LumberJocks

Cheap table saw remedy wanted: Blade too close to the front. Jig for this?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Jigs & Fixtures forum

Forum topic by GenuineGeek posted 01-06-2013 10:20 AM 1393 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View GenuineGeek's profile

GenuineGeek

157 posts in 729 days


01-06-2013 10:20 AM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw jig tip blade question

I am a very broke woodworker who spent years neglecting his love for woodworking. Anyway, this past week I saw a 40% off sale on what was already a budget entry level table saw so I got it for $155.00 Here is a link to it http://tinyurl.com/6mzh4gt
The fence is much nicer than most budget table saws, so I made my decision and bought it. Once I started using it I found the major FLAW: As you can see on the picture of it, the blade is very close to the front edge of the unit.
I built the square cut sled and the miter sled that Steve Ramsey http://lumberjocks.com/Stevinmarin has posted here and on Youtube. The problem is that by the time the jig feeds deep enough into the miter slots on the table saw top to be stable I am already half way past the blade.
Solutions?
1. I guess one option is to get aluminium pieces that fit more snugly into the miter slots and extend them farther forward of the jig. What do you think of this?
2. Or I could build a jig that essentially extends the front of the table 8 inches or sow, and of course dado some miter ridges into it. But how would I make is fit stable and snug on the saw? Is is worth trying to build something like this?
I know that this solution would leave my fence useless, so it would have to be jig, not a permanent add on.

What are your thoughts and ideas and potential solutions?

Or if this idea already exists in a thread here, please point me to it, I could not find one that matched.

-- Don't try to figure it out... just turn it.


25 replies so far

View sprucegum's profile

sprucegum

323 posts in 745 days


#1 posted 01-06-2013 11:31 AM

I think your idea of extending the aluminum guides is the way to go. Perhaps a small table extension on the operator side of the table would help also. If you use longer guides you will not need to make the guide slots in your extension fit tight as you will have enough support from the longer guides. Are the guide slots in the saw T slots or just plain? If they are T slots you easly make your guides fit the T for more support.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5601 posts in 2123 days


#2 posted 01-06-2013 12:04 PM

If you could find a reasonably full size used saw, I’d return the new one. I suspect you’ll soon find several other major drawbacks of the current saw. http://lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/32154

Saws like these sell in my area regularly in the $100-$200 range. With a little TLC, they have a lot of upside potential.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Ross's profile

Ross

120 posts in 720 days


#3 posted 01-06-2013 12:10 PM

Turn the sled around. Both my sleds are set up so the wood is behind the miter gauge (wood facing me) Have found that I have more control when cross cutting.

-- "Man Plans and God Laughs"

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14584 posts in 1423 days


#4 posted 01-06-2013 12:45 PM

Ditto, What knotscott said!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1325 days


#5 posted 01-06-2013 01:41 PM

+1 to what knottscott said.
I normally prefer new tools, but used vs a craptastic saw like the one you bought, used wins hands down. For the entirety of owning that saw you’ll have to deal with compromises.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View Marcus's profile

Marcus

1080 posts in 767 days


#6 posted 01-06-2013 01:44 PM

Another +1 to Scott. I just sold my old delta ts350 for $150, and it was considerably more saw in every way.

View IrreverentJack's profile

IrreverentJack

724 posts in 1591 days


#7 posted 01-06-2013 03:15 PM

Listen to Scott. The more you use that saw the more flaws you will find. If you turn your sled around make sure you have an outfeed table so things don’t hit the floor while you try to miss the blade. -Jack

View GenuineGeek's profile

GenuineGeek

157 posts in 729 days


#8 posted 01-06-2013 05:23 PM

Answers to the questions:
1. It is the T slot type.
2. I cannot just turn the sled around as the miter slots are not equal distance from the blade on each side, and if I did would not my wood be getting to the blade even sooner than the traditional manner? Maybe I don’t understand that suggestion.

Yes, there are more flaws. I just found out that the blade does not run parallel to the miter slots and on this cheapo there is no way to adjust it.

I have other challenges though. I have only a compact car which makes moving a larger saw to my house mean renting a truck – no $ for that. (I am fairly new to where I live and don’t have any friends with a truck either) So I would have to factor that into my expenses. I also have a physical debility with my knees (I have been off work for a year and on a small disability pension) and I cannot setup a heavier unit alone, but I should be able to find some helpers.

