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Forum topic by TheDane posted 540 days ago 3590 views 13 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheDane

3627 posts in 2246 days


540 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: jig lathe sharpening belt sander

This is based on a rig that was detailed in AAW’s publication (American Woodturner, December 2012, Vol. 27 – No. 6).

It is a Harbor Freight 4” x 36” belt sander that sells for around $70. With a 20% off coupon, I paid under $60 for it … considering the cost of all of the other parts I have a total investment of under $100 in this little project.

LJ HorizontalMike did a review ( http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3179 ) that is spot on, so this post is just a different view of what he did and his observations.

I am always in search of a way to get sharper tools and faster results, so this caught my attention. I can sharpen and hone most of the tools in my kit in under 10 seconds.

I’ll be using this with my existing OneWay Vari-Grind …

... set in a ‘pocket’ that I turned and mounted on hardware salvaged from the HF sander

The 1st tool holder I made for the T-track is designed to use with my skews …

... and is loosely based on the skew jig that OneWay produces.


The roughing gouge can either be used in the tool holder I made for skews …


, or in a smaller holder …


One of the most attractive features (to me) is the onboard buffing wheel. Takes just a few seconds to buff the freshly ground edge to a mirror shine.

One area of concern I have is the drive belt. To get the sanding belt to move away from the tool instead of into it, you need to twist the belt into a figure-8, and reset the motor at an angle to provide some relief on the belt.

Despite this, the belt rubs on itself, and will wear so it will be interesting to see how long the belt lasts.

A word of caution to anyone building this … unless the 1/2” arbor you use to secure the buffing wheel to the machine had left-handed threads, make sure you either double-nut it or use a lock nut. My arbor is a right-handed thread, and while I was buffing my first tool, the nut came off and various parts became airborne (still haven’t found one of the fender washers that went sailing).

One shortcoming that I need to address is the lack of platform for grinding scrapers, etc. For now, I’ll continue to use my 8” grinder and figure out a way to mount a platform on the T-track, or perhaps adapt HorizontalMike’s tool-holder design. Stay tuned.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"


34 replies so far

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HorizontalMike

6906 posts in 1497 days


#1 posted 539 days ago

Gerry,
I am thinking that your Oneway Vari-Grind can adjust for your scraper. But now owning that one, I am guessing. FWIW, I am still struggling with the sharpening the cutoff. I can turn it on its edge and sharpen, but that is not doing as well as I had hoped. May just need a straight platform, or one set at 85-89 degrees. this one should not be that difficult.

BTW, I pulled these numbers off of the belt: RP 0511 1203
The 1/2in wide belt seems to be about 10” long folded, may a bit less. I am going to hunt around locally for a spare.

Nice holders for your skews. I probably could have made mine a bit wider to match that angle. Hey, do let me know how that socket on a rod works out. that looks very adjustable, but I wonder about repeatability of settings… But then again, IMO, that repeatability fear factor thing is a bit over blown. While I know certain angle ranges are important to certain/select tools, I am of the opinion that marketers drive the fear factor up in order to create sales of “their” solutions. But then again, that is just my opinion.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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crank49

3323 posts in 1554 days


#2 posted 539 days ago

Gerry, could you not just turn the motor around to reverse the diretion of sanding belt travel?

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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HorizontalMike

6906 posts in 1497 days


#3 posted 539 days ago

Crank,
I also thought of doing that, but you need to extend all the wiring by 6-10in to accomplish it. Additionally the belt guard would have to be modified/drilled for that new orientation. IMO, at some point all the modifications will start to outweigh the benefits gained. Just buying a spare belt seems good enough for me. Others? Who knows…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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TheDane

3627 posts in 2246 days


#4 posted 539 days ago

Another possibility would be to install a metal splitter (with rounded/polished edges) in the belt guard where the belt rubs on itself.

HorizontalMike—There is a repeatability issue with the socket. So far, I have just set it by bringing the bevel on the tool up flush to the belt. The answer might be to make a set of setup jigs for common bevel angles similar to to the Raptor Setup Tools ( http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/5/-/21/95/-/5188/Raptor-Set-Up-Tool ).

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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HorizontalMike

6906 posts in 1497 days


#5 posted 539 days ago

I don’t know about you, or anyone else for that matter, but playing around with sharpening settings and “repeatability” issues, I am of the opinion that ALL OF US can pretty much eyeball each and every setting sufficiently enough to get near-perfect repeatability on resharpening and honing of our turning tools. After all, just look at several others who support the grinder solution and even THEY set their jigs pretty much by eye-balling it before setting the jig.

