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Jointer chatter for first 4 inches then fine?

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Forum topic by 404 - Not Found posted 01-12-2013 01:43 AM 788 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1713 days


01-12-2013 01:43 AM

I wondered if anyone had experienced this before. At present I’m making a job out of steamed beech. Every board I’ve tried to put an edge on has chatter marks for the first 3-4 inches, not the close together ones, but bumpy ones, widely spaced.
The rest of the piece is perfect. I was careful to put firm pressure along the whole length.
It didn’t do it on a test piece of oak.
Changed the knives on Monday.
Any ideas?


17 replies so far

View Jorge G.'s profile

Jorge G.

1526 posts in 1219 days


#1 posted 01-12-2013 01:48 AM

I get chatter when the piece is too thin or to light. I used to try and run the piece with one of those pads that have rubber at the bottom, but I never felt comfortable doing it, so now I just cut the piece longer since I know I will be getting chatter.

-- To surrender a dream leaves life as it is — and not as it could be.

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1713 days


#2 posted 01-12-2013 02:05 AM

This only happens getting a square edge. The beech is about 23mm at the edge, so not too thin or light. It happens whether I take a full 2mm or .25mm pass.

View Jorge G.'s profile

Jorge G.

1526 posts in 1219 days


#3 posted 01-12-2013 02:08 AM

This has also happened to me when the board was too long for the in feed bed. Other than that I am stumped.

-- To surrender a dream leaves life as it is — and not as it could be.

View mbs's profile

mbs

1493 posts in 1684 days


#4 posted 01-12-2013 02:16 AM

You’ve stumped me. Can you post a video with sound of you jointing the board and showing the results?

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2836 days


#5 posted 01-12-2013 02:59 AM

I don’t know how long your pieces are but this sure sounds like the the feed pressure up front is not enough. If these are really long boards could you provide more support on the in feed side? This will sound a bit crazy but from time to time, I use a feather board, just past the cutter head. This helps for certain operations.

-- Nicky

View Bernie's profile

Bernie

414 posts in 1581 days


#6 posted 01-12-2013 01:46 PM

Lots of possibilities here and although I’m a novice at jointers let me ask a novice question. Is it possible that your lumber had a twist in the growth pattern and that you’re feeding against the grain for the 1 few inches? Disregard my comment if it sounds stupid.

-- Bernie: It never gets hot or cold in New Hampshire, just seasonal!

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1713 days


#7 posted 01-12-2013 01:51 PM

Nothing sounds stupid Bernie, I really am stumped on this one. I’ve had that machine for a long time, done lots of planing on it, never experienced this before.
All the pieces so far have been 3 or 4 ’ long. I have even tried putting near my full weight on it at the start of the cut and it still happens. I can only think the beech is hard on the knives.

View Jorge G.'s profile

Jorge G.

1526 posts in 1219 days


#8 posted 01-12-2013 02:26 PM

Are your knives sharp? Have you tried feeding the pieces at an angle?

-- To surrender a dream leaves life as it is — and not as it could be.

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 1042 days


#9 posted 01-12-2013 02:58 PM

need to keep pressure on the outfeed just past the blades

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

212 posts in 1701 days


#10 posted 01-12-2013 04:14 PM

If the feed technique is constant then the only variable is the material. Problem’s gotta be the wood itself or something about its size or weight that’s causing you to unconsciously alter your technique. Pretty obvious, I know, but sometimes the answer is hidden right there in front of you.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112806 posts in 2321 days


#11 posted 01-12-2013 04:30 PM

If you are starting the jointer just before you feed the material the chatter could signal bearing ware. After it builds speed it smooths out. I also agree that it could just be the wood.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View termiteholocaust's profile

termiteholocaust

2 posts in 704 days


#12 posted 01-13-2013 12:54 AM

it could be that the bearings on the rollers are not 100 percent parallel and are wobbling whilst the full wieght of the piece is still only on the feed table how long are the boards ?

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3203 posts in 1419 days


#13 posted 01-13-2013 03:23 AM

This might sound far fethced but check the drive belt. If it is loose it might bog down the cutter head and slip the belt. When the belt takes hold it would speed the head up and smooth the cuts again. It could be the belt or the sheaves (pulley). I would check those first then try some of the other things named. This won’t cost much since you are only looking. Keep us posted.

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1713 days


#14 posted 01-16-2013 08:55 PM

I am still none the wiser on this. I checked the belt which was a bit on the slack side, adjusted it to the right deflection as stated in the manual, but then the belt was screeching when the brake came on.
Took off the belt cover to have a look and turned it on to see if everything was ok, quite astonished by just how much the belt was flexing in and out during the first five seconds after hitting the start button.
Sorted out the squeal, belt cover back on, started it up, waited for about ten seconds to start planing in the hopes that might minimise the chatter, but alas, still the same.
Checked the tables, took out the knives, cleaned the cutterblock, put the knives back in slightly lower than they were before, results still the same.
Faces joint well, come off the machine like silk, it’s just the front four inches when edging are not quite perfect.
I’ve been able to work around it so it’s not affected the making of this job, just still scratching my head as to why this is happening.
Thanks everyone for your thoughts on this, just wanted to give an update.

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2473 posts in 2271 days


#15 posted 01-17-2013 12:22 AM

That sure is weird.

As some others have mentioned, could it be that the bearings are worn? Maybe when you face joint, the pressure is more evenly distributed across the cutter head and it does not wobble. Is there any difference to the edge jointing if you move the fence out toward the center of the cutter head? Do you feel any slack in the cutter head?

-- “While the world with closed eyes sleeps, The sky knows and weeps - steel rain. ” ― Nathan Bell

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