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Help me with cedar

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Forum topic by joeyinsouthaustin posted 555 days ago 1604 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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joeyinsouthaustin

1213 posts in 674 days


555 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question finishing cedar

I need to find a finish or oil that is compatible with cedar. Client would like a wet or oiled look, but not too glossy. I know that many finishes react with cedar, so I thought I would tap into the LJ brain trust on this one. This entire house is western red cedar, inside and out. They want to do the inside, so needs to be compatible with interior life.

-- Who is John Galt?


31 replies so far

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Jim Finn

1641 posts in 1523 days


#1 posted 555 days ago

I use lacquer on cedar.

-- In God We Trust

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joeyinsouthaustin

1213 posts in 674 days


#2 posted 555 days ago

the client has refined their idea. they want to “refresh the wood” it is 40 years old in the raw, and they feel it is dry looking, and want it to look “fresh cut” this may not be possible. Still interested in thoughts. It does look like some type of lacquer has been used on the exterior.

-- Who is John Galt?

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Moron

4666 posts in 2495 days


#3 posted 555 days ago

any furniture grade oil sold in laymen’s stores will work, so will the urethanes which I am not a fan of but some folks are.

Oils are good for high traffic areas as the are easy to repair, easy to apply but they do require maintenance. Urethanes (I repeat I do not like them) have some elasticity to them and on cedar, a rather soft and dentable wood, soft, allows for some forgiveness but its slow going application techniques are hindering

lacquer on cedar is perfect so long as you know it isnt subject to even the slightest bruise as each bruise leaves fractures on the finish so personally I would use a high end marine varnish, perhaps and maybe add more flexibility to the varnish by an adding oil, a catalyst and some thinner…….its the best of all worlds

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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joeyinsouthaustin

1213 posts in 674 days


#4 posted 555 days ago

moron I agree on lacquer… it is not appropriate for the interior. too much traffic and will prolly end up looking to glossy. The original idea from the home owners was a wax. I just am not experienced enough to know what waxes or products like that would react with cedar. I thing an oil is the way to go, because they are looking to revitalize more than finish the wood. A wax would be a bear on the texture of this cedar. It is a very unique house, and client. So the question is what oil is best matched to ceday.

-- Who is John Galt?

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JesseTutt

795 posts in 712 days


#5 posted 555 days ago

Somewhere I have seen cedar oil that is supposed to make the wood look good and restore (add) the cedar smell.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

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gfadvm

10586 posts in 1292 days


#6 posted 555 days ago

Are we talking rough cedar here? Or planed but unfinished smooth surface?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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joeyinsouthaustin

1213 posts in 674 days


#7 posted 555 days ago

cedar oil appears to restore the smell of cedar. Does anyone know if it refreshes the wood. The home owners keep talking about how there teak table looks after they oil it to keep it from drying out

-- Who is John Galt?

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bandit571

6675 posts in 1285 days


#8 posted 555 days ago

I have always used three coats of Minwax Gloss Poly, brushed on. I only finish the outside of a Cedar Chest, if it is solid cedar. I never finish cedar that is inside, like a liner.

The outside of a chest, made of solid Red Aromatic Cedar.

and a look under the lid.

No need for a fancy oil. Just some sandpaper. Sand the exposed cedar to bring the aroma right back. Leave the 220 grit nearby.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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joeyinsouthaustin

1213 posts in 674 days


#9 posted 555 days ago

gfadvm and all. This is rough cedar, and years have made it rougher. The home is an all cedar construction. There is NO drywall in this home. The same siding that was used on the outside was used to finish the inside. Even the cabinets are made from cedar. I think the original owner, who built the home, might have liked cedar. Cost does not seem like an object to these folks, but I want to get a good suggestion for them.

-- Who is John Galt?

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Moron

4666 posts in 2495 days


#10 posted 554 days ago

do it

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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joeyinsouthaustin

1213 posts in 674 days


#11 posted 554 days ago

bandit571 I like the comment, but do you have a picture that shows more of the finished side. They are quite concerned about the “sheen” factor. It appears you answer the question that polyurethanes don’t react with cedar and discolor, so I assume that I could do a matte type finish. Have you experience with that?

-- Who is John Galt?

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joeyinsouthaustin

1213 posts in 674 days


#12 posted 554 days ago

Moron I would like to avoid urethanes. There are a lot of reasons why, and I think you know, what oils do you suggest. I would like to know what oils could potentially react with the cedar.

BTW: All is currently unfinished in any way.

-- Who is John Galt?

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bandit571

6675 posts in 1285 days


#13 posted 554 days ago

I have a few more such pictures in my Projects pages. I prefer gloss, but one could knock down the shine if it is wanted. Poly will Darken the red, making it stand out more. The “white” sap wood will turn a yellow. If one uses the water-borne poly, no changes in colour happen. All depends on what look you are after.

Note: On that chest, it took two coats just to get a shine. i had to sand again, and add a third coat. The wood came from an old tree on a friend’s property. He had it rough sawn into 2×8 x 12’ planks, I did a lot of resawing to get things down to what is shown. I only used three of those old planks.

The biggest problem with this wood IS the oil in it. It will affect the glue-ups. I will leave thing open to let it “air dry” as i work with it. Of course, the shop does smell pretty good, for a few days.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Moron

4666 posts in 2495 days


#14 posted 554 days ago

why do resumes determine pay scales ?

why does word of mouth travel faster then the digital world ?

how many square ft of wood are we talkn about ?

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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Moron

4666 posts in 2495 days


#15 posted 554 days ago

its fundamentally important to realize not just your own limits but those to whom surround you

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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