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watco oil

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Forum topic by Steelpapa posted 01-14-2013 04:29 AM 832 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Steelpapa

29 posts in 1797 days


01-14-2013 04:29 AM

I like using Watco oil on some of my projects. I then put a coat of Johnsons paste wax as a final coat. I’m not really happy with it. Can I lay a coat of poly over the oil ? or should I use a different wax ?

-- Ron,Texas,http://rjnwood99@clearwire.net


13 replies so far

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1909 days


#1 posted 01-14-2013 05:52 AM

Yes, you can put poly over the Watco with no problems. Just make sure the oil is fully cured. Use wax afterwards and you’ll get the results you were looking for.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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JoeinGa

3694 posts in 758 days


#2 posted 01-14-2013 12:48 PM

Poly over oil? Yes.

Poly over wax? No

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1909 days


#3 posted 01-14-2013 01:51 PM

Yes, good point, Joe. He’ll need to strip the wax.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6057 posts in 2179 days


#4 posted 01-14-2013 01:57 PM

Ron,
You can also use oil based poly or varnish mixed 50/50 with Watco as a wiping varnish. Or, you can apply a coat of Watco and then use the 50/50 mix.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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RussellAP

2966 posts in 1037 days


#5 posted 01-14-2013 03:24 PM

Let the oil cure until all the blotches come out or the top coat will make them stand out. It’s at this point that most people discover shellac. Try it, you’ll like it.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Jimbo4

1179 posts in 1514 days


#6 posted 01-14-2013 05:35 PM

I always wait al least 72 hours before applying anything over the Watco.

-- *Arachnoleptic Fit*: The frantic dance performed just after you've accidently walked through a spider web.

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TopamaxSurvivor

15088 posts in 2427 days


#7 posted 01-14-2013 06:59 PM

RussellAP, What do yo mean ? They discover shellac for undercoat blotch control or a final finish?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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whitebeast88

3602 posts in 941 days


#8 posted 01-15-2013 01:25 AM

+1 on rosebudjim

-- Marty.Athens,AL

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2966 posts in 1037 days


#9 posted 01-15-2013 01:31 AM

Topamax, for ease.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Steelpapa's profile

Steelpapa

29 posts in 1797 days


#10 posted 01-15-2013 03:17 AM

Thanks people, I love this Lumberjocks, Gene do you mean a coat of oil first then a coat with an oil/poly mix or oill / varnish mix as the second or third coat ? Russell …me and shellac seem not to get along. I think I need a tutorial .

-- Ron,Texas,http://rjnwood99@clearwire.net

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RussellAP

2966 posts in 1037 days


#11 posted 01-15-2013 03:27 AM

I like the dewaxed sanding sealer shellac. After I sand to 240g I put one coat of that on and when it dries sand it with 320g and clean. It should seal the pours, after that subsequent layers of shellac with just a touch of mineral oil for lubrication on the applicator will bring out a nice shine with several coats. You can also use wipe on poly if you prefer, but I think it’s a little thicker than the shellac and doesn’t even out as well. Most of the shellac you buy in a can is 2lb cut, but you can mix your own thicker or thinner depending on what you want to do with it. Thicker is best for large surfaces and thinner is good for shine but takes a long time because you have to have many coats, but once you see how nice it is, it will be worth it.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6057 posts in 2179 days


#12 posted 01-16-2013 01:17 PM

Ron,
Depends on your needs. If you want it really dark, use a coat (or two) of dark Walnut alone first. If not, go directly to the mix. Depending on the varnish or poly you use, it may darken a bit, anyway.
I’ve not found any difference in application or final results between poly or varnish.
I still allow 72 hrs between coats and I use Scotch Brite pads before each subsequent coat.
I always use this formula on poplar because it eliminates blotching. Of course, with most other hardwoods, blotching is of less concern. In those cases the formula just appeals to my lazy nature.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Steelpapa

29 posts in 1797 days


#13 posted 01-19-2013 04:25 PM

Well I stripped the piece,by the way its oak plywood,and its blotchy. You guys thought I meant solid wood probably. I’m sorry if I wasted ya’lls time. Back to the drawing board I guess. Its also a solid flat surface,desk, so everything is noticeable. Any advice would help

-- Ron,Texas,http://rjnwood99@clearwire.net

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