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Forum topic by 12strings posted 570 days ago 664 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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12strings

372 posts in 982 days


570 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: wax

What are situations where you find that one wax works better than another for shop use?

For example:

-Some use beeswax on handplane soles…does this work well for both wooden and metal planes? ...Is parafin wax or finishing wax necessarily better or worse?

-My Veritas dovetail saw came with instuctions to use parafin wax for lubrication, but warned against using beeswax, as it would gum it up.

-Which wax would be best for wooden drawer slides?

-What other uses do you find for wax, and which wax works the best for those uses?

THANKS IN ADVANCE!

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!


5 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1643 posts in 1091 days


#1 posted 570 days ago

I use paraffin on my plane soles, but they are all metal planes. I do a keep margarine tub of beeswax (a toilet ring bought just for this) to lube my wood screws.

-- I long for the days when Coke was a cola, and a joint was a bad place to be (Merle Haggard)

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11638 posts in 2286 days


#2 posted 570 days ago

I’ve used paraffin wax on drawer slides numerous times.
Seems to me that Beeswax would be too soft and not stand up to the pressures involved with drawers sliding in and out. I think of Beeswax as a type of finish or to be mixed with other products : ) JMHO.
I use paste wax on my metal surfaces for rust protection and to make the wood glide easier over them.
And I use bikini wax for…oh , nevermind…LOL Happy New Year : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View BTimmons's profile

BTimmons

2076 posts in 1083 days


#3 posted 570 days ago

I used some Minwax paste wax on the underside of my table saw sled. After trying it raw, it was like night and day. Very smooth and easy to use.

I haven’t heard any glowing recommendation about much of anything Minwax does, and this was the cheapest wax I found on the shelf when I bought it. But hey, I’m poor. Any idea on whether this would be passable for using on the soles of metal planes, or should I get better stuff?

-- Brian Timmons, Big T Woodworks - https://www.etsy.com/shop/BigTWW - http://vimeo.com/98821147

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Dusty56

11638 posts in 2286 days


#4 posted 570 days ago

The wax serves as a lubricant and wears off , Brian , so I personally wouldn’t spend a lot of money on anything “better” for that purpose. JMHO : )
I use Butchers Wax on my jointers and tablesaw and bandsaw and planer beds , so I don’t consider the plane sole to be any different.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View derosa's profile

derosa

1532 posts in 1433 days


#5 posted 570 days ago

I keep an old can of turtle wax in the shop for metal planes and cast iron work surfaces, otherwise I have a chunk of bee’s wax for wooden objects. For things that are screw based like the screws on the planer that raise and lower or inside the tablesaw I have a bottle of white lightening chain wax from the bike shop. Goes on easy and is designed to get in the tight spaces of a chain so it works well on threads, dries in a few minutes.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

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