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G1023RL Cast Iron Surface Damage

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Forum topic by pendledad posted 591 days ago 1276 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pendledad

189 posts in 717 days


591 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw grizzly g1023rl customer service

So I started cleaning the saw. Everything was going well until I got 90% of the cosmoline off the surface and I noticed this:

There is a noticeable nick/ding/divot right on the edge of the main table surface. Large enough that when you run your finger over it you go .. “woah, that isn’t right”. I have two concerns which I told Grizzly:

1.) How flush will I be able to get my wings if this divot is right where the two pieces of cast will meet?
2.) I am worried about a board getting stuck in the divot when ripping, which could cause serious problems.

I really don’t want to go through the hastle of shipping the saw back. I’ve already got about 3 hours of clean time in 25 degree weather into this saw.

Am I being unreasonable raising this to customer service? I paid $1,200 for a saw, I don’t expect pristine showroom high end cabinet saw fit and finish … but I expect a dead flat surface with no defects.

Any experience with this? Any ideas on what they’ll want to do?


43 replies so far

View Marcus's profile

Marcus

1041 posts in 647 days


#1 posted 591 days ago

Mine had a similar ding, I didnt bother telling Grizzly about it and just knocked it down myself.

One thing that was off on my table top was the miter slot to the left of the blade was a bit too narrow and the exit and the miter slot to the right was a bit too narrow on the intake side. You may want to check that. I spoke with Grizzly, and they were willing to send a new top if needed, but same thing, a bit of sand paper and i was good to go.

View Rex B's profile

Rex B

310 posts in 878 days


#2 posted 591 days ago

It looks really tiny in the pictures… Use a file to remove the burr on the side – so you can bring the wing flush. Then use some fine sandpaper on top if there are any raised edges.

Maybe it’s hard to tell from the pictures, but it looks no bigger than the dent you will make the first time you drop a wrench on the saw. Definitely not worth shipping it back.

Edit: I figured I would add that I bought my G0715P from Grizzly’s outlet store with a bit of shipping damage to the cast iron top. A bit of sandpaper and it’s as good as new. A table saw top doesn’t have to look perfect to perform perfectly.

-- Rex

View ichbinpete's profile

ichbinpete

109 posts in 1319 days


#3 posted 591 days ago

I would first check the rest of the surface to make sure it was flat to your liking. If there are other issues, then this one is just a contributor.

That said, I have dings like that on my saw surface in various places, and suspect your old saw does as well. Probably won’t be long until you end up with a few more from hammering or using your saw as a makeshift bench. If the rest of the surface was flat and the rest of the saw was satisfactory, this small mark wouldn’t cause me a whole lot of pain and consternation. I would just file it flat on the joining edge (only if there were any ridges that would cause the wing to have a gap when joined). With the top, I would use a bit of sandpaper and pretty it up as necessary.

Then again, if it were my new saw and I knew it was there, it would probably be the first thing I looked at every single time until I made some additional scratch\gouges myself. Hopefully this doesnt ruin your new toy for you!

-- It is better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than to open it and remove all doubt.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6923 posts in 1541 days


#4 posted 591 days ago

Please remember that this is a TOOL and not a piece of ART. My bets are that YOU will do more harm to your own TS top in the first couple of months of use, than this little mark. Enjoy your new saw, it will put a smile on your face 8-).

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2709 posts in 1204 days


#5 posted 591 days ago

Like others said, flatten it out and be good to go. I wouldn’t worry about dings in the top:

Did you know cast iron routs pretty easily? ;-p

If it does bug you though, I’m sure grizzly will send you a new top. Let us know how it goes.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View pendledad's profile

pendledad

189 posts in 717 days


#6 posted 591 days ago

Yikes. Consider that a good luck horseshoe .. :-)

My intention was not to send the saw back, or deal with any replacement. Honestly, I don’t want to clean another one of those tops in the freezing cold. I’ll just wait and see what the tech support guy says is the best course of action (files, sanding, etc…).

