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Recommendations on a good Cabinet Makers Book?

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Forum topic by woodtarded posted 563 days ago 3646 views 3 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodtarded

15 posts in 570 days


563 days ago

Hello Fellow Jocks! For about the past year I have been messing around in the garage making small household items/repairs out of basic pine. I have been given Royal approval (from the Mrs.) to move a little deeper into the craft!!!!!!!! I am going slow so I dont have a huge amount of tools and such just laying around and not being used. I believe I have a very solid set of “basic” woodworking skills and would like to move forward from this point. I have an interest in furniture building/design as well as cabinet making. I would like and welcome any suggestions or advice regarding books to read or even simple projects that I could hone my skills on. Cabinets would be the most preferred starting point. Again, I welcome all advice as most of you have a vast amount of experience by comparison.

-- Jimmy---- Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the Ark, professionals built the Titanic.


17 replies so far

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vipond33

1405 posts in 1099 days


#1 posted 563 days ago

Start with a foundation of knowledge concerning your material and basic techniques. IMO there is no better book for this purpose than R. Bruce Hoadley’s “Understanding Wood”. You will be a better woodworker without lifting a tool.
There are many fine books on cabinetry, rent them from your library before you buy, if you can. One that I would recommend is “The Art of Making Furniture” by John Makepeace. It has a nice mix of ideas, plans and techniques and while the styles may not perfectly suit you, the information given is germane to any type of building.

-- gene@toronto.ontario.canada : dovetail free since '53, critiques always welcome.

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tenontim

2131 posts in 2346 days


#2 posted 563 days ago

I’m starting to get some books together that I need to weed out of my library. I have a “Technical Woodworking” book that has over 470 pages of info. It’s an older book, but the info is still good. Everything from design, joinery, using power tools, and finishing. I’m asking $15 plus $4 for shipping media mail.

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TominTexas

42 posts in 1437 days


#3 posted 563 days ago

I would recommend: The Complete Illustrated Guide to Furniture & Cabinet Construction by Andy Rae. You might find a copy in your local library.

Tom

-- East Side of Big D

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

9596 posts in 1220 days


#4 posted 563 days ago

Jimmy, what is your approach to woodworking? Hand tools (planes, chisels, rasps, handsaws, etc) or electric tools (routahs, cabinet saws, etc)? I can suggest a great foundation book for furniture joinery (The Essential Woodworker, R. Wearing, Lost Art Press) but it may not apply to the way you want to work.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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woodtarded

15 posts in 570 days


#5 posted 563 days ago

Thanks guys for the responses…..

Smitty…I really have a desire to learn hand tools first. I do have a 13” planer, miter saw and several other power tools. I will be purchasing a table saw in the next month, but aside from that I would like to keep it to a minimum at this point. I feel like getting a good foundation with hand tools is crucial to becoming a “complete” woodworker. I have spent quite a bit of time researching the tools of the trade…scrapers, planes, backsaws, chisels etc. The ironic part of my journey so far is that the more I try to learn, the less I seem to know.

-- Jimmy---- Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the Ark, professionals built the Titanic.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

9596 posts in 1220 days


#6 posted 563 days ago

Then by all means check out the Wearing book. Great foundations stuff in there…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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Loren

7257 posts in 2249 days


#7 posted 563 days ago

This one is 20 years old. Shows an approach to making
a range of cabinet styles with basic machinery, from
kitchen and bathroom cabinets to credenzas.

http://www.amazon.com/Cabinets-Built-Ins-Practical-Professional-Cabinetry/dp/0875965903/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1357922226&sr=1-1&keywords=cabinets+paul

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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NiteWalker

2709 posts in 1178 days


#8 posted 562 days ago

My favorite cabinet making book is bob lang’s the complete kitchen cabinet maker. It covers everything.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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Bernie

414 posts in 1438 days


#9 posted 562 days ago

Welcome to woodworking Jimmy. As suggested by a few (my wife would, a librarian, would be pleased with that suggestion) go to the library because there are lots of great books about woodworking. I’m self taught mostly from books. My favorite is “Illustrated Cabinetmaking” by Bill Hylton. It’s an American Woodworker series book published by Fox Chapel.

