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What joint would be best?

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Forum topic by StayinBroke posted 01-28-2013 03:25 AM 746 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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StayinBroke

53 posts in 656 days


01-28-2013 03:25 AM

I’m in the process of renovating my small shop in the interest of better organization. I’ve built a new workbench with a pegboard cabinet over it, (check out my blog for pics) and now I’m working on under bench storage. I’m planning to build 3 vertical drawers that will fit under the bench, with roller blade bearings on the bottom at the back to allow for full extension of the drawers. They will be similar to this. The dimensions of my vertical drawers are going to be roughly 25” deep, 27” tall, and 12” wide and are going to be constructed with 3/4 oak for strength. I’m having problems deciding on what joint would be best to connect the front, back, and side to the bottom of the vertical drawer. I was at first thinking about just rabbiting the edges of the bottom and glue and screw it all together, but don’t know if that would hold up to the job. I might end up using a tongue and dado instead for a little more strength. Or maybe a box joint. Thoughts and ideas? Thanks.

-- I'm just me.


11 replies so far

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gfadvm

11224 posts in 1376 days


#1 posted 01-28-2013 04:15 AM

Box joints would be the strongest option.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Rick M.

4118 posts in 1066 days


#2 posted 01-28-2013 04:33 AM

Are you asking how to build the pull out drawers? To answer the question I have to make some assumptions and I’m guessing you are not building DVD storage for your shop. Since you’ll be tugging and they will presumably be heavy, I would use through wedged tenons on the middle shelves for each drawer. The outside corners just use whatever drawer joint you prefer. A better description would help.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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oldnovice

3788 posts in 2053 days


#3 posted 01-28-2013 06:46 AM

I am on my tablet an I enlarged the image link you provided.

It appears that the most force will be at the top of the drawers since that is where the pulls are located and that is where the wider cross stretcher is attached. Therefore that joint should be the strongest. Box joint, dovetail, drawer lock, your choice depending on the type of material and don’t forget the glue!

IMO using some casters on the bottom as opposed to roller blade rollers would provide a better engineered load calculation as you can get fixed casters for up to 500 pounds each and nearly any choice of tire!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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StayinBroke

53 posts in 656 days


#4 posted 01-29-2013 04:02 AM

Rick, I have a pretty clear plan on how I want to build them, but am unsure what joints might be strongest for the job. I’m still pretty new to wood working so I thought i would take this opportunity to practice some joinery. I’ll be storing most of my hand tools in them so there will be a decent amount of weight in them. I’m planning a bin in the bottom with two shelves above that. The bottom bin will be where the heavy tool cases will go, with the shelves being for smaller items. A through wedge tenon in the back with the shelves sounds like it would offer a good amount of strength. Hmm, if I combine that with a dado in the side piece for the back of the shelf it would go a long way towards preventing the racking I’m worried about.

Oldnovice, yes, most of the force will be at the top so I figure the construction will have to be pretty sturdy to prevent any racking. I had thought of using castors but was trying to cut some costs by using the bearings. I think I may go with castors after all to prevent any headaches in the future. They would be easier anyway.

-- I'm just me.

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oldnovice

3788 posts in 2053 days


#5 posted 01-29-2013 04:08 AM

If you want to consider caster as in my opinion they have the best casters, selections, and prices, not to forget customer service too.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1536 days


#6 posted 01-29-2013 06:19 AM

It’s a little misleading to think of these as drawers. In a drawer the bottom supports weight but does not contribute much to anti-racking forces.

In this construction the bottom becomes a back and is critical to anti-racking. And, as noted, the corner joints, particularly the top outboard one, need to be reliant.

I would say, OP, to use the type of joint you want most to learn. Any will be strong enough. And then be sure the back is glued well.

And one last thought: the bigger the wheel, the easier it rolls.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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oldnovice

3788 posts in 2053 days


#7 posted 01-29-2013 06:26 AM

Lee is right on the wheels, the bigger the better … but don’t get carried away with P75×14”!

I changed from a 3” to a 5” and it made a great deal of difference on my rollaway cabinet!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Rick M.

4118 posts in 1066 days


#8 posted 01-29-2013 06:49 AM

It’s basically a rolling bookcase. You mentioned roller blade bearings, how are you planning on using them exactly?

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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StayinBroke

53 posts in 656 days


#9 posted 01-30-2013 02:36 AM

Lee, yea, it is pretty misleading to call it a drawer. With this, a side of the drawer becomes the bottom, and the bottom the back. I have been struggling with a proper name for it since I was presented with the idea, but I think Rick nailed it. It is more like a rolling book case than anything else. The corners of the back will be the most critical to anti-racking so those will have to be the strongest joints. After getting some ideas from those who have replied, and thinking of the size of the “drawers” I may use a combination of joints on the back to connect the sides and bottom to it. I’m thinking box joints in the corners for 6-8 inches or so, with a dado and tongue joint running between the box joints to add more stability and gluing surface. Using that combination along with through wedge tenons through the back for the shelves with dados in the side, I think would make these things nearly bomb proof.

Rick, I WAS thinking of using the roller blade bearings on the bottom in the back to act as a roller rather than try to slide them in and out on runners of some type. I would use them only in the back, with the front resting on feet to keep the drawers from creeping out during sanding, or chiseling, or whatever other type of vibration I’m inducing on the bench. BUT, now I’m thinking that the castor idea from old novice would work a lot better, instead of having to engineer supports for the bearings that could take the load of the tools. With a castor that part’s already handled by someone much more competent than I am.

-- I'm just me.

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oldnovice

3788 posts in 2053 days


#10 posted 01-30-2013 03:44 AM

StayinBroke in this application you can use fixed casters.

If you can calculate the weight of the assembly you can then divide that by the numbers of casters you are planning to use and select the caster based on that weight. I have seen application that use six fixed casters for proper weight capability!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Rick M.

4118 posts in 1066 days


#11 posted 01-30-2013 07:40 AM

Out of curiosity, what about skateboard wheels? They would be more expensive than casters but old skateboards are sometimes found at yard sales and thrift stores cheap.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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