades are pretty good.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7733 posts in 2335 days


#6 posted 01-31-2013 06:15 AM

It’s tricky the way they are ground if you don’t want a
little rabbet there.

I haven’t tested this but I think a big square sub-base
might help control variations in critical cuts.

another idea is to lay a strip of tape on the router
base so the the router is tipped at the slightest
angle.

You can “dub off” the corners of a bit and eliminate
those pesky little micro-rabbets for good.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Puzzleman's profile

Puzzleman

341 posts in 1632 days


#7 posted 01-31-2013 12:21 PM

I use several different round over bits in my operation. Whenever we change them out, we use the method that GrandpaLen uses. Works every time and is quick.

Tighten the bit and lower it down. Put the template up against the guide and raise the bit till it just touches .
Boom. You’re ready to go.

-- Jim Beachler, Chief Puzzler, http://www.hollowwoodworks.com

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1563 posts in 960 days


#8 posted 01-31-2013 03:45 PM

David,
In order to answer your question…

”Len, you are effectively doing what the video says, then keeping the sample as a jig to setup the bit the next time it is used. Is that correct?”

...I had to come back and watch the Video.

Yes, basically that is what I do to sneak up on the profile that I’m looking for.
At times I think it would be cool to have an above the table adjuster (router lift) but for their cost I can make a couple trips to the Hardwood Lumber Yard and for my money that’s a better investment. Not to disparage the Router Lift equipment available today, if I were in a mass production situation it may save enough time to be beneficial.
Years ago I bought a Collet Extender when they 1st came onto the scene (and a couple of replacements over the years) that makes it quite simple to adjust with wrenches above the table.
With the profile samples from the box I save it’s not that time consuming to ‘work’ old school. :-)

...by the way, many of your bits, adjusted at different heights, render additional profiles and used in conjuction with other bits, offer complex profiles and when you do this and save the compound profile, with a note on the sample of which bits you used, that compound profile is quite easily reproduced.

Work Safely, keep asking questions and learning, and have Fun. – Grandpa Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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