Don’t forget this forum… come back and ask questions. Be patient with yourself and it’s ok to learn you don’t a lot. Been there and done that.One of the most frustrating steps in my journey was learning the beauty and simplicity of cabinet scrapers and how to sharpen one. There are different methods and you’ll need to find which works best for you.

Again, be patient. I got into woodworking years ago when I prayed for God to teach me patients. That’s when he introduced me to woodworking…

-- Bernie: It never gets hot or cold in New Hampshire, just seasonal!

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

3785 posts in 981 days


#10 posted 561 days ago

You mentioned furniture and cabinets but in woodworking a cabinetmaker is a furniture maker. I own 4 woodworking books: (actually I have no idea where the 4th came from, the first 3 are the important ones)

my personal favorite: The Complete Woodworker’s Companion by Roger Holmes
It teaches you the basics of woodworking through a series of projects that are accompanied by some of the best illustrations and photos of any woodworking book I’ve read. This book is not well known but is excellent.

Illustrated Cabinetmaking: How to design and construct furniture that works by Bill Hylton
Basically a textbook on furnituremaking, dry but a good reference.

Understanding Wood Finishing by Bob Flexner
I’ve yet to go wrong with Flexner’s book.

Traditional Finishing Techniques, a collection of articles from Fine Woodworking
I don’t remember buying this book, maybe it was a gift, but it contains articles fleshing out the finishing process and a few things Flexner doesn’t touch on.

One tip … learn the basics of standard case construction and you won’t need to ask how do I build this or that, you’ll know. The Hylton book is good for that. Same with tables, understand the construction and you can build any kind or size of table and it will be rock solid.

If you want to build kitchen cabinets that’s another ball of wax
Build Your Own Kitchen Cabinets (Popular Woodworking) by Danny Proulx

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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Ross

110 posts in 574 days


#11 posted 561 days ago

I recommend subscribing to fine woodworking magazine. https://www.finewoodworking.com/
If there is a cabinet shop in your area don’t be afraid to pay them a visit. Talk to some of the cabinet makers while you are there. A lot of times they are eager to brag and share little tid bits of information.
Being a UPS driver for many years has enabled me to gather a lot of tips and tricks from different woodworkers and cabinet shops. ex; Crown Point Cabinets.
I have also been able to collect a fair amount of free stock from a couple of shops that I deliver to. You would be amazed at what they throw into the compactor.

-- "Man Plans and God Laughs"

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woodtarded

15 posts in 570 days


#12 posted 560 days ago

Thanks for all of the great suggestions guys!! Tom- I decided to go with the The Complete Illustrated Guide to Furniture & Cabinet Construction by Andy Rae, just because it seems to have a lot of different subject matter in it.

Smitty—I will be looking to pick up the Essential Woodworker very soon!

Rick—I actually have Undersatanding Wood Finishing already. I have read it several times! The advice on learning standard case construction is great!

Thanks again for all of the advice everyone!!! Its great to be able to have the input from everyone!

-- Jimmy---- Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the Ark, professionals built the Titanic.

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kaype

4 posts in 1101 days


#13 posted 490 days ago

Just a thought if you have a Kindel you can rent books for free in there library. It is a cool idea to puruse before you spend your money and buy a book that does not work out for you.

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MrRon

2724 posts in 1845 days


#14 posted 488 days ago

The Lee Valley catalog has a good selection of woodworking books available.

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alextabrizi

1 post in 296 days


#15 posted 296 days ago

Well, Thanks. I never thought that my comment form great home remodel suggestions ist soooo inspirating…

-- Aplus kitchen and bath, 401 E La Palma Anaheim, CA 92801, http://www.aplushomeimprovements.com

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