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Grizzly Jointer Plane

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Forum topic by LeChuck posted 556 days ago 1589 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LeChuck

417 posts in 1646 days


556 days ago

Hi folks,

Does anyone have experience with the #7 jointer planes that Grizzly sells, in particular their “smoother” one with the corrugated sole? It seems to get decent reviews on Amazon.

As I am working on a base for my workbench and will soon have some work holding capability and a good surface to work on, I’d like to get a jointer plane and do away with some of the limitations of my 6” jointer.

I was bidding on a nice Record on eBay but it went higher than I was ready to pay. In retrospect, I should probably have tried to get that one. Budget is limited and I cannot spend much, nor am I willing to restore a rust bucket at this point. I haven’t found anything worthwhile in the local antique shops and Craig’s List is not very prolific around here. I am not a collector and I’m just interested in something that works well.

The Grizzly is pretty cheap, I’m wondering if it can simply do the job well.

Thanks!

-- David - Tucson, AZ


18 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4693 posts in 1161 days


#1 posted 556 days ago

I didn’t know Grizzly had hand planes. After looking at them I think you might
want to look at vintage or Veritas as I think Grizzly is just the middle man. My opinion.

Fellow LJer DonW can hook you up at: http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com

Or, Veritas at: http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?cat=1&p=41182

Enjoy your journey, you’re going to dig it.

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

215 posts in 658 days


#2 posted 556 days ago

I am not sure on your budget. But it looks like you have not decided on which FIRST handplane you want to start with. I will go for a jack plane first. If the budget is below USD 100.00 then buy a used Stanley #5 and tune it up. Tuning will take time and effort…..

I hear good things on WindRiver, LN and LV but it is well above 100.00. At any case start with wood stock
that are straight and not figured. The less knots the better.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

6525 posts in 1267 days


#3 posted 556 days ago

IF you mean Groz, instead of Grizzley….... Stay away from anything with GROZ on it. E Bay has a LOT of #5 Jack planes going for less than $30, counting shipping.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1226 posts in 767 days


#4 posted 556 days ago

With all the good used #7s out there, I wouldn’t buy one of those planes. They’re $55, and for about the same price you can get this one, for example.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7154 posts in 2232 days


#5 posted 556 days ago

I’m sure the Grizzley will get the job done.

Bench plane function is mostly about the basic geometry of
the tool and holding the iron in a fixed position. That’s
why simple home-made wooden planes can produce
the same fine results as expensive iron planes.

In #4 sized planes meant for final smoothing of woods
there are a few other factors to consider when working
the finer hard woods, like mass of the plane body
and pitch angle of the blade.

Nice planes are nice to have, but any jointer with
an adequately flat sole will get the work of a
jointer plane done.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View LeChuck's profile

LeChuck

417 posts in 1646 days


#6 posted 556 days ago

Thanks for the replies. I was mostly hoping for feedback from users of the Grizzly planes, but I’m of the opinion that most tools should just be able to get the job done, unless they have some definite big flaws.

I probably did not give enough information, but to recenter the subject: I am not looking for my first plane. I have a #4 that is made by Anant, their “AA” premium line (the blue ones) and it has a nice 1/8 thick blade and works really well in my opinion. If they made a #7 like that, I’d try to get one of those. I also have a Craftsman 3732 low angle block plane, which is really a Stanley #65. I do need a jointer plane. My jointer is too narrow and too short, and I need to be able to do some hand flattening. I cannot afford anything remotely close to a Veritas, LN, or even WoodRiver. And I’m definitely not talking about Groz :) I did have a few Groz planes in the past. I still have one of their block planes too.

-- David - Tucson, AZ

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

6525 posts in 1267 days


#7 posted 556 days ago

I have a Bailey #8 (@$25) I rehabbed last year, i have a bob-tailed KK7 that was also a rehab. I have TWO #6 small jointers , and a Union #5A that is a little smaller yet, All are about the same width in the cutter, from 2-5/8” for the #8, down to 2-1/4” for the one #6. The most they cost was that #8.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View LeChuck's profile

LeChuck

417 posts in 1646 days


#8 posted 547 days ago

Well, I ended up buying an older Record #7 on ebay for a decent price. Haven’t had time to test but the plane seems nice and is in pretty decent condish, except the blade, which is badly nicked in several spots. At this point, and with a tight budget and without owning a grinder, I’m wondering if it’s worth it to just spring for a new blade from Veritas (and perhaps a new chip breaker) or taking this thin-ish old blade to some sand paper to try to grind out the nicks and resharpen…I do have an 8” disc sander and a 1” belt…

-- David - Tucson, AZ

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1226 posts in 767 days


#9 posted 547 days ago

The old blade will be fine. Even new blades need to be honed, and it’ll be good experience to regrind the bevel on the old one. And there’s nothing wrong with a thin blade. It’s easier to sharpen and hone, and properly set up will perform just as well.

If you use a powered sander, make sure you use a light touch and don’t cook the blade. Keep a cup of water handy and dunk it when it gets hot.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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JayT

2041 posts in 795 days


#10 posted 547 days ago

The disc sander should work to regrind the bevel and then you can sharpen and hone using a scary sharp method (if you don’t have sharpening stones). As shampeon mentioned, use water to keep from overheating the blade with the disc sander and you will be fine.

The “thin-ish old blade” will work great, no need to replace it.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View LeChuck's profile

LeChuck

417 posts in 1646 days


#11 posted 547 days ago

Thanks. Time is a bit tight right now, but because I could not order and receive a new blade before the weekend, I’ll just have to refurb the old blade so I can actually start using it, then we’ll see how it works I guess. My #4 plane has a 1/8 blade that seems to stay pretty sharp forever. I am building a workbench base and had to flatten one edge on 20 boards with the #4 as I took my power jointer back to Harbor Freight for a refund. The knots are terrible though.

I have a 1000/4000 stone and a good guide so I should be good after the regrind.

-- David - Tucson, AZ

View LeChuck's profile

LeChuck

417 posts in 1646 days


#12 posted 547 days ago

If this info makes any difference, the stock blade on this Record plane is tungsten vanadium…

-- David - Tucson, AZ

View LeChuck's profile

LeChuck

417 posts in 1646 days


#13 posted 547 days ago

Correction, “tungsten steel”.

-- David - Tucson, AZ

View anneb3's profile

anneb3

35 posts in 137 days


#14 posted 121 days ago

Set up and sharpening is the name of the game with planes. If you live in Tucson, go down to Kent’s on W. Grant and see what he has to offer. Don’t just look on the shelf, ask one of the workers. They know their stuff.
Just bought a diamond honing sharpening stone for 18.00 there.

View anneb3's profile

anneb3

35 posts in 137 days


#15 posted 121 days ago

http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/article/how-to-use-a-honing-guide.aspx

Fine Woodworking has a decent burb about sharpening

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