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Jeweler's blades for marquetry work?

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Forum topic by stefang posted 01-02-2013 04:26 PM 2095 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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stefang

13623 posts in 2078 days


01-02-2013 04:26 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I know that many folks are using jewelers blades for their marquetry work. I would be interested in knowing the advantages of using these blades compared to regular scroll saw blades. I also wonder what sizes would be appropriate. Any help with this is much appreciated.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.


16 replies so far

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1722 posts in 978 days


#1 posted 01-03-2013 12:41 AM

Jewelers blades are metal cutting blades, so they have exceedingly fine teeth and the blade material is extremely tough. They are generally much smaller than even an “00” blade, so the line between pieces in marquetry are nearly invisible. The tooth configuration is different, similar to the difference between bandsaw blades for wood and metal. Scroll work is more often done in thick wood compared to the veneer thicknesses measured in thousandths, even if the veneers are stacked.
So, with that understanding, I still can’t recommend because you haven’t indicated what you intend to do with the blade. If you are scrolling, I wouldn’t use the jeweler’s blade because of heat build up due to not clearing the saw dust. The wider spacing of the teeth on wood cutting blades clears the dust better in thicker woods. If you are scrolling sheet metal, then the jewelers blade works better.
Size is selected for kerf width and minimum radius needed. In my case minimum radius is the primary criteria. Smoothness of cut depends a lot on size and tooth spacing, but also on the operator’s skill in maintaining a steady cut.
Did that wordy response answer your question?
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#2 posted 01-03-2013 12:56 AM

I wish I could help, but jeweler blades are one of the few blades I have never tried. After reading Dan’s description of them though, I want to try them now.
I do have a question. Are jeweler’s blades what people use to scroll the waste out of quarters for necklaces?

I’m sorry if I’m seen as highjacking the thread, but I figured since we were talking about jeweler’s blades…..

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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Dan Krager

1722 posts in 978 days


#3 posted 01-03-2013 01:03 AM

Yes, I’m sure that jewelers blades are what is used to piece coins.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#4 posted 01-03-2013 01:21 AM

Thanks Dan.
My next order, I need to order some and try them out I guess.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5290 posts in 1541 days


#5 posted 01-03-2013 05:40 AM

The blades I use for marquetry are technically Jewelers’ blades.
They are sized the opposite of scroll blades, ie: the higher the number the finer the blade.
The ones I use are 2/0’s and are about .01” thick. I have them in 30 tpi and 60 tpi.
They are available in standard 5” but the ones I use in the chevalet are ~7” and allow a longer, smoother stroke.
I cut packets up to 3/4” thick with serious hardwoods in them and they hold up fine but heat would be a problem in a scroll saw situation I would think. That said they are not expensive and finer cuts are finer cuts.
I have heard of people using up to 8/0 but in my humble opinion they would be extremely fragile for my kind of work and the kerfs I get with 2/0’s are invisible unless you are really out looking for them.

I like your new avatar Mike. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View stefang's profile

stefang

13623 posts in 2078 days


#6 posted 01-03-2013 09:04 AM

Thanks Dan and Paul. I appreciate the detailed answers and advice. I would be using these blades on veneers. I realize that they might not work so well in the scroll saw with stacked packets due to heat build-up, but if I use them with just two layers at a time and at low speed, it might work out ok.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#7 posted 01-04-2013 09:20 AM

Shipwright, if I am understanding you correctly, you’re talking about the ought sized blades (1/0, 2/0, 3/0, ect.). If so, then those are sized the same as scroll saw blades. When you get into hole numbers, #1, #2, #3, etc., then yes, the higher number, the larger the blade. However, going to the oughts, #1/0, #2/0, #3/0, etc. is moveing in the opposite direction, below zero, almost like a negative. So when you talk about the oughts, on scroll saw blades as well, the larger the number, the finer the blade.
I bring this up because it confused me when I first got into scrolling.
The blades I use most, from finest to coursest are, #5/0 (human hair size), #2/0, #3, #5, and #7.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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stefang

13623 posts in 2078 days


#8 posted 01-04-2013 01:10 PM

Thanks for that William. I have been confused with this issue myself. I just went out to the shop and checked. I have a #2/0 which is very fine and which I haven’t used yet. I have been mostly using a #5 as I have been doing my marquetry type work in thicker woods, about 1/4” thick.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15058 posts in 2419 days


#9 posted 01-04-2013 08:11 PM

This is too deep for me! In wire sizes, the bigger the number, the smaller the wire. When we get to the ought, the bigger the ought, the bigger the wire! ;-(( No wonder I could never figure out scroll saw blade sizes. Thanks for pointing that out William ;-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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shipwright

5290 posts in 1541 days


#10 posted 01-05-2013 12:40 AM

Exactly William.
As I had been led to understand, (and I didn’t do research) generally the whole numbers were scroll saw blades and the ought’s were jewelers’ blades.
At any rate we’re talking about the same thing, yes.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#11 posted 01-05-2013 02:19 AM

I done some checking on Mike's website, where I get my blades from.
There are ought sizes for most blade styles. From my understanding, jeweler’s blades have a different hardness, tooth design, and tooth set. However, I also looked today in my shop and compared a jeweler’s blade and a metal cutting blade on an order form I have with detailed photos. Those two blade types look identical in design, and different than all the wood cutting blades.
Then there’s a third blade tooth style now, to cut corian. Yes, I want to try that too.
There’s another reason though that I think jewelry blades would be good for marquetry. I’ve talked with numerous people that prefer jeweler’s blades over puzzle blades for cutting puzzles. They say there is less kerf to worry about. So, my thinking is that if there is less kerf than a puzzle blade, which I have used and leaves very little kerf, then they would be good for marquetry.
That’s just my thinking. I’ve been known to be wrong before though.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View rance's profile

rance

4147 posts in 1904 days


#12 posted 01-05-2013 05:44 AM

Looks like you ought to be cutting soon.

Paul, as to using your jeweler’s blades on a SS and getting burning. Don’t forget that most can turn the speeds down. I used my saw at its lowest setting one time and was amazed at how good it still cut. Cool blades and no burning at all. Just a thought.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

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stefang

13623 posts in 2078 days


#13 posted 01-05-2013 07:58 AM

Yes William, I have read that many do use jewelers blades for their thin kerf. In my case I just wanted to know the appropriate size. I really did appreciate you clearing up the sizing nos. for us. I am guessing now that with my current marquetry method I probably won’t be needing those really thin blades, but it is always good to know what is out there for future reference.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#14 posted 01-05-2013 10:54 AM

Stefang, I don’t know. I think blade choice comes down to, a lot of times, personal choice based on what you’re cutting, and what one finds acceptable.
My personal advice to anyone in this situation is to call Mike at Mike's Workshop. He can usually point you in the right direction and will send you two blades of any style and size to try for only the price of postage.
I have never done marquetry work, yet, but I find that sizes are pretty much the same across the blade styles, roughly. For scroll work, when I need parts to fit together almost perfectly, I go with a #2/0 blade. It is very tiny and leaves very little kerf.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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shipwright

5290 posts in 1541 days


#15 posted 01-05-2013 03:17 PM

With marquetry, you need really thin (2/0) blades for Boulle style or painting wood style but for classic as mike is doing they aren’t as necessary. That said it is easier to cut half of a thin line with a thin blade, for me anyway. I don’t know why. It shouldn’t make a difference.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

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