LumberJocks

sanding problems

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by matthewcressey posted 01-21-2013 10:48 PM 837 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View matthewcressey's profile

matthewcressey

76 posts in 652 days


01-21-2013 10:48 PM

I have resently started making bowls on the lathe and I found that they need a lot f sanding so I ordered a ten pound box of mixed sandpaper. When it came in and i tried it out that some of it is absolute junk. And I was wondering why that was its aluminum oxide paper why is it so terrible? Also what kind of paper do you use?


6 replies so far

View TheDane's profile (online now)

TheDane

3810 posts in 2330 days


#1 posted 01-21-2013 11:21 PM

I have come to really appreciate the ‘Blue Flex Discs’ from Vince Welsh ( http://vinceswoodnwonders.com/blue-flex-discs/ ). They do an excellent job, and last a long time.

I use them with backup pads and interface pads, also from Vince.

I use the 2 3/8” discs, starting with either 80 or 120 grit and work up to 800 grit.

Sometimes I power sand with a drill, but most often just use a self-powered sander that I made with bushings and magnets I bought from Eddie Castelin ( http://www.eddiecastelin.com ).

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View matthewcressey's profile

matthewcressey

76 posts in 652 days


#2 posted 01-22-2013 12:41 AM

how much can you do with one disk? im currently doing it by hand with strips and im going through almost a half a sheet on the lower grits.

View TheDane's profile (online now)

TheDane

3810 posts in 2330 days


#3 posted 01-22-2013 01:23 AM

The blue discs don’t load up. You will eventually wear the abrasive off, but that takes a lot of sanding.

I have done a couple of bowls and dozens of pens with a single set. If you don’t tear them up and brush the swarf off between coats, they last a long time.

FWIW, I keep a natural bristle brush (cheap ‘chip brush’ from Menards) to brush the swarf off the sandpaper and the workpiece between grits. IMHO, this improves results for the same reason you get better results wet-sanding.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View matthewcressey's profile

matthewcressey

76 posts in 652 days


#4 posted 01-22-2013 01:33 AM

good i might get some of this

View lew's profile

lew

10061 posts in 2422 days


#5 posted 01-22-2013 04:20 AM

You might check out these folks-
http://www.supergrit.com/
Their prices and service are excellent.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1060 posts in 802 days


#6 posted 01-22-2013 02:09 PM

I also use blue discs, backup & interface pads from Vince in angle drill.

Buy, 9×11 aluminum oxide, stearate, and garnet sheets from these folks. Have never bought their bargain box sandpaper.

http://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/sh33500/

Could not fine an outstanding You-Tube video on power sanding with discs, but there is a definite learning curve to it.

Quality sandpaper makes a world of difference. When sanding on the lathe turn speed to lowest RPM’s, higher RPM’s ruin your sandpaper, burnish the wood, and highlight sanding scratches and tool marks. When sanding if paper gets hot to hold you ruined it.

My goal when turning is get an off the tool finish. No, do not always achieve my goal. I look at my damage and decide what grit paper to use. So do not always start sanding with 80 grit paper. Have spent a lot of time removing sanding scratch marks from 80, & 100 grit paper. Really hurts having to remove scratches after applied finish.

Depending upon finish going to use determines highest grit will use. Oil, oil/varnish will sand to higher grit, film finish use manufacturer’s recommendation. If used a film finish will finish the finish wet sanding & polishing with micromesh. If used stearate paper will wipe with paper towel before apply any finish.

Will have alter sanding sequence depending upon wood species, oily, softwood, & hardwood. I define it further by open or close grain wood too.

There are some modest modifications to what saying here, lot depends upon wood, finish used, and sanding between coats of finish.

-- Bill

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase