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Linseed oil--preserving lighter/darker shades in wood

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Forum topic by Jumpinjack posted 586 days ago 1123 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jumpinjack

1 post in 586 days


586 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: finishing arts and crafts

Hi,

I’m finishing a small wood project in sapele that has some carved/chiselled elements, leaving lighter shades in the wood that form a pattern.

I’m finishing the wood in boiled linseed oil, which is giving it a really nice, deep colouring, however I’m worried that when I get to the patterned parts on the front it’ll just create a blanket shade of reddish-brown and the pattern will be lost.

Is there a way that I can preserve the lighter parts?

Thank you for ANY help you can give!


7 replies so far

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1557 days


#1 posted 586 days ago

Jumpinjack, although there are some that are going to tell you that BLO will ruin your project, I think it makes a wonderful finish.

Is there a way that you can make a test piece and replicate the pattern so you can test what effect the BLO will have? That would be the best suggestion I could give you.

Good Luck!

-- Mike

View Arminius's profile

Arminius

304 posts in 2408 days


#2 posted 586 days ago

Thin the oil going on those parts a little, and you should see less of a color shift – but definitely try a test pattern first if you can.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15671 posts in 2823 days


#3 posted 586 days ago

Any oil will darken wood to some extent, but the color change should be fairly uniform, so you will still maintain a good contrast between the light and dark areas.

As mentioned, testing would be good if possible.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Stargazer's profile

Stargazer

49 posts in 1545 days


#4 posted 585 days ago

Any oil will darken wood to some extent, but the color change should be fairly uniform, so you will still maintain a good contrast between the light and dark areas.

As mentioned, testing would be good if possible.

^This^

Rick

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1396 posts in 966 days


#5 posted 583 days ago

Your first mistake was using BLO (which is only good for starting fires); your second mistake is thinking of using more BLO. It’ll just make things muddy and darker. The effect you seek can be achieved by spraying a matt or low luster lacquer. Rattle can type will work just fine.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

View lj61673's profile

lj61673

231 posts in 1004 days


#6 posted 583 days ago

Disregard Clint’s post, his ignorance about blo is only exceeded by his willingness to show it. BLO does NOT muddy anything though it will slightly darken while it enhances the grain. It has been used by fine furniture makers and expert woodworkers for many decades. Research it for yourself , educate YOURSELF and don’t rely on some Internet nitwit to guide you.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2449 posts in 956 days


#7 posted 583 days ago

Oil finish will most likely darken the end grain areas of a carved pattern more than the other areas. In that way it can actually accent the carved areas. The question is, if it appeals to you? Only experimentation and experience will tell you.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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