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Lifting things onto the bench?

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Forum topic by Don W posted 566 days ago 1304 views 0 times favorited 40 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Don W

14622 posts in 1165 days


566 days ago

As I was working on my thickness sander today, I realized getting it on and off the bench was not easy task. I find as I get older, lifting and bending is not quit as easy as it used to be. I’m not old enough yet that it slows me down, but it does start me thinking.

I found myself standing it on one leg, walking it to the bench, getting one side on and lifting it up. Now, minor scratches on this doesn’t matter, but when your working on a more delicate project, you need to be more careful.

So my question is, how do you deal with this type of situation? Do you just work on it on the floor once its together or What do you do?

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com


40 replies so far

View bhog's profile

bhog

1970 posts in 1288 days


#1 posted 566 days ago

A rope and pulley from the rafters will help alot.

-- I don't drive a Prius.

View John's profile

John

341 posts in 2396 days


#2 posted 566 days ago

here’s something i’ve considered, but haven’t done yet http://www.harborfreight.com/gambrel-and-pulley-hoist-99758.html

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

14622 posts in 1165 days


#3 posted 566 days ago

I haven’t found the ropes and pulleys all that great for woodworking projects. JC, I use something similar to hang my deer, it works well for that.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 1462 days


#4 posted 566 days ago

Its probably a matter of getting your shop situated for optimum ease of
your work flow. And also acquiring some special material handling helpers.

Every shop is different and we all have our own shop issues and yours dealing with heavy material is probably a common one.

Maybe start thinking about helper carts, special material handling setups, and especially work flow.

For example, is your lumber storage situated in such a way that if facilates the initial handling and milling
without carrying it across the shop ?

For rough cut lumber I would suggest that if possible have it close by to
your machines that you will use first. Perhaps the jointer. And if possible have the sander maybe near the out feed of your jointer . Rollers and out feed tables are helpful too.

They sell heavy material handling carts at Harbor Freight that are hydraulic. The light duty one will lift 500 lbs about belt high or higher if I’m not mistaken. The heavy duty one will lift 1000 lbs.

You could build a mobile horizonal dolly or infeed table long enough to support larger longer pieces about the height of your tools. Just wheel it to the machine and set it up on the infeed. Then use it to transport the piece to the next machine.

There are a lot of material handling ideas out there from breaking down large sheet material to maneuvering large sheets and material around the shop and lifting up to and onto your saws and such.

The overhead hoists set up on some kind of x ,y track would also elimate alot of lifting provided there is room overhead .

Here are those carts I was talking about.

http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=Hydraulic+Cart

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4136 posts in 1549 days


#5 posted 566 days ago

You can build a ramp off the side of the workbench. :-)

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View crank49's profile

crank49

3337 posts in 1569 days


#6 posted 566 days ago

I have a little 1/4 ton ratchet chain hoist I got from HF.
This hoist, attached to a chain over the rafter is perfect for lifting heavies.

Got it on sale for about $40 with a coupon. Think it is on sale right now; if not it will be in a couple of months.

Much easier to work with than a cable type com-a-long.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Don W's profile

Don W

14622 posts in 1165 days


#7 posted 566 days ago

Ron, the question is What do you do?

Work flow is for speed and ease of operation, not heavy lifting.

My lumber storage is typically in my attic. Not ideal, but it is what it is and its not going to change any time soon. Carrying a piece of 2 of lumber is not the issue, and since its a hobby, I’m not usually in any time crunch. Not that I want to waste time, there are just some things that are not going to change.

I like the hydraulic cart idea, but would want to hear of somebody who has used it in their woodworking shop before I even thought about buying one.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

14622 posts in 1165 days


#8 posted 566 days ago

Brandon, I’ve used temporary ramps. I’d be tripping over a permanent one.

Michael, how high are your ceilings.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View crank49's profile

crank49

3337 posts in 1569 days


#9 posted 566 days ago

My shop is in the drive-in basement, behind the garage. I built my house with a couple extra rows of blocks so I have a minimum 8’-6” ceiling. That little hoist I referred to is only about 12” hook to hook. It’s made to carry in your tool box, but I use it all the time. I have put a pipe through a couple of holes in two joists and gained an extra 8” or so. Doing it like that I put the ratchet end on the load, at the bottom, and ratchet it up the chain.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Don W's profile

Don W

14622 posts in 1165 days


#10 posted 566 days ago

thanks, I’ll look into that.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 1462 days


#11 posted 566 days ago

Guess if you don’t you see how efficient work flow and ease of operation equates to not doing as much heavy lifting, then don’t know what to tell you.

What I do is try to make things as simple as I can. I need a 4×8 sheet , i have them cut it down before I bring it home. I haven’t built many larger projects so I only offered up some suggestions.

View Thalweg's profile

Thalweg

69 posts in 2004 days


#12 posted 566 days ago

I use a cheap Harbor Frieght shop crane (cherry picker) for really heavy stuff. Ceiling lifting wouldn’t work well in my shop. The problem with a cherry picker is the storage space.

View stefang's profile

stefang

12568 posts in 1932 days


#13 posted 566 days ago

i’m so old and decrepit that I forgot! One good trick might be having moving type blankets/pads on hand and some stretch bindings to hold the blanket in place while moving the workpiece. It also sometimes helpful to have one as a nice soft layer under the workpiece on the bench. As for the heaviness issue, a table with a drop leaf top and with wheels could be handy to help moving the pieces around above bending height.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View DaddyZ's profile

DaddyZ

2375 posts in 1638 days


#14 posted 566 days ago

Don ^ I feel for ya, Getting Old Just changes the Perspective, Old Timers call it Maturity/Seasoning/Experience…

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

View Dave's profile

Dave

11142 posts in 1438 days


#15 posted 566 days ago

Build this. Put a metal pin in a hole on your bench to where you can take it on and off. You see these things on truck beds.

Get help from the neighbors kids, bribe them with candy
Work out more.
;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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