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Cove cuts for raised panels

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Forum topic by Wally331 posted 537 days ago 1063 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Wally331

217 posts in 610 days


537 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: raised panel cabinet shaper router moulding sash jig tablesaw shaping joining

Hi LJ’s! I was looking at way to create raised panels cheaply as I can’t dish out a hundred or so dollars for a set of router/shaper bits. My question is, has anyone ever used the table saw set up to cut a cove, to cut the profile around the edge of a raised panel?

I think this could be a great solution for raised panels, and the frame shouldn’t be too hard, a couple of rabbets and ogee profile and I should be set. Whats your opinion on this idea?


7 replies so far

View Lifesaver2000's profile

Lifesaver2000

501 posts in 1697 days


#1 posted 537 days ago

Here is a step by step for cutting cove raised panels on a table saw:

http://woodworking.about.com/od/woodworkingplansdesigns/ss/CoveCabinetDoor.htm

That also has instructions for making the frame for the doors, but near the end it gets into the raising of the panels.

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

431 posts in 963 days


#2 posted 537 days ago

You can read my thread about my issues and how I solved them here:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/44770

Essentially, I took a straight bit to cut the “shoulder” and then used a cove bit to “raise the panel. Worked out very nicely I think.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15278 posts in 1452 days


#3 posted 537 days ago

You can also cut a straight raised panel with hand planes. So people who don’t have any power tools yet have a way to do it to. Of course many craftspeople choose to do it this way anyways.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Wally331's profile

Wally331

217 posts in 610 days


#4 posted 536 days ago

Wow thanks guys! Didn’t know this was already an idea, I should’ve done some searching first. Thanks for the videos, I can’t wait to watch.

@helluvawreck – Thanks, I’ve seen I think Paul Sellers cut the straight raised panels by hand also, It works out pretty well with a bit of practice. Im sure that you could easily make a cove-cut raised panel by hand with a hollow moulding plane, but I don’t have any yet ;)

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

889 posts in 610 days


#5 posted 536 days ago

You can also use a “Safe T Planer” on either a radial drill press or a RAS. By tilting the tool head a few degrees you get a cove type cut. You vary the profile by the amount of tile. I did this many years ago to build my roll top desk, using a radial drill press. It does call for a lot of sanding.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1221 posts in 534 days


#6 posted 524 days ago

http://www.woodline.com/p-1772-3-piece-raised-panel-door-set-with-undercutter.aspx
woodline has great bits for the money
this is a whole set for $89
vertical bit for $43
3 1/4 for 62.

really the set is the best bang for the buck

I have a set of their moulding cutters and they have held up great

View Loren's profile

Loren

7161 posts in 2233 days


#7 posted 524 days ago

Well, all you need is a raised panel bit… not a whole
set.

The issue with doing them on the table saw is
you’ll have to do a lot of sanding to get rid of
the machine marks.

There are moulding heads for table saws. They
aren’t expensive and not a lot of people like to
use them anymore, but they work and you can
do some very creative things with them.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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