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Poly over endgrain

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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 01-29-2013 08:13 PM 763 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

2954 posts in 951 days


01-29-2013 08:13 PM

I’m turning a covered two piece bowl with a lid out of flaming box elder and the top is shaped somewhat like a trumpet bell and is consequently end grain cut at an angle.

My question is, seeing how end grain sucks up poly, will it ever seal enough of the end grain to lay on top and give me a shine?

I should mention that I’m on my fourth coat and it’s still sucking it up.

I should also say that a coat for me is a session of about three wet downs with poly then I wait about an hour to do it again.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


15 replies so far

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Dallas

2963 posts in 1152 days


#1 posted 01-29-2013 08:28 PM

Sounds like you need to let it sit overnight and cure.

WB poly will cure in a couple of hours but Oil base will take all of 24 hours to cure completely.

Once it’s cured it will fill the grain. Another coat will fill more of the smaller holes in the grain and then you can start building your finish.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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RussellAP

2954 posts in 951 days


#2 posted 01-29-2013 08:33 PM

Thanks Dallas, I did however let it sit overnight after the first coat. I wonder if the following coat this morning loosened it up some. I should have sealed with shellac first.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Dallas

2963 posts in 1152 days


#3 posted 01-29-2013 08:38 PM

Even though the first coat cured and sealed some of the grain, it didn’t seal all of it. That’s why you use subsequent layers and let them cure after each coat.
With oil base if you only wait an hour between coats the fresh coat will just liquify the previous coat again and it will sink in more deeply.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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a1Jim

112143 posts in 2242 days


#4 posted 01-29-2013 08:41 PM

Next time sand the end grain to 800 grit or finer that helps seal the the end grain

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2954 posts in 951 days


#5 posted 01-29-2013 08:51 PM

I only went to 220g on this one. I have it sitting on a bench with a radiator heater just under the MDF so it should be nice and warm all night. This is really a beautiful piece.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1465 posts in 1026 days


#6 posted 01-29-2013 09:08 PM

Jim is correct in that finer sanding will tend to clog the end grain more, so that the finish won’t penetrate as deeply, but I don’t think going beyond 220 will make much difference.

Dallas is half right in that letting the initial coat cure will create a barrier to any deeper penetration, but once the poly starts to polymerize, it will not reverse the chemical reaction, or re-liquefy, by recoating.

You didn’t say how you’re applying it, but wiping it on will take a lot of coats to build to a gloss.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2954 posts in 951 days


#7 posted 01-29-2013 09:32 PM

Clint, due to the curve of the lid, I have to wipe it on. I’ll probably wait 5 or 6 hours and give it another wipe and let that sit overnight.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Wildwood

1053 posts in 799 days


#8 posted 01-29-2013 10:57 PM

You have to observe wait recoat instructions on can + or – based upon temp. I stopped using Minwax wipe on poly because could not get a build of finish no matter how long waited. Found out it was 70% MS so guess that was my problem.

Whether use oil or waterborne usually wait two or more hours between coats with light sanding between coats with 320 or 400 grit paper. I would let it dry without extra heat. Poly does not fully cure until couple three weeks.

I now make my own wipe on varnish/poly start with 50-50 mix of finish & thinner. Additional coats migh go 60% finish to 40% thinner. Prefer to stir not shake!

-- Bill

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2954 posts in 951 days


#9 posted 01-29-2013 11:15 PM

Bill, I think it’s a matter of sealing the end grain. I hate to darken it with shellac because it matches the bowl it covers. I’ll just have to wait this one out. Next time it’s shellac first.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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RussellAP

2954 posts in 951 days


#10 posted 01-29-2013 11:17 PM

What kind of finish do you use in your homebrew Bill. I like to keep things as light as possible with finishes.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1465 posts in 1026 days


#11 posted 01-30-2013 12:51 AM

Russell, try using Varathane oil poly thinned just enough (around 10%) to make it wipe able. Later coats may have to be thinned more, as polymerization proceeds pretty fast. If time between coats is kept to less than 10 hours, sanding between coats isn’t necessary. If it gets nubby, smooth them back with a maroon scotchbrite.

And for future projects, starting with shellac isn’t necessary or desirable, IMO. It just complicates the process. The first coat of anything will seal the pores, and guarantee compatibility.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10974 posts in 1355 days


#12 posted 01-30-2013 03:24 AM

Sanding to 600-800 was the only thing that worked for me (and I tried a lot of things!)

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1053 posts in 799 days


#13 posted 01-30-2013 12:17 PM

I have been using pint can of Minwax oil poly and either Mineral spirits or Naptha as thinner. I have and use a measuring cup to mix out enough for a project. Depending upon size of bowl two ounces of finish to two ounces of thinner gives me one or two coats. Normally stop applying finish after three or four coats.

Like pint size cans of oil finishes because of less waste. Normally ended up throwing away half of my quart cans. Like Naptha because seem less oily and dried little faster.

Have switch to using Rustoleum waterborne poly in quart can, no mixing and no wiping or brush marks. Had that problem with oil base 70-30 mix. Still on first quart can so not sure if and when product will go bad.

-- Bill

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RussellAP

2954 posts in 951 days


#14 posted 01-30-2013 03:33 PM

I let it set over night and this morning went over it with some 600g and reapplied the poly. Seems to be staying more on the surface today. I think I might get a shine out of it today.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

7009 posts in 1348 days


#15 posted 01-30-2013 03:48 PM

One trick I use with Poly. Wait until the “last” coat is just tacky to a fingertip. Then grab an old towel/T-shirt and buff the poly out,HARD! The more elbow grease used, the better the shine. If the finish is no longer tacky, it might not work this way. Put on the last coat, take a break, check on tacky feel. Buff/rub it out. Almost like a friction polish.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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