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Any Fool-Proof Methods for Turning Socket Chisel Grips?

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Forum topic by poopiekat posted 01-05-2013 11:19 PM 945 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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poopiekat

3623 posts in 2386 days


01-05-2013 11:19 PM

I’ve got about 6 socket chisels that I don’t have handles for. It seems like each one is different! I haven’t had this problem since putting brass ball and claw feet on a stool, the taper I had to turn on the leg, I swear looked like a #2 Morse taper!! Anyway, I turned one handle and it seemed like it wanted to fit a chisel other than the one I was intending it for. a bit snug, but I cut in a kerf 1/2” up from the end, to see if the extra flexibility would make it snug, and it was.
So… my questions, for experienced handle turners are:

1. Do you measure the socket, and create the approximate taper on paper first?
2. Anyone know of a source for brass ferrules? Steel striking rings?
3. Do you use glue of any kind, or assemble them permanently dry?

Thanks, guys!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!


10 replies so far

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1649 days


#1 posted 01-06-2013 12:18 AM

Easiest way to find the shape of the taper is to take it out and look at it. Modeling clay works best. Stick it in the socket (inside some plastic wrap) and pull it out. Turn to match.

Brass ferrules hide on the plumbing aisle. They usually hide among the compression fitting nuts which they resemble in their natural state. :)

They will hold on fine dry. They wedge on like a Morse taper. You can do some final fitting by turning them in the socket and pull them out. Shave off the burnished parts. Repeat until they fit pretty close and then whack them home.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Cantputjamontoast's profile

Cantputjamontoast

341 posts in 2084 days


#2 posted 01-06-2013 01:00 AM

poopie,
go to wkfinetools and read various articles about chisel refurb.

-- "Not skilled enough to wipe jam on toast!"

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shampeon

1376 posts in 835 days


#3 posted 01-06-2013 01:31 AM

The chisel thread, I think, had this link.
http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/techniques/archive/2012/04/27/turning-wood-socket-chisel-handles.aspx

They a clever method with rolled up paper and blue tape to get the taper on the socket.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3623 posts in 2386 days


#4 posted 01-06-2013 12:44 PM

Thanks, guys!
Hmmm, those brass ferrules you spoke of David, are for compression fittings on water pipes. I need the type of brass ferrules which help prevent splitting on wooden handles. Also a source for the rings which are used to prevent mushrooming. I’m using American Red Beech and I’m not sure how well it stands up to mallet blows. Cantput: Got a link? edit: I found it!

Shampeon: Bingo! This is the type of article I’m looking for! I’ve done the modeling clay thing, but was never really happy with it. The paper and tape procedure makes a lot of sense to me. My hit and miss turning was sorta working, but not accurate.
Thanks for all the great suggestions!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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sprucegum

323 posts in 649 days


#5 posted 01-06-2013 01:02 PM

I just cut pieces of copper pipe for my striking rings if you don’t have any pieces kicking around and don’t want to buy a whole length there is no reason copper soldering (swett) couplings will not work just cut them to the lenth you want them. Most hardware stores will have sizes up to 1” in stock if you need bigger you may need to go to a plumbing supply. If you know any plumbers hit them up for some used stuff, scrap copper is worth 2-3 dollars a pound so you may have to pay a couple of dollars. I turn my handles untill the ring will not quite go on then heat the ring with a propane torch to expand it slip it on the handle and quench in cold water. They dont come off.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

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poopiekat

3623 posts in 2386 days


#6 posted 01-06-2013 01:10 PM

sprucegum: Hmmm, okay I may have misspoke, I did not know anybody was sourcing items from plumbing supplies. It was years ago, back in the 70’s, when places like Constantine’s of New York was the only place I knew of that actually sold real chisel ferrules and striking rings. I wasn’t into making my own tools then. I’ll have to try this method! Thx!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View hairy's profile

hairy

2020 posts in 2184 days


#7 posted 01-06-2013 03:52 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/27334

Plumbing nuts work for me. As for socket handles, once you get 1 to fit, use it to make a template that you can hold up to your workpiece. I bet you have one of these somwhere.

-- the last of Barret's Privateers...

View Richard Dunlap's profile

Richard Dunlap

64 posts in 1517 days


#8 posted 01-06-2013 04:27 PM

I used plaster of paris to make a mold of the socket, worked fine for me. Also leather washers on the striking end.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1649 days


#9 posted 01-06-2013 07:22 PM

When you have the fittings on the part, go ahead and turn down the brass to get rid of the hex shape and such. Brass turns just fine. Use a scraper and take it slow. I prefer the compression nuts because they already have a hole for tanged chisels or open the hole up a bit and it leaves a nice look with the wood being even with the top of the hoop. Just turn a step on the tenon to stick out and then sand it flush when you are done. You can actually just turn the part a bit oversize and let the threads cut in to hold them on better. Put them on with a wrench. If it makes you feel more secure, a little CA or epoxy will keep it on as long as you want it there.

You can also use black iron pipe (like water pipe that you use in pipe clamps) Turn the piece where they will start on and drive them onto the blank. You can turn it down to look better once it is on. Just take it slow and don’t try to remove much at a time.

I just prefer the brass. It turns easier and I like the way it looks with the wood.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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poopiekat

3623 posts in 2386 days


#10 posted 01-06-2013 08:35 PM

Thanks again, David!

Hairy: good idea, except every socket I have with a taper is slightly different from one another!

Richard: Plaster of Paris sounds like a good idea too!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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