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Forum topic by lexxx07 posted 01-25-2013 01:06 PM 546 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lexxx07

49 posts in 1052 days


01-25-2013 01:06 PM

Does anyone out there know how to use Bending Board or have ever used it


12 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6058 posts in 2182 days


#1 posted 01-25-2013 01:27 PM

There are several types and thicknesses for different applications. Some bend along the length and others across. Some can be finished directly and others are more of a utility grade that will require a veneer application.
The types I have used are readily bendable.
Do you have a distributor close by? The best thing would be to see the product in person to get an idea of which type would work for you.
I see from the map that you are, like me, a long ways from a city. I had to travel to Tucson to find any Bending Board, but it was worth the trip.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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huff

2810 posts in 2038 days


#2 posted 01-25-2013 02:37 PM

Gene covered it pretty well. It would be better if you could see it in person so you could better understand how it bends and what the surfaces look like. The picture in my avatar is a project I did with Bending Board.

I made a form to shape the bending board to so I could shape it and laminate the layers. I did two layers to form the outside shape and a third layer to make the inner shape for dividing the drawer openings. Once the layers where glue together and clamped and dried, I could remove the form and it kept it’s shape. I used Ambrosia Maple veneer for the exterior with solid Ambrosia Maple for the face frame, drawer fronts and back. Interior was painted black.

It’s pretty easy to work with and you can make some pretty tight curves with it if you “flex” it some before trying to fit it to a jig or form.

BTW. It’s a lot of fun trying to handle a 4×8 sheet of that stuff the way it bends. LOL.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

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Gene Howe

6058 posts in 2182 days


#3 posted 01-25-2013 07:51 PM

Geeze, John. You spoiled my fantasies. I thought you made that with your band saw. ;-) I was waiting to see that monster!

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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joeyinsouthaustin

1286 posts in 826 days


#4 posted 01-25-2013 08:01 PM

Used many types, and made my own by resawing kerfs in 1/4” ply and then laminating. Try it, you’ll like it. You do still have to account for some spring back, and start with a good mold. it will copy everything through when clamped properly.

The back section of this banquette is made up of bending plywood laminated to produce a compound radius. P.S. it is loose to act as a cushion backer. I hope to get the time to post on this project.

-- Who is John Galt?

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lexxx07

49 posts in 1052 days


#5 posted 01-26-2013 03:32 AM

Someone gave me a few pieces of bending board and i have know idea how to us it. I know what i would like to do with it but don’t know how. Help !!!!! is there a video or something

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joeyinsouthaustin

1286 posts in 826 days


#6 posted 01-26-2013 02:06 PM

You laminate it to hold a form, or apply it to a form. The form is usually made from cut ply wood sides and ribs going across. Often time a layer of bending plywood is laid over top of this to help finished project be smooth.
1: design a curved object
2: build a form to match the curved design
3: Apply the bending plywood to the form to get the thickness you want, with layers of glue between. It is often sold in 3/8” thicknesses, so you end up with 3/4” sheets.
4: clamp with a lot of clamps and cauls. sometimes strap clamps work for convex radii. When designing the form allow a little for spring back.
5: Remove clamps and proceed to finishing steps. you now have a curved object that will hold it’s shape.

here is a picture of the form used to make the bottom section of the banquet

-- Who is John Galt?

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joeyinsouthaustin

1286 posts in 826 days


#7 posted 01-26-2013 02:07 PM

It might help if you describe what you want to build?

-- Who is John Galt?

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lexxx07

49 posts in 1052 days


#8 posted 01-26-2013 03:28 PM

So you are layering the kerfing board. to the thickness desired

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joeyinsouthaustin

1286 posts in 826 days


#9 posted 01-26-2013 03:51 PM

yes, in that case it was bending ply wood, not kerfing board. That purpose of bending plywood, or kerfed board is to manufacture curved objects. By laminating them together they hold their shape. Or they can be applied to a backing structure. What are you trying to build??

-- Who is John Galt?

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lexxx07

49 posts in 1052 days


#10 posted 01-26-2013 05:43 PM

thinking of a curved reception desk

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lexxx07

49 posts in 1052 days


#11 posted 01-26-2013 05:44 PM

So what is the difference between bending plywood and kerfing board

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1286 posts in 826 days


#12 posted 01-26-2013 05:58 PM

In my understanding… Bending plywood is solid plywood where the grain is all oriented in the same direction. Often it is laid with a cloth or other substrate between the layers for stability. So with all the grain in the same direction it is quite flexible. Kerfed board can be bought or made. It is has kerfs cut partially in the back, up to a veneer or to the last layer of ply wood. this allows if to be bent as well. Kerfed board is usually applied to a backing sub straight, like the sub frame of a desk, or an arched cased passage opening. Bending ply is usually used for laminations, where the curve is the structure. I prefer bending ply wood. here is a you tube explanation of kerf board.

-- Who is John Galt?

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