Still, I think I will try to return it first.
I thought I had done my research first, clearly I hadn’t done enough. Thanks for the responses guys!

-- Don't try to figure it out... just turn it.

View sprucegum's profile

sprucegum

323 posts in 745 days


#9 posted 01-06-2013 05:53 PM

Look your saw over a little closer the moterised blade assembly must be bolted to the table somehow if it is I bet you can loosen the bolts and wiggle the whole assembly a little to true it with the slot. as for old beater Craftsman , delta and the like most of them are under powered with a belt driven arbor and will not do an effective job ripping hardwood or thicker softwood. I remeber having to let the motor cool a couple of times to rip a spruce 2 X 4 X 8’. It took two men to safley load and unload a 10” craftman, most of the fences were crap, and a good many of them had poor miter gauges. I bought a Bosh motorized unit a few years ago and thought I would keep my old delta 9” contractors saw as a spare; Wrong I never pluged it in again. I bet your cheapo will get you by nicely for a few years and for what you paid it does not have to last forever. If your miter gauge has the part on the guide that fits the T slot I bet you can figure out how to add one to your sled guides. You will have to grind or file the ends of the guides a little and find some sort of washer that fits the slot perhaps cut down a fender washer, and you will need to drill and tap the end of the guide. I could turn a t slot washer for you on my metal lathe in about 15 min but I don’t know about mailing to canada never tried it.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

View GenuineGeek's profile

GenuineGeek

157 posts in 729 days


#10 posted 01-06-2013 08:18 PM

Thanks for the advice sprucegum, but nope, I was not successful when loosening all the screws (not bolts) into the plastic housing. It is not adjustable that way.

I have it back in it’s original box and will try to return it today. If they won’t take it back or won’t give me full credit for it, then I will make due with exactly the types of suggestions you gave.

Thanks to all you guys for the help. I just joined Lumberjocks and have found that this was a great idea and there will be a good bunch of woodworking friends to help me out.

-- Don't try to figure it out... just turn it.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7822 posts in 2396 days


#11 posted 01-06-2013 08:23 PM

I’m a fan of the Jimmie Jig concept for expanding the
accuracy, safety capacity of portable table saws.

http://www.megatech.tk/jj/index.php?name=Products

That said, I concur that if you can return it and spend
the money on a common $100 used Craftsman contractor
saw, you’ll get a lot more sawing satisfaction.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View coloradotrout's profile

coloradotrout

29 posts in 751 days


#12 posted 01-06-2013 08:36 PM

Not what you are looking for—but keep an eye on the used market for tools. I see others agree. It may take some months or even a year or two, but generally you can get some really nice equipment at great prices. Make a wish list—and keep an eye on craigslist or similar. I have my wish list.. and over the years, something at about half of full price usually comes along.

I would think lightly used contractors saws in the 200-300 range would be possible. If you can afford to wait, consider it.

View sprucegum's profile

sprucegum

323 posts in 745 days


#13 posted 01-06-2013 09:15 PM

Another almost forgoten tool is the radial arm saw. With compound sliding miter saws so common now there is
very little reason to own one but you can do almost anything on the radial arm that you can do on a table saw or a compound sliding miter saw but the setup will likely take longer. I own all three and use them all. I often see decent Craftman radial arm saws in the $100 range. CAUTION some craftsman radial arm saws have a safety recall if the serial # is in the rite range they will give you a very nice upgrade kit FREE. Others no upgrade kit is available and they will give you $100 for the motor and saw. As long as you pay less than $100 for a good working saw you are not taking much of a chance. Just Google Craftsman radial arm saw recall for details.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

View GenuineGeek's profile

GenuineGeek

157 posts in 729 days


#14 posted 01-06-2013 09:47 PM

Loren,
You commented about the Jimmy Jig on my post. Their website is not terribly user friendly I was wondering:
Do I need a very accurate table saw to create one?
Do you have an estimate of the materials or the cost required to build one?

-- Don't try to figure it out... just turn it.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5601 posts in 2123 days


#15 posted 01-06-2013 09:56 PM

There just might be another LJ member in your area who can help move a saw…..anyone from Olds, Alberta Canada? These woodworkers can be a pretty helpful group. There might be someone on the Canadianwoodworker.com site near you too.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

showing 1 through 15 of 25 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase