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Jet 1220 vs 1220VS

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Forum topic by naterajj posted 12-28-2012 07:51 PM 1395 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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naterajj

22 posts in 1828 days


12-28-2012 07:51 PM

Hi,

I want to get started in wood turning, mostly for furniture purposes (turning between centers / spindle turning). The Jet 1220 series seems to be a popular choice to start, seeing as it can have a bed extension, dedicated base, etc.

Most people seem to like the VS, but the regular 1220 also supports different speeds via belt adjustments, so, can someone explain the difference? most precisely, What can you safely do with the VS that you cannot do with the other? After all there is a $150 difference between them.

Thanks!

JJ


11 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1168 posts in 853 days


#1 posted 12-28-2012 08:23 PM

I like both lathes looking at specs want VS model.
If have the money buy the VS model with lower 200 rpm thru 4,300 rpm. Still have to do some belt changing. If do not have extra money non-VS model will work just fine.

http://content.jettools.com/assets/manuals/708376VS_man_EN.pdf

When finish turning always advisable to turn lathe back to slowest speed, VS model makes doing that a snap.
Many other benefits to VS lathe, until you own one won’t fully understand.

-- Bill

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6960 posts in 1632 days


#2 posted 12-29-2012 01:33 AM

I just ordered the Delta 46-460 yesterday, after an exhaustive search and feedback session on another thread that I had created, here.

One of the determining factors I found, was related to this article from Fine WoodWorking:
http://www.deltamachinery.com/downloads/publications/2012_Tool_Guide_Fine_Woodworking.pdf
In it you will see the Jet 1220 reviewed. Maybe this will help you decide.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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naterajj

22 posts in 1828 days


#3 posted 12-29-2012 02:20 AM

Wildwood, yeah I figured the VS is nicer, I am planning to take a class or watch some videos to learn about safety in the lathe

Wow Mike, that’s one useful like right there, the Turncrafter Commander looks real solid to me, it’s long enough from the get go to even turn table legs, and even leave me some money to get accessories. thanks!

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Wildwood

1168 posts in 853 days


#4 posted 12-29-2012 01:01 PM

2012 FW magazine article comparing apples to oranges and incomplete. Not all the models tested EVS turn dial to change speeds some models were plain old Variable Speed move belt to change speeds. Article does say need to rotate dials and make belt changes some models have no dial.

See Jet Tool manual for speed range on both their non-EVS & EVS models what said in article.

Why did Rikon, Grizzly, and NOVA Comet mini lathes not make the article? I cannot tell you where to buy those two General International mini lathes in USA mentioned in article. Have not read anything about those GI lathes on any message board.

Article is what it is and if you find it useful okay. Obviously, think they could have done a better job.

Types of variable speed lathes sold today:
Reeves drive, move a lever to increase or decrease speed while lathe in operation. Have not seen this set up on a mini lathe.

Open access door and move belt over pulley wheels to increase decrease speed.

EVS, still need to move belts over pulleys, but dial adjust speed up or down. In addition to lathe motor have inverter/controller package thus additional cost.

DVR, while not a considered a mini lathe 16” x 24” do not need to move belts, just tap a key pad to adjust speeds.

-- Bill

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HorizontalMike

6960 posts in 1632 days


#5 posted 12-29-2012 01:54 PM

Bill,
FWW explained that their minimum was 3/4hp for the review process. So, the Rikon and other 1/2hp machines were excluded. I thought that at first as well since I was originally considering purchasing the Rikon 70-100. I think that FWW boxed themselves into a corner when setting the HP criteria, so your arguments concerning the various methods for varying rotation speed can be grounds for altering one’s purchasing decision, though for me it was the 1-hp that mattered the most and guided me to the Delta 46-460.

To be fair, FWW probably should have titled this portion of the article ”Midi-Lathes” in lieu of “Heavy Duty Benchtop Lathes”, though they do bring that distinction up in the first paragraph.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Wildwood

1168 posts in 853 days


#6 posted 12-29-2012 09:13 PM

Mike, know Rikon comes with only ½ HP motor still popular with turners and received many favorable reviews from media. Whether mini lathe has ½ HP, ¾ HP or 1 HP motor all will turn furniture legs & knobs plus many other small turnings.

Yes they say wanted ¾ HP and above and variable speed lathes for their test. Under their stated requirements, a Nova 16-22-44 and Nova DVR qualify too.

My only heartburn with the article is not defining variable speed, hence my stab at simple definition. They say all tested models speed controlled by a knob and moving belt along pulleys to adjust speeds. Lowest & highest RPMS cited in article for moving belt along pulleys. Some models were EVS but not everyone tested.

Nova Comet II real Swiss Army Knife of wood lathes was on sale prior to Christmas. Not sure if Grizzly model comes with a bed extension.
http://www.amazon.com/NOVA-46000LO-Limited-Edition-Launch/dp/B007JSSJAE
http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-x-20-Heavy-Duty-Bench-Top-Wood-Lathe/G0658

Making Delta their top choice a no-brainer one of the most popular mini lathes around today. Turncrafter reliability kind of hit or miss so how it became people’s choice has me wondering.

-- Bill

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6960 posts in 1632 days


#7 posted 12-29-2012 11:08 PM

Understand your point. I do not subscribe to FWW for similar reasons. I usually like things more discrete in explanation and in depth of content. I have several other sources I do trust more than FWW, though I do feel the review was relevant to the OP. Read my other link/thread on my search to see where I went on this journey for the perfect beginner’s lathe.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1168 posts in 853 days


#8 posted 12-30-2012 05:14 PM

Mike, I am on my fourth wood lathe, no such thing as a perfect lathe. For awhile could not get lathe stands and bed extensions for your Delta lathe. Customer service can be a mixed bag. Good example of what talking about, some lathe brand vendors even worse. I say vendors because do not know of a mini lathe made in North America.

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/2727

Asian made lathes all about how many fit into a container. Spare parts may or may not be available without a wait. Some vendors do not even stock parts for their lathes.

Even with Murphy’s Law mini lathes great for folks just getting started or downsizing.

-- Bill

View naterajj's profile

naterajj

22 posts in 1828 days


#9 posted 12-31-2012 11:54 PM

Mike, Bill, thank you for your informative discussion. After reading a bit about the PSI lathes. I concluded I should pass…

Good news is, that my local hardware store had a used delta 46-700 on consignment that I picked after checking a few things (noise, vibration, alignment). Much better starting option, specially at the price of $260.

Thanks again and happy new year.

JJ

View ScrubPlane's profile

ScrubPlane

187 posts in 914 days


#10 posted 01-01-2013 12:10 AM

I wrestled with this same question last summer as I was also getting back into wood turning.

My final solution was the NOVA DVR…an excellent machine and you can purchase a ‘factory reconditioned’ machine directly from NOVA at a nice discount.

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Wildwood

1168 posts in 853 days


#11 posted 01-01-2013 11:05 PM

JJ, have a Delta 46-700 12” x 36” lathe sitting on floor in back of my shop. My second lathe and if was smart would have returned it and got money back. Reeves drive and bearing went out in less than thirty days; two warranty repair shops gave it back to me without fixing anything. None of those shops around anymore.

Eventually took it to welding/machine shop here in town, removed the reeves drive, installed a pulley wheel on spindle, bought new pulley wheel for motor, they made me a bracket for motor to swing back and forth so could change speeds. After spending another $150 lathe lasted several years before got my Jet 1642.

Hope you have good luck with your new lathe.

-- Bill

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