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Raised panel bit problems

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Forum topic by Matt Przybylski posted 571 days ago 1125 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Matt Przybylski

433 posts in 975 days


571 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: raised panels freud routing

So I tried my hand today on some scraps of QS red oak at making a raised panel (I was testing on end grain if that matters). Anyway, I had two different Freud raised panel bits. Both burned the end grain and left a rough feeling on it. I didn’t try the long grain because of the unsatisfactory results I got on the end grain. Here is my setup: PC 7518 running at 10,000 RPM, feed rate relatively slow but constant. Tried to up the feed rate a bit but it didn’t make much difference. The other thing of note is that I got the bits second hand on CL but they seemed to be barely used. I also cleaned them with Rocklers bit and blade cleaner before use. The question then becomes what exactly am I doing wrong? Is there some secret that I don’t know to getting good results with these bits?

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com


9 replies so far

View Wdwerker's profile

Wdwerker

331 posts in 830 days


#1 posted 571 days ago

If you slow down the bit and take small cuts 1/8 or less and keep the feed rate up( avoid going too slow) and still get burns then the bit is dull!

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

894 posts in 622 days


#2 posted 570 days ago

Just wondering: a panel raiser is a pretty big diameter, which means the outer perimeter is going a lot faster than the inner part of the cutter. Maybe someone else can advise whether this could be a factor. One clue would be which part of the cut is burning. If the burn is all across the cut, then a dull bit seems likely.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1756 days


#3 posted 570 days ago

10000 rpm is the slowest speed. That’s good.

Take gradual cuts. The last of which should be only enough height to clean up the burn marks…and push it through quickly.

Panel raising bits can’t take big cuts anyway. It may take 10 passes to get the results you want. Taking too much in a pass can cause a violent kick with these bits, and tear out can be bad if you are too aggressive.

To help with burning earlier in the process, give the bit some time to cool off between passes.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

433 posts in 975 days


#4 posted 569 days ago

Thanks for the input everyone. I’ll have to retry it on some more test pieces but for the time being I went with a straight bit to make a “shoulder” and then a cove bit for the round up portion. It worked out quite well and I like the look.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View Greg's profile

Greg

281 posts in 1471 days


#5 posted 569 days ago

I like what Cosmic sniper says. Let me add this: Looking sharp, and being sharp are 2 separate things. You may wanna find a GOOD sharpener and have them sharpened so you know that is not a factor.

Before that though, you can try a dry lubricant like the one made by Bostik -”Dri-Cote Blade & Bit Cutting Lubricant.” This stuff is pretty awesome.

I want to reiterate Cosmicsniper’s most important part-”Take gradual cuts. The last of which should be only enough height to clean up the burn marks…and push it through quickly.” You should be pushing that last one through quicker than the others. It will take some getting used to, but if all of this fails, I say the bits are too dull for oak, which is a very hard wood.

-- You don't have a custom made heirloom fly fishing Net? http://www.Sierra-Nets.com

View BurtC's profile

BurtC

89 posts in 1727 days


#6 posted 569 days ago

Dunno.. I used the Freud raised bit set on hickory with no problems. Think maybe your bits are dull.
Sharpening info: http://www.freudtools.com/t-sharpen.aspx

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

433 posts in 975 days


#7 posted 569 days ago

BurtC, thanks. There is a sharpening center about 15 minutes away.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

433 posts in 975 days


#8 posted 568 days ago

Just a quick update. I went ahead and used the method I outlined previously with the straight/cove bit setup. I got them done and took some pics after sanding today. I’m pretty pleased with the results for my first time doing raised panel doors (or anything thats not really a small or shop project for that matter) and not having good raised panel bits.

P.S. Did I ever mention I absolutely HATE sanding? UGGH, and this is using a Festool ETS 150/3 too. My hands vibrate for like 5 minutes after I’m done.

P.S.S. Don’t mind the sapwood (or the grain for that matter…) in the middle of some of the doors. I made poor decisions when planning the wood to be used on the panels and I’ve not turned it into a “feature” :) Live and learn.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2163 posts in 2144 days


#9 posted 568 days ago

Also, using a dado blade one can hog out a large portion of material around the panel before going to the sharper or router.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

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