The gears inside for tilt and height seem to have already been greased by the factory. There is nothing in the setup that talks about cleaning those and re-greasing them. There is a section on lubrication telling you what needs to be lubricated, but it appears it shipped that way. Any comments on what to do there? Do I try to clean out all the gears? I have some spray on white lithium grease that I could add a few squirts of which will further lubricate, but I don’t want to go overboard.

I still have no idea how I’m going to get this off of the skid, then off the pallet, and build the mobile base around it …

View Christophret's profile

Christophret

147 posts in 629 days


#7 posted 591 days ago

^ I agree with Mike. Gently file the burr flush and move on.

Dont use sandpaper. Get a fine mill bastard, place masking tape on both ends and gently push down in the middle as you file the burr flush.

-- I cut it twice and it's still too short!

View Christophret's profile

Christophret

147 posts in 629 days


#8 posted 591 days ago

Lithium grease will attract and cake saw dust. Parafin wax is what I would use.

Clean the gears, brake cleaner would work well if you dont want to dissassemble.
Shave some parafin wax into a small container of mineral spirits let it sit overnight.
The next day brush on the solution and let the mineral spirits evaporate, leaving the parts coated with the wax.
This is what I do when I restore my old saws and it works really well. Hope this helps

-- I cut it twice and it's still too short!

View KenShmid's profile

KenShmid

8 posts in 591 days


#9 posted 591 days ago

For a ding this small, I would recommend you use a stone rather than file. This is what a machinist would use on something like the way of a lathe. It will disappear with a few swipes in cast iron.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6923 posts in 1541 days


#10 posted 591 days ago

”...The gears inside for tilt and height seem to have already been greased by the factory. There is nothing in the setup that talks about cleaning those and re-greasing them…”

The Instructions are here (at least for my G0690):

BTW, I did NOT do this originally. It eventually got very hard to make any adjustments. I just scraped as much off as I could and then just a squirt of WD40 on the axis, NOT the gears. Then wipe off again. Remember this area is where sawdust is collected, so minimize surface lube.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4310 posts in 1676 days


#11 posted 591 days ago

+1 for Mike

MOLYKOTE® 321 DRY FILM LUBRICANT would also work well

-- Bert

View pendledad's profile

pendledad

189 posts in 717 days


#12 posted 591 days ago

I’ll get in the cabinet tonight and get to cleaning the gunky grease. There is a TON of it, and it is very chunky, so it will attract dust like magnet. I’ll clean it up and use a smaller amount of grease just enough to create a very fine film to get things moving nicely. The lubrication section of my manual is not mentioned in the “cleanup” piece of the manual. Strange. There are detailed instructions with pictures of what needs to be greased and how often.

It is going to be in the 50-60 degree range this weekend here … so I might wait and do this then. I am amazed at how cold cast iron literally sucks the heat out of your hands almost instantly. It took 2 hours for my hands to get warm after coming in from the shop last night. Unheated shops are tough in New England winters.

Thanks for the comments.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2709 posts in 1204 days


#13 posted 591 days ago

I’ve always used paste wax as my lube for the gears. Very little is needed and it doesn’t attract dust. I use it for the top too so not having to have another chemical in the shop is a plus.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 925 days


#14 posted 591 days ago

I don’t understand why your nitpicking Grizzly over a ding hell take a block sander and smooth it out and start sawing aint that what you bought it for? go buy a ROLLS ROYCE AND SEE what’s wrong with it

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 925 days


#15 posted 591 days ago

hell they was all kinds of little crap wrong with this jointer, but for the dam price I will not complain one dam bit I like grizzly I set this green monster up and it purrs like a kitten on a soft pillow HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY HAVE A NICE DAY HOPE YOU GROW TO LOVE YOUR SAW TAKE CARE OF IT AND KEEP IT COVERED WITH A TARP NEVER LEAVE IT WITHOUT A SNUGGIE TO KEEP HER WARM AT NITE

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

showing 1 through 15 of 43 replies

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