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Forum topic by lazyfiremaninTN posted 09-03-2008 12:29 AM 718 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lazyfiremaninTN

528 posts in 2677 days


09-03-2008 12:29 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question refurbishing oak

I am refinishing a large oak trunk for a friend and it is in TERRIBLE shape. I tried sanding all the old finishes off, but that took forever, so at the suggestion of Greg, I chemically striped it. It was falling apart, so I helped it along and took it apart, now I have 6 peices (4 sides and top and bottom). The sides were bowed out and I thought that I saw water marks on it where it might have been partially submerged. After striping it, I have found what looks like black mold.

Here is the question….....The wood is really “stained” from the mold. I am gonna try to sand down to fresh wood, but will the wood still release mold spores when I refinish it?

I told my friend that if worst comes to worst then we can probably spray it down with bleach and then seal it with Kilz then paint it, but I don’t want to, it really is a nice trunk, just poorly cared for. It has NO sentimental value to them, it was given to them by a stranger for a yard sale that they were having for an animal rescue.

-- Adrian ..... The 11th Commandment...."Thou Shalt Not Buy A Wobble Dado"


4 replies so far

View Al Killian's profile

Al Killian

273 posts in 2477 days


#1 posted 09-03-2008 09:06 PM

They sell a chemical for removeing the mold/black stains from wood. I will lok it up when I go out to the shop. Just have to wit for my back to charge up.

-- Owner of custom millwork shop

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Al Killian

273 posts in 2477 days


#2 posted 09-07-2008 10:00 PM

You need oxalic acid to remove those stains.

-- Owner of custom millwork shop

View robinlynn's profile

robinlynn

7 posts in 2401 days


#3 posted 09-08-2008 08:49 PM

Al is right, you need oxalic acid. And believe me, there will be nothing left alive after putting that on it. use the proper precautions. Water neutralizes it, so I usually use it outside, where I can dose it with water, also the sun helps speed the process. I always start with a dilute solution, most people advocate a 1:1 ratio of oxalic to water. And remember to add the acid to the water, not the other way around. Just common sense and remembering your high school chemistry and you’ll be fine. I used it on an 18th century cherry bench to remove black spots. Of course, it does take out all the color wherever you put it on, so be prepared to stain (or paint) it, otherwise you will have white spots instead of black. Good luck!

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lazyfiremaninTN

528 posts in 2677 days


#4 posted 09-08-2008 09:11 PM

Thanks Robin and Al. My brother Greg3g told me the same thing. As far as chemistry, I think I will be able to handle it, I am a Haz-Mat tech for the fire dept.

Thanks again gang.

-- Adrian ..... The 11th Commandment...."Thou Shalt Not Buy A Wobble Dado"

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