All of this reminds of my astronomy hobby, where mass fear is publicly generated to never never touch your telescope lens to clean it. “All of you in the public are too inept” to be able to handle cleaning your “Own” lens of dust. Send your entire telescope back to the manufacturer (the entire telescope mind you) and let THEM clean it. Do this or the boogyman will visit you…ooo..

And then you could get me going on about “antique dealers” and “professional” restoration of an ‘antique.’ If someone else owns the antique in question, then YOU could be hired as the professional restorer. HOWEVER, if YOU own the antique in question then you must “hire” some OTHER professional restorer to restore YOUR piece.

I personally believe that nearly all of us, with a bit of training and/or experience can do better than the majority of those “middleman” dealers out there, who hire their restoration work out anyway. But then again, that is just MY opinion. Others mileage may vary… ;-)

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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TheDane

3627 posts in 2246 days


#6 posted 539 days ago

One of the guys in our local turning club, a production turner who specializes in spindles and teaches turning at a local tech college, sharpens with a belt sander … no jigs, no pockets, no holders. He just eyeballs it. He’s been doing it that way for 50+ years.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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TheDane

3627 posts in 2246 days


#7 posted 539 days ago

I think I found the answer to the lack of a platform for grinding scrapers, etc.

I found an old tool platform (from Grizzly) in a box that hadn’t been unpacked after the move.

Works just fine on scrapers, parting tools, etc.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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HorizontalMike

6906 posts in 1497 days


#8 posted 539 days ago

DAGNAMIT! I’m turnin’ GREEN just as I look at it! That is the cat’s meow!

That said, I am going to have to fabricate something along those lines, but out of wood. This would be great for plane irons, if you buy the 600 grit belts.

Still messin’ with my 1/2in arbor… Not able to improve on the slight wobble yet. Either looking for a better arbor, or just going to have to live with cotton buffing wheels, and they are not really that bad. They actually work well and are adaptable to the wobble. I am sure purists (Puritans?) will hate me for saying that but they do work surprisingly well.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Grandpa

3031 posts in 1259 days


#9 posted 539 days ago

I bought that same platform from Grizzly for $14 about a year ago. Might have been a special but I felt the need so I ordered it.

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ldl

1135 posts in 949 days


#10 posted 538 days ago

Capt Eddie had a video on this rig and he attached a wooden plate to the OEM stop bracket. If memory serves me right he said come out from belt 4 1/2” and drill an indention for grinding jig. Don’t rem right off the bat which video it was right now or I would post it.

Sorry bout that. I posted this before I went back and read Horizionalmike’s review. If all goes well I am going to try to get to HF and buy this sander this weekend. I got one of the 20% coupons.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

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ldl

1135 posts in 949 days


#11 posted 538 days ago

I probably missed something in the reading but why do you want to reverse the belt direction?

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

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TheDane

3627 posts in 2246 days


#12 posted 538 days ago

If the belt is moving toward the tool, you have a great probability of tearing the belt. By reversing it, the belt moves away from the tool so belts last longer.

The link to Eddie Castelin’s video on a similar rig: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaqIGVmVHY8

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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ldl

1135 posts in 949 days


#13 posted 537 days ago

Gerry I thought that was your reason but I was thinking that with the grinder the wheel turns toward the tool. Are you thinking the flexibility of the sanding belt would cause this?

The reason I asked is I had watched the Capt Eddie’s video and he made no mention of reversing the belt. I was curious which way would werk best.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

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runswithscissors

889 posts in 608 days


#14 posted 537 days ago

I have used a similar setup to sharpen planer and jointer knives. The knives are clamped in a jig made out of 1/4” aluminum plate, which then runs in a “trough” consisting of 1” angle iron welded to a bracket that bolts on in place of the sander’s fence.

In my experience, there is no need to reverse belt direction, as long as the handle of the tool, or blade holding jig, can’t kick out at the bottom. When you lean your tool into the belt, the existing bevel prevents digging in, assuming you’ve set up your jig correctly.

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TheDane

3627 posts in 2246 days


#15 posted 537 days ago

Dewayne—Eddie is using a Delta sander … not sure what the inerds look like.

Without reversing the belt, a little too much pressure on the point of a skew and … RIP! Don’t ask me how I know.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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