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Filling cracks

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Forum topic by Maximillian posted 01-06-2013 07:12 PM 666 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Maximillian

80 posts in 1932 days


01-06-2013 07:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question finishing joining

Hi
I have been making end-grain cheeseboards for christmas gifts, which have been a geat hit (see my last project).
Unfortunately, the one I retained for myself has developed a large crack, whhich goes right through the end-grain block. It’s surprising that it has cracked across several of the blocks. It’s as though a corner of the board has broken off (although it is retained by the edge clashings).
I want to fill this crack in and am not sure what to use, as the blosks are well-oiled with mineral oil.
Would epoxy resin (Araldite) be better than cyanoacrylate, or is there something better to ujse.
I hope that my gifts haven’t suffered similar fates.
Cheers
Max

-- Max, New Zealand


10 replies so far

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AandCstyle

1313 posts in 908 days


#1 posted 01-07-2013 12:58 AM

Max, I can’t really tell from the pix, but is it possible that you have the end grain portion of the board captured in a frame and that the end grain section has expanded across the grain enough to cause the crack? If that is the case, I would try the epoxy with sanding dust or a very black pigment mixed into it. The saw dust will make the crack less noticeable and the black will highlight the crack. This is an aesthetics issue, so do which ever you prefer. Whatever you decide to do, do some testing first. Epoxy is somewhat flexible, so it might accommodate the woods normal movement if that is the cause of the crack.

Let us know how you make out. HTH

-- Art

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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 899 days


#2 posted 01-07-2013 01:00 AM

It happens. Try something like this

http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/cutting-board-disaster/

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Dan Krager

1562 posts in 885 days


#3 posted 01-07-2013 01:34 AM

I grew curious years ago why the end grain cutting block at the butcher shop never cracked. I asked the owner of it about it and he said once a year he melts paraffin into the block and scrapes it off. He had done that since it was new. Since there is a butcher block mfr near hear, I asked if that was a good method. The response was that it was indeed a very food friendly method of preserving the block. Now these blocks were 6” thick or more. I asked the mfr how they treated the blocks they knew were headed for food use, and they declined to be specific. ??? OK. Did they treat the bottom same as top? “Oh yes, for sure”.
But from that and some experimenting on my own, a good soaking in melted paraffin will almost 100% guarantee that the end grain assembly will be stable and safe forever. It is easy to maintain too.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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Dan Krager

1562 posts in 885 days


#4 posted 01-07-2013 01:35 AM

Oh, I meant to ask. Are my eyes failing? I didn’t see any pics. ???
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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Maximillian

80 posts in 1932 days


#5 posted 01-07-2013 02:10 AM

Thanks for the help guys
Art, I wondered if my 360 degree “frame” around the end grain piece may have been the cause of the problem.
Dan, by paraffin do you mean paraffin wax that candles are made from? Does that penetrate the grain?
No, there are no photos, as I can’t figure out how to use the photo bucket thing. However, if you look at my projects or type “end grain cheeseboard” into the LJ search box you can see a photo of one I made. That isn’t the cracked one and uses only one type of wood in the end-grain section

Cheers
Max

-- Max, New Zealand

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TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2327 days


#6 posted 01-07-2013 02:35 AM

Dan, Is paraffin all that is used? No mineral oil or anything else?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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USMC6531

42 posts in 1310 days


#7 posted 01-07-2013 02:44 AM

Max, if you have a border around the cutting board that is most likely the cause of the crack, because it fails to allow for expansion of the wood, leading to stress and warping or cracking of the wood. Try removing the border and then following the above link posted by lumberjoe, the method may help fix your problem. Good luck!

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Dan Krager

1562 posts in 885 days


#8 posted 01-07-2013 02:55 AM

I use straight melted (double boiler) paraffin (candle wax, canning wax, even bees wax) on wood that has been heated to about 150 degrees in oven. Paint it on until it stops soaking in. Sometimes I just dip the piece and let it soak. Container size is an issue sometimes. Experiments on penetration show that capillary action draws the melt more than an inch into end grain, so a 2” thick end grain cutting board can be “plasticized”. I do not thin it as the stuff is oily to begin with and when melted fully is about the consistency of water. By filling the pores completely this way, the board is more likely to stay clean and is quite water resistant. Soapy dish water does remove some of the wax when washed, so suggest not using soapy water. Just wipe it clean or scrape it.
Remember that melted wax is volatile and wax vapors should be treated as a potential explosive risk, so ventilation is necessary for “big” jobs. Never put the stuff in the oven or in a pan directly on heat.
Definitely no long grain border!
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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Dan Krager

1562 posts in 885 days


#9 posted 01-07-2013 03:09 AM

Yah, Max, the photobucket thing is a bit persnickity with their new beta version. It’s still pretty straightfoward.
1. Go to photobucket page and capture the address of the pics. Either highlight and copy the URL in the bar at top or use their “direct link” copy location button. Net result is URL in copy buffer.
2. In your post click on the chain link and paste the URL or on the IMG button, select “from web” option and paste the URL.
That should do it if it’s going to work. But then everything is backward or upside down in your part of the world, yes? LOL
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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Dallas

2904 posts in 1138 days


#10 posted 01-07-2013 03:12 AM

Just for FYI, I believe mineral oil and paraffin are the same thing and pretty much inert.

I always use a mix of mineral oil and beeswax to seal a board.

Just another FYI, 2 tablespoons of beeswax will solidify a 16 ounce bottle of mineral oil to a little harder than the consistency of Johnson’s Paste Wax when warmed in a double boiler or the nuke and then cooled.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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