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Forum topic by TCCcabinetmaker posted 571 days ago 558 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 959 days


571 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: tip

A couple of tips from a guy that refurbishes furniture from time to time….

1. Plywood is ok, but not for structural parts, or exposed edges. The veneers will peel at exposed edges, which is pretty tough to fix. Plywood will also bow under a load causing hinged doors with weight on them to not keep aligned properly. You can use plywood of course, just don’t expect your piece to have longevity if you use plywood where you should use solid wood.

2. Veneer is ok, but not a good solution long term wise at edges of drawers, doors, or to try and make plywood look like solid wood. Veneers peel, plain and simple, and when you try to veneer things to hide things, well it’s gonna show up over time.

3. Glues… there are alot of glues on the market, you should read up on them to see which is actually going to hold up over time, alot really aren’t as good as they are made out to be, and repairing your pieces can be trickier than one wishes when the glue joints fail.

“For repair guys”

4. Gorilla glue… really should NOT be in your arsenal, it’s messy, it ruins pieces and it’s not necessarily going to hold over time.

5. The pneumatic nail gun is an awesome invention, however you need to be aware of how much damage the different gauges of nails cause on the face, and aware of how long a nail you can use before it comes through the other side.

This post inspired by bad workmanship, and poor repair work. :/ Not that I mind the work, but hey, our reputations are our business, if we have a bad reputation, then we have no work!

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.


5 replies so far

View Willardz's profile

Willardz

56 posts in 914 days


#1 posted 571 days ago

I do on site furniture repair work for movers, and I hate when they decide to attempt a repair. I end up having to spend a lot of time removing Glue. And yes the movers love to use gorilla glue :(

-- I have Carrie, food, shelter, and wood to turn. What else do I need? http://www.willardwoodworking.com

View Bustedknuckle's profile

Bustedknuckle

4 posts in 571 days


#2 posted 571 days ago

As someone that makes their living restoring and rebuilding antique furniture I have to disagree with you to some degree on your first point.

It seems far too many woodworkers vilify plywood as a substandard and poor replacement in all circumstances for solid wood. In my experience this is just plain wrong. While plywood does have some shortcomings that must be addressed when working with it, it is vastly superior to solid wood with respect to dimensional stability, weight bearing, and ease of working.

Now that I thing about it, I’d have to debate you on your second point as well. While I’ve probably repaired more veneer than I can even fathom the failure mode is usually the same. (assuming of course it was applied properly to begin with) The biggest culprit is moisture. Once water can get behind a veneer it’s over, the veneer will be coming loose. The second is typically mechanical damage. While the first problem can be avoided by storing the piece properly, the second requires good design and consideration of how the veneer will be subject to its environment during daily use. That said, I’ve only once had to repair a veneer job that I did. The reason? The ultracat I was using was out of expiration and while it held down fine at first it delaminated a few weeks after the piece was delivered.

In short, it’s all about how the material is used and to a greater extent abused. Please don’t be one of those woodworkers that lumps all veneer and plywood into that “it’s garbage” mentality. By being willing to work within the constraints and shortcomings of the material you allow yourself greater freedom of design and are not shackled by what can be done with only solid wood.

Cheers!
Mike

-- With the right tools you can break anything!

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TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 959 days


#3 posted 570 days ago

Bustedknuckle, re-read….
I kinda said when it’s a bad thing to use on 1 and 2. Like for instance making a side of a large barister’s desk out of plywood. it will bow, and it will also not have the horizontal suppor strength of solid wood. If you veneer front edges of everything, and make drawer fronts and pieces that will move constantly out of plywood, then well it’s gonna fail, period. Now making panels out of plywood fine. but small dividers and sides of boxes… eh bad idea. I also build furniture and cabinets, so I can tell you I use a lot of plywood, however, there are times to NOT use plywood and veneer. You might be saving a little sanding time, but after a few years it will look like crap.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View Bustedknuckle's profile

Bustedknuckle

4 posts in 571 days


#4 posted 569 days ago

I did Re-read as you so put it. However I am regretting that I wasted my time writing a balanced and thoughtful reply to you. Rather than to continue entertaining your ego I’ll say what you want to hear “you’re right, there is no room for any ideas or techniques outside of those that you approve of” You sir know it all. Good day.

-- With the right tools you can break anything!

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 959 days


#5 posted 569 days ago

great a guy who comes in looking for a fight because someone mentions his two favorite things, plywood and veneer….

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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