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Planes, what do I do now??

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Forum topic by ZED posted 574 days ago 661 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ZED

83 posts in 957 days


574 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question plane

So I bought some hand planes and am in the process of refurbishing them. I have a Stanley #6 and #7 !

https://s3.amazonaws.com/lumberjocks.com/mfpv9vh.jpg!

So I sandblastted them and got them cleaned up but now I need to paint them or oil/wax them any ideas? What type/brand of oil or wax. What blade to order etc. I need some suggestions and am totally open to be told what to do.

-- A good craftsman is able to make it work with the tools he has, I still need more tools


12 replies so far

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14633 posts in 1166 days


#1 posted 574 days ago

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Dallas

2855 posts in 1085 days


#2 posted 574 days ago

What is wrong with the blades in them now?

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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hhhopks

559 posts in 975 days


#3 posted 574 days ago

Next time, reconsider the sand blasting part.
Take Don’s suggestion on the link.
Don is the local LJ pro.

My theory is that these planes (the good planes) work before so why change?
We need to learn how to use them and to take care of them first.
The tool will then perform as intended.

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

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ZED

83 posts in 957 days


#4 posted 574 days ago

yeah so Don sand blastted his and I wantted to know what ype of wax to use as in what brand, he does not have that on his blog. I do like the electrolysis idea. And What the heck is japanning?

-- A good craftsman is able to make it work with the tools he has, I still need more tools

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ZED

83 posts in 957 days


#5 posted 574 days ago

Thank you for the help guys. Tri-H I was reading about the new steel being put out by Lee-Valey and thought I would try it. but your right the whole reason I got these was because they work and I want to learn how to care for them and keep them working.

-- A good craftsman is able to make it work with the tools he has, I still need more tools

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14633 posts in 1166 days


#6 posted 574 days ago

I use a mix of my own. Almost any kind of paste wax will work.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9587 posts in 1216 days


#7 posted 574 days ago

Wax applied to the sole, during use? Anything will do. I melted down a candle, for example.

Japanning is essentially an asphalt paint used on planes and other tools.

The irons that came with your planes, unless totally used up, will do fine. Save that money for sharpening supplies, as that’s the gateway to hand tool use.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14633 posts in 1166 days


#8 posted 574 days ago

You can pick up some bees wax and mix it with turpentine. I’ve done the same with some old candles and that works.

For a container I pick up small jar candles from the dollar store. The jars are great.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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hhhopks

559 posts in 975 days


#9 posted 574 days ago

I use the electr method to remove rust.
I use the standard polishing wax for furniture/wood finish for a smooth glide & to protect the metal.
The japaning is the old paint job which we don’t use anymore (I think). They put that type of paint on and bake it.
A lot of people use engine spray paint from auto store. You can use enamal too. I think it takes longer to harden and may not be as good ???

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

View PaulsenbyHand's profile

PaulsenbyHand

12 posts in 587 days


#10 posted 574 days ago

Personally I wouldn’t change the blade. The stock blade works like a charm. And i would dread to paint such a beautiful old tool.
What I would do though, is to flatten the frog, so the contact area between blade and frog is tight and rattle free.

Depending on how thorough you are, the best result, in my opinion, comes if you remove the yoke and lateral adjuster. The yoke has a tiny pin you can knock out with a pin or a nail (dont knock it all the way, just enough to remove the yoke), and the lateral adjuster pin has to be filed flat on the back side of the frog, so you can tap out the pin. This would deter many, but I have done it on all my planes, and the pin is still sitting in there tightly enough. This gives you the oppourtunity to flatten the entire frog. Then I would flatten the sole of the plane (while the iron is in, but retracted) and finish the entire plane with a light coat of machine oil or such.

If the blade is sharp that tool will work like a dream!!!

Just my couple of cents

-- David, Copenhagen, Denmark

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ksSlim

955 posts in 1488 days


#11 posted 574 days ago

Not bad for a first attempt
A little love on the original blades and they’ll work just fine.
Don W has a gret blog and links for reference.
Welcome to the club.

Restoring tools can be addictive.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

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JayT

2087 posts in 809 days


#12 posted 574 days ago

A modern twist on japanning is possible. If you want more information on japanning, make sure to check out the comments in the blog, there are some good links found by other LJers. For starting out I would definitely recommend the Ford engine enamel that Don uses.

Good old Johnson’s paste wax works well for protecting the metal.

Welcome to the dark side of planes and restoring. There is no return.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

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