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A question: what is the difference between a Jointer and a Jointer/Planer?

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Forum topic by FeralVermonter posted 537 days ago 1345 views 1 time favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FeralVermonter

100 posts in 555 days


537 days ago

OK, so for the last two weeks I’ve been inching along on restoring an old Delta jointer.

I have a few questions that I haven’t been able to find answers for, probably because they’re the sort of questions that only the newest of newbies would ask…

Basically, I am wondering if I can use my jointer as a planer too, and if so how. And if not… why not?


27 replies so far

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2092 posts in 772 days


#1 posted 537 days ago

The short answer is no. A jointer flattens one face (or edge), but to make the opposite face flat and parallel, you need to use a planer.

Some people seem to use the term “jointer-planer” when they really mean “jointer”. Then there are the European style combination machines that actually are the two machines in one.

To make an opposite edge parallel, you wouldn’t use a planer, rather you’d run the piece thru your table saw. You don’t want to run a board thru a planer on its edge as it would not be stable oriented that way.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15247 posts in 1450 days


#2 posted 537 days ago

There are no stupid questions. Dwight pretty much has it right. The most important thing of all is put your heart into it, have fun, and don’t give up. May you always be happy in your work.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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a1Jim

111999 posts in 2161 days


#3 posted 537 days ago

I think it has to do with what generation your from .I have a friend that’s in his 80s and he calls a jointer a jointer planner. In essence you can plan with a jointer but just face plan not thickness plan.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Loren's profile

Loren

7154 posts in 2232 days


#4 posted 537 days ago

You can thickness with a jointer. I’m aware of 2 ways
to do it.

1. build an elaborate jig like the planer attachment similar
to the one used on the INCA 410.

I have some plans around somewhere of such a jig. I bought
them on ebay some years ago. They were torn from an
old handyman magazine from the 1960s.

2. Use the method developed by Tage Frid and described
in an old Fine Woodworking issue.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

792 posts in 694 days


#5 posted 537 days ago

If you did not have a planer, could you use a router sled? Similar to how you flatten cutting boards.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2161 days


#6 posted 537 days ago

Yes after jointing one side.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Loren's profile

Loren

7154 posts in 2232 days


#7 posted 537 days ago

Yeah, but it’s pretty slow.

There’s also something called a safe-t-planer which
you chuck into a drill press attach to the auxiliary
arbor on a radial arm saw.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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a1Jim

111999 posts in 2161 days


#8 posted 537 days ago

You can also do it the old fashion way with hand planes ,some folks prefer to do it that way.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5354 posts in 1959 days


#9 posted 537 days ago

double post…see below

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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knotscott

5354 posts in 1959 days


#10 posted 537 days ago

Two different tools, with different primary functions, though there are some similarities. The jointer’s primary job is to flatten a reference face, and then an adjacent 90° edge to that face…..everything other aspect of dimensioning lumber references to that flat face and squared edge.

A planer essentially makes the opposite face parallel to the bottom face, and produces a consistent thickness across the length of a board…note that it doesn’t flatten a board per se…a board that’s twisted will come out twisted, but thinner. A planer needs a flat board face to reference from so it it can make that opposite face parallel to the reference face. With the help of a planer sled to substitute as a reference face, a planer can be coaxed into flattening an opposite face.


It’s worth noting that some people skip the flattening of a face and do edge jointing using a table saw or a router, but without a reference face, the ensuing 90° edge isn’t uniformly 90° to the entire face….it’s random.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3031 posts in 1259 days


#11 posted 537 days ago

I agree with a1Jim. The generation you come from means a lot. I was taught to call them jointer/planers because they do plane a face flat. They don’t thickness plane. We also learned to call sabre saws….sabre saws. today those are jig saws. We were taught that a jig saw powers a blade. much like a coping saw blade, from the lower end. Today we use smaller, thinner, blasdes on a lighter machine and call it a scroll saw. They are different than jig saws but similiar. Drills are those devices with flutes that you put into the chuck of a drill motor. First the public misuses terms then the marketing people go with them.
I was also taught that wood filler was used for filling grain in the wood before finishing. Wood repair was used for filling holes in he wood.

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 1448 days


#12 posted 537 days ago

There seems to be contradictory posts in this topic. My understanding is you can joint one edge,
and plane one face of a board on the jointer. Now if you can do one face, why can’t you do both ?

I think I missed something.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5354 posts in 1959 days


#13 posted 537 days ago

My understanding is you can joint one edge, and plane one face of a board on the jointer. Now if you can do one face, why can’t you do both ?

The jointer can make both faces of a board flat, but it can’t make them parallel to each other….you usually end up with a wedge if you try. The planer makes the other face parallel to the one flattened on the jointer.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

792 posts in 694 days


#14 posted 537 days ago

You can flatten both faces of a piece of wood on a jointer, assuming the board’s width is less than the width of the jointer. What you cannot do is make the two faces parallel (same thickness).

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2161 days


#15 posted 537 days ago

The difference is that a planner is made to plane parallel to the jointed face,if you joint both sides ,both sides will be flat but not necessarily parallel to each other.In other words the board may not be of equal thickness just jointing each side.

sorry I guess we were all typeing at the same time.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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