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Forum topic by boxcarmarty posted 01-20-2013 07:40 PM 1024 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boxcarmarty

9686 posts in 1078 days


01-20-2013 07:40 PM

I’m looking for opinions on mounting glass in doors and/or framework. Usually I would use a bead of silicone or frame it in with quarter round. I recently had a fellow woodworker recommend these clips, but I’m not sure they are all that practical.

While they appear better then other clips that I have worked with, They seem to be bulky and any bump to the clip or to much pressure can break the glass. (yes I can verify that)

I am interested in which clips or methods others have used and the goods and bads of it all…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....


31 replies so far

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Bogeyguy

482 posts in 786 days


#1 posted 01-20-2013 07:56 PM

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DIYaholic

14056 posts in 1393 days


#2 posted 01-20-2013 08:06 PM

Duct Tape. It now comes in designer colors!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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Wdwerker

333 posts in 951 days


#3 posted 01-20-2013 08:08 PM

I use Lexcel clear caulk to glue the glass in after the door frame is finished. A few glazing points hole the glass in place, caulk all the way around and clean up/ smooth out the bead with mineral spirits/ paint thinner. Lexcel is not silicone, it never lets loose! Takes a few days to fully cure . No rattle at all. Stays flexible.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

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boxcarmarty

9686 posts in 1078 days


#4 posted 01-20-2013 08:13 PM

Wdwerker, Thanks for the tip on Lexcel. I’ll check it out…..

Randy, I knew I could count on your 2 cents. I’ll be waiting for my money’s worth…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

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William

9207 posts in 1560 days


#5 posted 01-20-2013 10:08 PM

I always just put glass in with quarter inch by quarter inch strips that I attach behind the glass with a 23ga pin nailer.
If it is going somewhere like an external door or window, I’ll add silcone first.
I never glue the strips though. I just tack them in. They stay put, but are easy to remove if I ever need to replace the glass.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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Dave

11189 posts in 1558 days


#6 posted 01-20-2013 10:42 PM

Marty I haven’t mounted glass in years, other than in picture frames. I use glazing points for that. I wouldn’t know where to start. I am interested in finding out what you pick. Good luck.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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boxcarmarty

9686 posts in 1078 days


#7 posted 01-20-2013 11:37 PM

Dave, I usually just use silicone to glue the glass in and probably continue to do so. I was just curious as to what others used. The Lexel that Wdwerker mentioned sounds like it’s worth looking into…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

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William

9207 posts in 1560 days


#8 posted 01-20-2013 11:47 PM

I’m curious.
This is the third time in the last week I’ve seen the subject come up about glass, and several people saying they glue it in with silicone.
My question is,
Do you put it between the frame and glass, like glue?
Or do you run a bead on the backside of the glass, which dries and traps the glass between the wood and the bead of silicone?
I’ve seen it done both ways depending on the type of silicone used.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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Wdwerker

333 posts in 951 days


#9 posted 01-20-2013 11:52 PM

I have seen Lexcel at Lowes in a hand squeeze tube. I get mine from a hardware store in a caulk tube for under $9 .
If you seal it up with one of those caulk tip condom things it lasts a long time. Been using Lexcel for over 25 years., never had it fail. Can anyone say that for silicone? If the glass breaks you can razor knife the clear caulk to clean out the chips. I do not put the caulk under the glass, just around the edges . You can read the label thru the clear tube and caulk .
Biggest draw back is the few days to completely harden, which is why I use a few glazing points to hold the glass in place.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

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Wdwerker

333 posts in 951 days


#10 posted 01-20-2013 11:52 PM

Oops double posted

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

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boxcarmarty

9686 posts in 1078 days


#11 posted 01-21-2013 12:23 AM

William, I use it on the edge and top of the glass to hold it in place when it dries….

Wdwerker, I seen it was available in the small tube as well as the caulking tube. I’ll check Lowes and Menards around here…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View eddie's profile

eddie

7493 posts in 1332 days


#12 posted 01-21-2013 12:24 AM

last window i did was some kind of clear plastic pane just brads on the edge

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

View Tedster's profile

Tedster

2271 posts in 929 days


#13 posted 01-21-2013 01:06 AM

I set the glass in place then run a bead of silicone around it and let it dry. Then I cover that with 1/4 round or any suitable strip of wood. Brads only, no glue.. in case I ever have to replace it. I do the silicone after setting the glass in place so I can cut it free if I have to.

That lexel works great too, but I only use that when it might be visible. I like how clear it is. It’s a polyurethane caulk that smells like model cement, and melts plastic like model cement too. Found that out when I used it on some plexiglass. There are other brands besides Lexel, but I think Lexel is the brand that made it popular.

A little story about glass and silicone caulk. Some years ago I went to remove a mirror that was glued to a door. Rather than trying to get a flexible scraper back behind the mirror, I figured I could just break the mirror to pieces, then scrape the pieces off the door. I whacked it right in the middle with my hammer and nuthin.. not a crack, not even a chip. So I hit it a few more times, and then a few more. I figured maybe it wasn’t glass at all, but maybe acrylic or something… but no, it was glass. And no matter how much I hammered away at it, that darn mirror would not crack! Turns out the beads of silicone behind it, about every few inches, was actually absorbing the shock. What finally worked is I used a glass cutter to score it, then it would break at the score.

Anywayz, that just goes to show how a bead of silicone not only prevents the glass from rattling… it can also help prevent it from breaking. I’m not sure polyurethane caulk has the same properties.. I think probably not but it might.

-- I support the 28th Amendment. http://www.wolf-pac.com/28th

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boxcarmarty

9686 posts in 1078 days


#14 posted 01-21-2013 01:21 AM

Thanks eddie…..

Thanks Ted, It sounds like the old fashion way is the best way…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

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Tedster

2271 posts in 929 days


#15 posted 01-21-2013 01:28 AM

who you callin old?

-- I support the 28th Amendment. http://www.wolf-pac.com/28th

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