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Forum topic by Brett posted 01-06-2013 02:37 PM 1136 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brett

621 posts in 1320 days


01-06-2013 02:37 PM

My brother-in-law lives in New Jersey, with several acres of ash, black walnut, and cherry trees up to 80 feet tall with long, straight trunks up to 18-24” in diameter (estimated). Several of these trees were knocked over by Hurricane Sandy, and he’s trying to figure out how to remove them. He can use a chainsaw on some of the smaller branches, but most of the trees still have their root balls (10 feet in diameter) and some are lying across each other, so their trunks are as much as six or eight feet above the ground—too high to safely cut them apart with a chain saw while he’s standing on the ground.

What options does he have for removing them? I know that there are companies he could pay to remove them, but that might be cost-prohibitive and he’s concerned that heavy equipment would damage his yard (the trees are in a low area with limited access, except through the landscaped lawn around his house). Would area woodworkers or firewood companies be interested in removing the trees?

I’ll pass on any suggestions to him. Thanks for the help.

-- More tools, fewer machines.


11 replies so far

View OnlyJustME's profile

OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1014 days


#1 posted 01-06-2013 03:21 PM

The tree trunks/tops aren’t too much of a problem to deal with. It’s the root balls that will be hard to remove without any heavy equipment. Can it wait til the dry summer months?
What part of jersey is he in?
I would definitely like to remove some.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View whitebeast88's profile

whitebeast88

3505 posts in 828 days


#2 posted 01-06-2013 03:41 PM

one of my cousins had several trees blown down a few years agoin a tornado.the trunks so big 2 people couldn’t reach around them.he found a local saw mill that come in and cut them up removed them and cleaned the roots up and he got paid not alot but some for them.

with those being black walnut and cherry someone would probably take them for a saw mill.
as far as tearing up his yard with root balls that big he’s gonna have to do some major filling in anyway.
it’ll just make it easier on himself.IMHO.

-- Marty.Athens,AL

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Brett

621 posts in 1320 days


#3 posted 01-06-2013 06:52 PM

OnlyJustME, he’s in the Flemington area.

-- More tools, fewer machines.

View Whitewalls's profile

Whitewalls

54 posts in 611 days


#4 posted 01-06-2013 06:57 PM

I think the best bet would be like was said by whitebeast, find a local mill. You may even want to talk to your brother and see if you could get some of that wood milled for your own use.

-- Jared, Northern IL

View Brett's profile

Brett

621 posts in 1320 days


#5 posted 01-06-2013 07:57 PM

Whitewalls, I definitely would like to use some of the wood, but we live 1500 miles away. I saw the fallen trees in person while we were visiting relatives in the NJ area during the Christmas holidays, but my wife wouldn’t let me drag any of the lumber home behind our van (yes, we drove).

-- More tools, fewer machines.

View OnlyJustME's profile

OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1014 days


#6 posted 01-06-2013 08:39 PM

That’s a bit too far north for me.

She probably wouldn't let you do this either would she?

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3194 posts in 644 days


#7 posted 01-07-2013 12:00 AM

Check out this guys post … might be just the guy you’re lookin’ for.

http://lumberjocks.com/EricMSaperstein/blog/33763

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1100 posts in 1113 days


#8 posted 01-07-2013 03:06 AM

You are dealing with a very dangerous situation. There is a lot of pent up stress in those trees. Also, if you cut the trunk from the root ball, many times the root ball will return home to its hole. There are a lot of tragic horror stories about this situation. You need professionals to deal with this as someone inexperienced cannot safely handle this condition. Otherwise, he could leave them to rot.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1752 posts in 1201 days


#9 posted 01-07-2013 03:18 AM

it seems like it would better to do this during the winter when the ground is frozen and the machines won’t damage the ground as much

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View Brett's profile

Brett

621 posts in 1320 days


#10 posted 01-08-2013 03:54 PM

Thanks, everyone. I’ve passed this information on to my brother-in-law.

-- More tools, fewer machines.

View Whitewalls's profile

Whitewalls

54 posts in 611 days


#11 posted 01-10-2013 12:32 AM

Well that’s to bad you are that far away. Hope it all works out for your brother.

-- Jared, Northern IL

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