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Forum topic by emart posted 12-24-2012 11:05 PM 1244 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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emart

271 posts in 1350 days


12-24-2012 11:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

when I was planing the material for my toys I noticed the boards have large black rubber marks on them and the boards are not feeding properly. Does anybody know how to resolve this? I have only had this planer for about a year and already the knives are needing to be rotated most likely because the wood i used has a lot of knots and sap in it. the planer is a dewalt 734. personally i dont care that much about the marks they can be sanded out but i want to know why this is happening so i can keep my planer in decent shape. the marks a heavy black rubber skidmarks and they run the entire width of the board and often happen when the board gets stuck in the planer

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/


15 replies so far

View lab7654's profile

lab7654

252 posts in 969 days


#1 posted 12-24-2012 11:11 PM

The marks are most likely due to the rollers rubbing on the board and not feeding it properly. Check the rollers for wear, maybe they are just worn down too much and can’t grip the stock. Otherwise it may be the wood. The sap might be sticking to the bed and not letting it go through smoothly. Try waxing the beds and scraping off any sap you can before planing.

-- Tristin King -- When in doubt, sand it.

View patron's profile

patron

13145 posts in 2063 days


#2 posted 12-24-2012 11:16 PM

i’m guessing the sap is on the table
and is keeping the boards from sliding through
and the rubber rollers are spining on the boards
and leaving their mark

raise the cutter head
and wipe the table with a solvent
(maybe mineral spirits or lacquer thinner
if not plastic close there)

then wax good

this should help

watch the blades as you clean under them

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

1162 posts in 747 days


#3 posted 12-25-2012 12:11 AM

I find Dry Lube (there are different brands) works well on planer and jointer beds. Don’t get it on your feed rolls. If pitch or sap in the wood is gunking up the table, you might need to clean it off pretty often. By the way, if you get pitch on your hands, vegetable oil from the kitchen is a great way to get it off. Don’t think cholesterol is absorbed by the skin.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1687 posts in 957 days


#4 posted 12-25-2012 04:17 AM

I’ve noticed that when my planer did that, the rubber on the rolls was twisted and torn into two halves at the ends. No amount of (probably needed) cleaning will make that go away, only new rollers.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3514 posts in 1536 days


#5 posted 12-25-2012 04:35 AM

Replace the blades. When the blades are dull, it takes more force from the rollers to push the workpiece past the blades. As it gets worse, the rollers will slip and leave black marks on the board.
In addition to replacing the blades, wax the table. It will prolong the life of the rollers.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11678 posts in 2410 days


#6 posted 12-25-2012 06:41 AM

Ditto on the blade replacement and then clean your rollers and bed and then wax the bed often : )
I have the DW733 and had similar issues years ago. Sharp blades did it for me !

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View burlman's profile

burlman

4 posts in 701 days


#7 posted 12-25-2012 02:30 PM

I agree with blade replacement (sharpening), clean rubber rollers or replace if needed, clean and wax the bed.
Then spend some time adjusting the machine! I find spending toime cleaning and adjusting the machine is fun and affords me the time to really get to know the equipment inside and out (so to speak!).
burlman

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11678 posts in 2410 days


#8 posted 12-25-2012 05:53 PM

burlman , you are correct about the machine adjustments. I just went through my DW733 and I was finally able to get the head adjusted so it cuts evenly across the entire width of the machine…..I had been “living” with it for about 10 years the way it was . LOL
My fear was that I would / could make it worse instead of better.
I had put the blame on myself for not being able to set the knives evenly , when in reality , it was the head that was slightly uneven.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View emart's profile

emart

271 posts in 1350 days


#9 posted 01-21-2013 03:17 AM

well since i have a new commission in the works i took the time to open my planer and do some work. i was amazed at how easy this was considering how some brands are a royal pain to get at the blades. just one access panel had to be removed to get at the blades(which were chipped and gummed up.) so one hour a lot of cleaning and some nicks on my hands to show for it my planer is running like new again. I rotated the knives, cleaned the cutting head, and wiped everything down with mineral oil to try and get as much pitch off the machine as possible

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51450 posts in 2203 days


#10 posted 01-21-2013 03:29 AM

Sounds like you have made some progress. Dont forget to wax the bed like many have said. I wax mine fairly often. It helps the wood slide through much easier and its easier to clean the bed if you need to. This is a good trick even on your table saw and jointer. You will find the wood moves much easier when the tables are waxed.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

1162 posts in 747 days


#11 posted 01-21-2013 04:28 AM

That brings up one advantage of a heavy duty machine: the segmente/serrated drive roller(s). You can still run into problems with work not feeding, and will need to clean and lubricate the bed, but at least your rollers don’t self-destruct.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View rockindavan's profile

rockindavan

284 posts in 1358 days


#12 posted 01-21-2013 07:44 AM

I have noticed that my planer doesn’t feed as well when it gets cold. The rubber loses some of its gripping strength when it gets below 40 in the shop

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runswithscissors

1162 posts in 747 days


#13 posted 01-21-2013 08:41 AM

I haven’t tried this, but it might be worth looking into: in the old days (Remember typewriters? Remember typewriter platens? Ever notice how the platen resembles the drive roller in a benchtop planer?), office supply shops had a product you could spray or wipe on the platen to freshen up the surface. I wonder if that stuff is still around?

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11678 posts in 2410 days


#14 posted 01-21-2013 03:24 PM

What’s a typewriter ? LOL : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View emart's profile

emart

271 posts in 1350 days


#15 posted 01-21-2013 10:09 PM

yeah im sure this weather isnt helping. My shop has no heat so anything plastic will turn into stone. as an example in this 30 degree weather my extension cords are stiff as a board

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

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