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Need advice orienting router plate in tablesaw extension

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Forum topic by mdoan posted 09-08-2008 08:39 PM 1139 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mdoan

32 posts in 2823 days


09-08-2008 08:39 PM

I want to add a router to the right side extension table of my table saw. Question is … which is the best orientation taking into consideration my unusual dust collection boom and the rotation of the router bit?

The pictures show three orientations, A,B, and C. What’s on the table are the cutting template for the router plate, the router plate itself (upside down in the pics), the two side rails to affix the fence, and the T-slot for the miter guage.

Orientation A

Orientation B

Orientation C

Any thoughts greatly appreciated.
-Michael

-- Wood Chopper


3 replies so far

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fredf

495 posts in 2465 days


#1 posted 09-09-2008 02:11 AM

Michael

Oh Boy,—that’s a tough one. I would normally prefer “B”, but working around the support for the guard/dust collector would be a bear, “C” adds working over the top of the fence to the support, and is even worse. If it were me I think “A” would be the way to go. If you need to route something with the fence further away, use the saw fence and work around the post. Another possibility would be “D”—build a separate router table if you have the room. Could always size to use as an out feed table

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

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mdoan

32 posts in 2823 days


#2 posted 09-09-2008 05:27 PM

Thanks Fred.

Can you explain the finer points of your decision? Why is B preferred?

Is number one concern the rotation of the router bit (right hand screw)? I agree that “B” is the predominant setup that I’ve seen from magazines and video. With this setup, one would feed stock from right to left into the rotation of the bit. Feeding left to right would mean a climb cut which required much more attention to safety.

Now “C” allows feeding stock “right to left” as well… except it’s more front of TS to back of TS. The standing position is awkward in that I can never follow the stock across the push as in “A” or “B”.

I guess what I need to ask are:
1) How much travel should the fence have relative to the bit? Forward of the bit is probably the biggest size bit I plan to route with, but how far back from the bit is “practical”?

2) How much table surface should there be in front of the bit, including T-slot for miter guages? Enough to raise the hypothetical cabinet door panel should suffice for most routing tasks?

3) What is the optimal operator position (for safety and feasibility)? Standing right of the bit and pushing stock left? Or standing right with the OPTION of following stock through the push? Or standing in front of the bit, facing the fence?

Sorry for all the detailed questions. I remember how much sweat it took to build that extension and how much easier it is to sink a hole in the wrong place.

-- Wood Chopper

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fredf

495 posts in 2465 days


#3 posted 09-09-2008 07:40 PM

Michael

I am far from being an expert by any means. the few times I used my router table before my son “borrowed” it (Hmmm I need to borrow it back) I worked from the front, which seems most natural to me, at least. I would hope that someone else could chime in here with comments. as far as the fence behind the bit, I wouldn’t try routing the front edge, but perhaps beads or dado’s or similar. too easy to get a kickback with the stock between the fence and the bit.

If you are working with large pieces, it is nice to have a large space in front to help balance the work on the table. if you are working with a small piece it is nice to have it close to the front. With the exception of your “post” you could just mount the fence on the other side of the bit and work from the other side of the table, and have the best of both worlds here . . . that I think is why I like the “D” idea of a seperate unit, you have full access to both sides so if you mount the plate off center you can either have it close to the front or further back depending on which side you mount the fence on. of course you wil probably need to mount t-track on both sides of miter slot. you can pass work through it from any side, even the end if you mount the fence the other way, so you could have a variety of setbacks, as long as you can mount your fence

Again I have only used mine a few times, and have not yet mounted it on my saw which I hope to at some point…note on a saw (without a guard like yours) you still have free access from 3 sides . . .

another thought. How easy is it to remove your guard (and associated post) if you want to use router table??

Let’s give Michael a few more points of view folks!!!

fred

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

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