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Using jointer to edge plywood

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Forum topic by mcase posted 01-07-2013 05:15 AM 1411 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mcase

438 posts in 1849 days


01-07-2013 05:15 AM

Used to be you could count on that nice straight factory edge to rip from. This seems more and more to becoming a thing of the past. The poplar plywood I just got from HD is nice for painted work and far better than their current cache of birch, but the factory edges were really off. Fortunately I discovered this soon enough into my project to save the situation. I resorted to roughing out widths on the TS and then jointing and re-ripping them to finish. The results are quite nice, but it not something I ever had to resort to in the past. I may make this a practice from now on as I have diminishing faith in the quality the mill work we get nowadays. I have a four cutter jointer and as I said the results were nice, straight, square and true. Any else gone this route?


16 replies so far

View peterbb's profile

peterbb

36 posts in 1007 days


#1 posted 01-07-2013 06:03 AM

See http://woodgears.ca/jointer/plywood.html before putting too much plywood through your jointer.

-- Peter

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Loren

7809 posts in 2368 days


#2 posted 01-07-2013 06:11 AM

The main issue is it burns the knives.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Moron's profile

Moron

4704 posts in 2613 days


#3 posted 01-07-2013 06:14 AM

from HD

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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Moron

4704 posts in 2613 days


#4 posted 01-07-2013 06:19 AM

top news from dumb and dumber

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1297 days


#5 posted 01-07-2013 07:05 AM

The way I did it was to use the factory edge to give me a cut that’s a bit oversize, then put the freshly cut edge against the fence and rip to final width.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3513 posts in 1533 days


#6 posted 01-07-2013 08:22 AM

I have never used the jointer on plywood. I have always had good luck at the tablesaw. I jointed the end grain of a table leg once. Won’t do that again!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4324 posts in 1100 days


#7 posted 01-07-2013 08:50 AM

That’s one of the things ingrained in my brain from woodworking classes … never ever run sheet goods through the jointer.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6683 posts in 2699 days


#8 posted 01-07-2013 09:34 AM

Nite Walker was correct:

“The way I did it was to use the factory edge to give me a cut that’s a bit oversize, then put the freshly cut edge against the fence and rip to final width”.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View mcase's profile

mcase

438 posts in 1849 days


#9 posted 01-07-2013 12:52 PM

Nite and Lee,

Thats what I always used to do too. The problem is the factory edges are not straight, not that they are just rough (which they are by the way). What I’m getting is bows. Anyway I was taught do this too, but it works nice if you make small passes.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1770 posts in 1348 days


#10 posted 01-07-2013 02:57 PM

or make a jig like this and do it all on your TS:

http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/2005/01/28/wb/

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1878 days


#11 posted 01-07-2013 03:02 PM

@mcase – Yes, just keep doing it in multiple passes with the table saw. For example, if you need a 12” wide board, start with 13” using the factory edge, then flip to the cleaner edge and cut at 12 7/8”. Flip again, and cut at 12 3/4”...you get the idea. The curved edge (and other errors) averages out in those multiple passes. I’ve never needed more than 2 or 3 cuts on both edges at 1/16” to 1/8” a pass, even with the worst plywood. I usually leave 1/2” or 1” extra width to get to the final dimension.

This technique (and a similar one with the planer when face jointing regular lumber) leaves my 6” jointer largely without use.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3845 posts in 2088 days


#12 posted 01-07-2013 06:28 PM

If I want a “factory edge” on piece of plywood, and the piece is too large to handle comfortably on my TS, I use my router and a straight edge. The quality of cut is nearly the same as both cutters are carbide tipped!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

474 posts in 1785 days


#13 posted 01-07-2013 06:34 PM

The glue in plywood plays havocs with jointer blades. I think I will stick with NiteWalker and the rest and use my circular saw and then the TS for sheet goods.

-- Improvidus, Apto quod Victum-- Improvise, Adapt, Overcome

View mcase's profile

mcase

438 posts in 1849 days


#14 posted 01-08-2013 12:23 AM

Thanks all for the input. I got quite few options now tot consider. Thanks again.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1297 days


#15 posted 01-08-2013 03:04 AM

One other thing, you can set up rour router table as a jointer by using a straight bit and shimming out the outfeed side of the fence. If you don’t have a split fence, masking tape can accomplish this. Align the bit’s cutting edge with the outfeed side.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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