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Forum topic by Tbowen posted 561 days ago 1099 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tbowen

103 posts in 570 days


561 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question scroll saw scrollworking

OK, i just got my first scroll saw and love it! i have made a few projects on it like, letters and a stick man, and a wheel….
my question is…what is that paper you can put on over the work piece and draw your design on it ..and what is the name of it?(what brand is best)...

also how do you get that paper to stay, and when you are finished how do you get that papper off with out leaving a mark???

also i have the 5” L blade ….what brand of blades are the best? and what TPI (teeth per inch) is better for soft wood?

-- don't out smart your common sense


11 replies so far

View americancanuck's profile

americancanuck

130 posts in 1204 days


#1 posted 561 days ago

Check out Sheila Landrys classes here on Lumber Jocks she gives incrediably good advice. You might also try Steve goods site scroll saw workshop. I am also very new to scrolling and both of these sites helped me a lot.

View William's profile

William

8880 posts in 1437 days


#2 posted 561 days ago

There are as many ways to make, and attach patterns as there are scroll saws.

Here is my suggestion based on what I do though.
Draw your pattern, or design, on regular paper.
Cover your wood in masking tape. I use the more expensive blue tape if it is something that I am not going to finish the same day. The blue tape comes off without any problems even when left on the wood for weeks. If it is something I am completing the same day, or maybe the next day, I use cheap masking tape I buy for a dollar a roll at the dollar store.
Spray the back of your pattern you made on paper with 3M Super 77.

Apply it to your wood on top of the masking tape.
Cut your pattern.
Peel the tape off, along with the pattern that was glued on top of it.

I have read in numerous places about gluing patterns directly to wood. I tried that several times and had nothing but trouble with it. No matter what technique I tried, I always wound up with either a patter that would not stay on or a sticky, gooey mess to clean up afterwards. With the masking tape being applied to the wood first, I’ve never had an issue with patterns coming off, or removing them afterwards. The only issue I have had was when I used cheap tape and left it on the wood for a week. Even then though, it still came off. I just had to be a little more careful with it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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William

8880 posts in 1437 days


#3 posted 561 days ago

As for blades, I find that to be a matter of personal choice. While many scrollers will use many of the same blades, if you ask around enough, there are just as many scrollers that will tell you they use something completely different.
When you say, “what brand of blades are the best? and what TPI (teeth per inch) is better for soft wood?”, it depends on wood thickness, what type of cuttings you are doing (detail dictates smaller blades) and mostly, your personal preferences.
Myself, my most used blades are #2/0, #3, #5, and #7, depending on what I’m cutting. I use Flying Dutchman brand blades. Olson also makes a very reliable blade. I can’t speak for a lot of other blade manucaftorers out there, but these two are the only two blade manufactorers I, myself, have come to trust. I order my Flying Dutchman blades from Mike's Workshop. I order by the gross when I order. They are cheaper that way, and I do use them with the amount of scrolling that I do.
You can click on the link I provided to check out Mike’s website if you’re interested in Flying Dutchman blades. Be sure to check out his article titled, Which Blade Should I Use, his Question and Answer page, and if you still just have no idea where to start, he has an assortment pack that consists of a dozen each of the five most popular Flying Dutchman blades. You can buy the assortment pack for $15.95 and try those to see what you like.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Tbowen's profile

Tbowen

103 posts in 570 days


#4 posted 561 days ago

thank you all for the info!!! thank yall very much :-) this helps ALOT

-- don't out smart your common sense

View William's profile

William

8880 posts in 1437 days


#5 posted 561 days ago

I forgot to mention Steve Goode’s site. It is a vaulable source for new, and experienced scrollers alike. Go to Scroll Saw Workshop. He offeres plenty of free, downloadable patterns. Most are easy enough for beginners, but interesting enough for experienced scrollers.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Tbowen's profile

Tbowen

103 posts in 570 days


#6 posted 561 days ago

-william-.. man, THANK YOU SO MUCH!! very big help :-) i looked at your work on your site, AMAZING job.. i hope i can make some projects like you have some day…very big help thank you sooo much! :)

-- don't out smart your common sense

View Tbowen's profile

Tbowen

103 posts in 570 days


#7 posted 561 days ago

americancankuck—- also thank you vey much for the link and for the comment back!! :) it helped alot, Thank you all

-- don't out smart your common sense

View kepy's profile

kepy

151 posts in 868 days


#8 posted 561 days ago

You have received some excellent advice. The only addition I would make is that I sometimes add clear packing tape over the pattern if I am cutting a very hard wood as this helps lubricate the blade and prevent burning. You might also check our Free4all Scroll Saw Patterns. They are a great group of people.

-- Kepy

View Tbowen's profile

Tbowen

103 posts in 570 days


#9 posted 561 days ago

-kepy- ok, ill check that out.. thank you and thats a good idea to prevent burning…thank you

-- don't out smart your common sense

View William's profile

William

8880 posts in 1437 days


#10 posted 561 days ago

With a little practice Bruce, you can build anything that I can.
Just take it one cut at a time. Everything I do is pretty simple. All of it is just a bunch of little holes cut into wood and glued together. I cut it just like I advise everyone to, one cut at a time.
I knew a guy one time who cut amazingly huge clocks. The thing is though, his health and eyesight only allowed him to scroll about ten or fifteen minutes a day. So he’d work on it for ten or fifteen minutes a day. Sometimes a clock would take him over a year, but he got it done.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View woody57's profile

woody57

645 posts in 2022 days


#11 posted 557 days ago

If you get glue on the wood, Lacquer thinner will take it off.

-- Emmett, from Georgia

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