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Forum topic by IanB22 posted 555 days ago 604 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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IanB22

14 posts in 557 days


555 days ago

Wow, I am really excited to find such a great forum. After the wife put the screws to me (as you may have experienced!) I decided to take a look at a lot of the old tools in the workshed from my ‘grampy’ and decided to try out a little bit of wood working.

Sadly, I am short on most power tools, but hand tools I have up the ying-yang, so after a lot of youtube watching and being subscribed to David Barron’s Furniture blog. I found myself out hunting for wood on my property. Here is what the cat dragged in, and I have no idea if it will be useful as I think I need to either

A: Build a proper DIY chainsaw mill
B: Not cut into something I don’t have the Bar to cut all the way through on the chainsaw!
C: setup, and cut something or mark something with a chalk line next time so it’s straight!

Obviously I need to do all of the above, but here is my first attempt at converting a downed tree into something useful besides firewood. Maple that is probably 150-200 years old.

Ian

Well I guess I need to learn how to post a photo….here is the direct link


9 replies so far

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 894 days


#1 posted 555 days ago

that sure is a nice pc of wood make something nice with it

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

795 posts in 707 days


#2 posted 555 days ago

Welcome to the LJs group.

Yes that is a great piece of wood.

Using my bandsaw (Grizzly 17”) I can resaw a log up to 12” in diameter. A friend will cut logs about 3 feet long, then bring them over to resaw into 2” thick slabs and dry them in his attic. So far he is happy with the results.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View whitebeast88's profile

whitebeast88

3401 posts in 787 days


#3 posted 554 days ago

welcome to lumberjocks!!!

thats a nice piece of wood.

-- Marty.Athens,AL

View MaroonGoon's profile

MaroonGoon

280 posts in 555 days


#4 posted 553 days ago

Wow, that’s a golden nugget of a find right there. I love the figure and color of the grain.

-- "Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone." -- Pablo Picasso

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IanB22

14 posts in 557 days


#5 posted 453 days ago

Here is that same piece after a few months of drying, and after some BAD checking, I find I had to cut it down to the following, still the the opposing crotch that I can use, but here is what I have after 3+ months.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

13221 posts in 934 days


#6 posted 453 days ago

If you cut that with a chainsaw, then get an Alaskan chainsaw mill. It will make it easier. I can testify that woodworking is a good alternatives to wives.

Welcome to LumberJocks

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2854 posts in 1084 days


#7 posted 453 days ago

Welcome to the asylum Ian!
I use to cut chunks out of downed trees with a little 12” limbing chainsaw until I got my big saws and a decent chainsaw mill.

The secret to using the small saw was to cut down, (stand the log up), on one side only, then when you make that complete cut come back from the other side and finish it out using the whole bar. That way it has to follow the previous cut.

Good Luck!

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Tim's profile

Tim

1171 posts in 558 days


#8 posted 453 days ago

Welcome to LJ.

This guy made his own band saw and set up to use it as a band saw mill. Not for the faint of heart, he is an engineer, but the plans are for sale.

You can resaw with hand tools too if you really want to and need the exercise. :)

I don’t know at what point a band saw mill is better than a chain saw mill. I’m also curious about how people dry slabs. If you paint the end grain or use anchor seal how much checking does that prevent?

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

792 posts in 1740 days


#9 posted 453 days ago

I’ve recently put anchorseal on some green sweetgum (I think it was a week ago) and there’s already a bit of checking in the center. I’m going to be milling the pieces on my bandsaw as quickly as possible to get them into boards for better drying.

I think I’d have a lot more checking without it though. But I didn’t want to sacrifice a piece for the experiment.

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