LumberJocks

Wiped Varnish - Correct amount of time before turning a workpiece over

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by TonyD posted 01-23-2013 10:51 AM 579 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View TonyD's profile

TonyD

8 posts in 640 days


01-23-2013 10:51 AM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing

I have a silly question, and have searched quite a bit for an answer.

How long do I need to let the last coat of a wiped-on varnish (Fast dry thinned with equal parts Naptha) before I can safely flip the workpiece over and start building coats on the other side? It’s a door that I am working on.

I am building up about 10 coats of finish, over a span of about 3 days.

Any advice from those who have been working with wiped varnish is much appreciated!


11 replies so far

View huff's profile

huff

2804 posts in 1975 days


#1 posted 01-23-2013 01:20 PM

Tony,

Are you talking about lacquer or varnish? Big difference in products. I would guess you’re referring to a varnish (being wiped on and using Naptha for a thinner). It should tell you on the can what the drying time is for that manufacturer, but it will also have a lot to do with the temp. in your shop (or where ever you are doing your finishing). The colder it is the longer it will take to dry and cure out. 10 coats, even if applied very thin each time is quite a bit of finish. I would let it cure out at least 48 – 72 hours before I would want to flip it over and lay the finished side down.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View TonyD's profile

TonyD

8 posts in 640 days


#2 posted 01-23-2013 01:24 PM

Oh my, I am not sure where my head was at. You are correct, I am talking about varnish, not lacquer. I must have been researching another project when I made that post, sorry. Need more coffee, evidently. ;)

It is being applied in very thin coats (around 3 coats before I can safely sand it without risking sand-through).

Thanks, I will try a 48 hour period and see if that will work. I am wondering what the best way to support the newly finished side of the workpiece is… maybe those painter’s pyramids?

View huff's profile

huff

2804 posts in 1975 days


#3 posted 01-23-2013 01:34 PM

Tony,

I use the small painter’s pyramids a lot when I’m finishing, but you do have to be careful with heavier items because they will leave a indention in some woods. If I’m working on something like a big door or large panel, then I like to use two to three large dowels laid across my work table and lay the door or panel on those. I have a few old broom handles I keep just for that. They will support your door with very little contact to the surface.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View TonyD's profile

TonyD

8 posts in 640 days


#4 posted 01-23-2013 01:53 PM

Great, thanks for that information Huff, I appreciate the tips.

I actually have some of those “bench cookies” lying around that I might try to use, unless someone recommends against that.

View rrww's profile

rrww

263 posts in 803 days


#5 posted 01-23-2013 02:29 PM

I have had good luck with the dowels for larger stuff. I don’t like the bench cookies because the pattern indented my last work piece, I thought it was dry enough, but I could have been trying to rush it a little. It was a bummer sanding that out.

Good Luck!

View TonyD's profile

TonyD

8 posts in 640 days


#6 posted 01-23-2013 03:41 PM

Good to know, I will try the dowels instead of messing with the cookies, so I don’t risk it. Thanks!

View huff's profile

huff

2804 posts in 1975 days


#7 posted 01-23-2013 03:51 PM

rrww,

Been there, done that!............not with bench cookies, but rushing to finish and deliver a piece of furniture. Wrapped it up tight with a quilt and delivered it, only to unwrap and see the design of the quilt in the top of the furniture. Like you said, it’s a bummer sanding that out, not to mention embarrassing trying to explain what happened to my customer. lol

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View TonyD's profile

TonyD

8 posts in 640 days


#8 posted 01-23-2013 04:00 PM

Great idea Jonathan, I am considering doing that instead of risking the topcoat at all.

View huff's profile

huff

2804 posts in 1975 days


#9 posted 01-23-2013 04:17 PM

Jonathan,

Had to laugh at your last post, cause that’s exactly what I figured I would do…...trip over the dang leg of the saw horse. Sounds like we’ve been down the same road a few times. lol

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View TonyD's profile

TonyD

8 posts in 640 days


#10 posted 01-23-2013 04:35 PM

Considering my, well let’s say clumsy reputation, I guess I might not try that. This is a door with 9 glass panels.. ;)

View TonyD's profile

TonyD

8 posts in 640 days


#11 posted 01-24-2013 09:34 PM

Ok, here’s what I ended up doing. First off, the door is supported by 2 of those B&D molded sawhorses. At each of the four corners, I put just the tip of a 2” foam brush under the door, so that the plastic insert (tang-ish thing) of the foam brush does not touch the finish (you can tape the handle of the brush to the upright on the sawhorse to ensure it doesn’t contact the workpiece).

That raises the door up just enough to see light between the sawhorses and the workpiece.

It doesn’t seem that anything is printing or sticking to the finish.

Hopefully this helps someone else.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase