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First Plane... YEAH... Now, how do I fix it?

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Forum topic by ToddJB posted 552 days ago 869 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ToddJB

1697 posts in 728 days


552 days ago

I just picked up my first hand plane last weekend. It’s in pretty good condition. It’s a Stanley #5. The sole is really flat, the jappaning is all there and in great condition. The lever cap has a chip off the corner (pictured below).

The four main questions I have are these:

1 – The tote is split and someone along the way used, what appears to be super glue to crap glue it back together. It is not aligned very well. Also the hole that the front tote screw goes threw broke out the front and they also glue it back very poorly. How would you go about fixing this? Is there an easy way to delaminate the glue so I can re-glue properly?

2 – The long tote bolt has goobered threads. What is the thread size so I can tap the bolt and hole for smooth threading?

3 – Would you sand the tote and knob down and BLO it?

4 – Any idea what year this guy might be?

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built


13 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15653 posts in 2816 days


#1 posted 552 days ago

It’s a newer model. From what I can see in the photos, I would guess a Type 19, manufactured between 1948 and 1961.

If the glue is holding solid, I wouldn’t mess with it. Sanding all the wood down and putting an oil finish or shellac on it will make it look a lot better. Personally, I just power buff and wax them after stripping the old finish off.

Thread size I’m not sure of off the top of my head. But again, if you can get the thing threaded and tightened, there’s no need for it to be silky smooth.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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bandit571

6642 posts in 1281 days


#2 posted 552 days ago

Thread size: was a #12×20 that Stanley used. I have had a plane or two that I’ve had to re-tap to 1/4” x20. Rear tote? Use it. You can keep an eyeball peeled for a “fresh” one. You could use the old one as a pattern, and make a new one.

Tote; (again) One could sand down the bad areas, and re-install the tote. Watch taking the long bolt out. These sometimes get bent, and lead to breaking the tote. maybe a wire wheel in the grinder, or drill press can chase the threads a bit. Also, IF the long bolt is a two piece thingy, with a brass nut at the top? Reverse the bolt, and put the “good” threads into the base of the plane. The brass is a little more forgiving than cast iron. One could even grind down the threads, and epoxy the brass end back on to it. Would make it a one piece bolt.

Sharpen the iron up, and try it out..

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Dan's profile

Dan

3543 posts in 1478 days


#3 posted 552 days ago

I agree with Charlie.. That is a later type 19? probably from the 1950’s.

If its a poor glue job on the tote you can just break it and redo the fix. If it is just super glue it shouldn’t take much force to snap it in half. After you break it go in with a chisel/plane or sanding block and sand both ends of the tote flat. This way when you glue back together you will have a nice tight fit with no gaps. When you glue back together masking tape is all the clamping pressure you will need as long as both ends of the break are nice and flat.

As for refinishing the handles. If the tote and knob on your plane is a stained hardwood then I would suggest sanding and restaining before applying a finish coat.. If they are rosewood then BLO would be fine. Hard to tell from the photos what wood they are.

Here are a few pics of a fix I did using this method.

Tote with poor glue fix job

After I snapped it back in two

After both ends were sanded flat

Glued back together then sanded down.. Cant even tell it was ever broke.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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Don W

14616 posts in 1165 days


#4 posted 552 days ago

I agree. Your’s doesn’t look as bad as Dan’s, so I’d try just sanding it if its solid, if not Dan’s advice is solid. I like using epoxy on rosewood, I’ve has a couple rebreak using just titebond.

You can use BLO or just wax to finish. BLO tends to darken it some, but its rosewood, It looks good no matter what you do.

As for the bolt, I again agree with Charlie, they have to be pretty bad to not be able to use them.

One additional note, if the bolt is bent, it may be bent for a reason. They did that purposely to adjust the angle of the threading. If it was off, that’s what cause the tote to break. Its easy to check. Set the tote along side the bolt threaded into the plane and make sure they line up.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View ToddJB's profile (online now)

ToddJB

1697 posts in 728 days


#5 posted 552 days ago

Thanks to the tips, guys. Note the other break in the last picture. Where the short bolt goes through the tote. You’ll see that the front was broken out and reglued about 1/8” off. This seems to allow for slop even when the bolt is tightened down. What would you suggest for this?

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

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ToddJB

1697 posts in 728 days


#6 posted 552 days ago

Also, is the 50’s past the golden age of these planes? At what point do these go from superior tools to the $25 dollar ones at Lowes?

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

View Don W's profile

Don W

14616 posts in 1165 days


#7 posted 552 days ago

its definitely not the original bolt. You could add a washer or shorten the bolt.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Don W

14616 posts in 1165 days


#8 posted 551 days ago

they started going downhill around 1940, but were still decent up till about the 60’s. After that not so much.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15653 posts in 2816 days


#9 posted 551 days ago

Don’t let any plane snobs discourage you…. this may not be the most highly sought-after vintage for collectors, but it will make a darned fine user once you get it tuned up.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9575 posts in 1216 days


#10 posted 551 days ago

It’s not ‘golden age,’ but a fine tool with adjustable frog. The complete package! Bring it back into fighting shape and enjoy!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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BentheViking

1746 posts in 1161 days


#11 posted 551 days ago

woodworking is about what you get out of it and not what others say you should get out of it…so if the plane works right and does what you need it to do then it really doesn’t matter how old it is…just make some shavings

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

9575 posts in 1216 days


#12 posted 551 days ago

I don’t know who the plane snobs are that are discouraging you, Todd, but I agree with Charlie: Don’t let them.

(editing for clarity)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View mandatory66's profile

mandatory66

91 posts in 728 days


#13 posted 551 days ago

I have a type 19 #4 that I tuned up and popped in a new Lie Nielsen iron. Can cut .001 shavings all day long.
I LN blade made a large improvement.

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