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Please help identify this finish

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Forum topic by jpmassey posted 540 days ago 1540 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jpmassey

1 post in 541 days


540 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question oak finishing

I’ve spent a couple years working in a custom cabinet shop, but we only did the woodwork. Thus, I’m a newb when it comes to finishing. I’m doing a kitchen for my house now, and will be doing everything myself. I found a picture of a finish I’d like to duplicate. Can anyone identify the finish/process?

It appears to be quarter sawn white oak, with hardly any color, but a very defined grain.


18 replies so far

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1380 posts in 957 days


#1 posted 540 days ago

It appears to have been stained and topped with a low sheen lacquer clear coat. Anything more specific than that would be pure speculation.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

3774 posts in 976 days


#2 posted 540 days ago

Looks like the grain has been filled with something dark, hard to say about the final finish.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View huff's profile

huff

2779 posts in 1881 days


#3 posted 540 days ago

It does look like they might of used a dark filler in the grain and you could use a Dull Rub Pre-catalyzed lacquer (around a 15 sheen), gives you the protection without the shine.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1112 posts in 2466 days


#4 posted 539 days ago

if you read the thread ” stain wont take “down about 1/2 way we talk about asphaltum, a stain made from basically a sort of tar, its been around for eons, I would suspect if you gave it a try then wiped it off the surface with some mineral spirits you would be quite close, this is similar to a pickleing process which is usually done with a white paint or stain,

you may want to do a first coat of oil, like a good oil/varnish a thin one like formbys or similar, this will prevent the stain from biting in hard and make it easier to wipe the surface off, just go easy and watch for wipe marks,

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1754 days


#5 posted 539 days ago

Yeah, this is a beautiful look. I concur with Charles…likely pickled with Asphaltum.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View ScottinTexas's profile

ScottinTexas

108 posts in 544 days


#6 posted 538 days ago

Like others have noted, looks like a dark pore filler to intentionally show up. Anyone know the name of this technique? My dad has spoken of a similar technique where you paint some open pore wood (I think) and then come back and fill in with some white stuff – I will have to ask him about that. It looks really neat.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1112 posts in 2466 days


#7 posted 537 days ago

Scottin its called pickleing ( sp) , became poplar in the 90’s, you could use white or any other color of latex paint wipe it on then wipe it off letting it hang in the pores and some would leave a light tint of the color on the surface

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2938 posts in 882 days


#8 posted 537 days ago

If it is Asphaltum, how’d they keep it out of those saw marks?

That’s a joke BTW.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1380 posts in 957 days


#9 posted 537 days ago

C’mon guys; it’s obviously a production piece out of a commercial shop, which is unlikely to use something as archaic and fussy/messy as asphaltum. It’s a straight stain and clear coat, without a filler.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1016 days


#10 posted 537 days ago

First off, it looks like rift-cut Oak, (hence the bold radial figure), which is NOT typical of a production piece. That makes me think perhaps it might be fumed with ammonia—no stain at all.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1205 posts in 668 days


#11 posted 537 days ago

DS IMO quarter sawn. To get the heavy figuring from the medullary rays, (flecking etc.) it is likely quarter sawn. Rift sawn has the same characteristics, but is cut further from the hart, where the rays are most prevelant, and has less prominent features. Although I doubt it is the case here, I have friends using “torching” to get effects like this. Burning the surface with mapp torches, and then sanding the wood back, leaving the dark grain, like staining and wiping fast, then sanding.

-- Who is John Galt?

View ScottinTexas's profile

ScottinTexas

108 posts in 544 days


#12 posted 537 days ago

Thanks, Charles. I was pleased to see you here. I appreciate your videos. I still have a lot to watch.

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

208 posts in 1239 days


#13 posted 537 days ago

JP….
Look at this link to American Woodworker .

I think this will give you some insight as to the steps which you can try on scrap.

PJ

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

View ScottinTexas's profile

ScottinTexas

108 posts in 544 days


#14 posted 537 days ago

Wow – PJ – thanks for the link. I think I could enjoy just finishing.

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

208 posts in 1239 days


#15 posted 530 days ago

@ ScottinTexas….
This may also be of interest to you…read my Blog: Finishing Tips #4: Gel Stain & Gel Varnish.

Have some fun with it, I am, and I hate to finish.

pj

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

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