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Need Advice: The New (To Me) Jet JTAS-10XL-1 Cabinet Saw Project

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Forum topic by mnik posted 608 days ago 3442 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


608 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: jet jtas-10xl-1 cabinet saw question table saw bearings motor arbor press bearing puller

Hi everyone,

I been getting back into woodworking more and more, especially since we bought an old house with a finished basement.

Much to my good fortune, my wife hates basements -no matter how nice, and since our laundry’s on the first floor the 500+ sq/ft of finished basement space is now my shop. No more freezing my tail off the garage in January. A real dream come true.

When I started my first major project in the new shop: John White’s ingenious New Fangled Workbench- I began to get more and more irritated with the amount of dust being expelled by my trusty Delta Contractor’s saw. When I was in the garage at the old place it was easier to clean up: just open the bay doors sweep it out. But now that I’m in an enclosed space that’s obviously no longer an option. I have dust collection (a Delta 50-760 with a Wynn cartridge filter) but sealing that base even more of a pain since I’m using the Incra TS-LS fence. So dust collection is pretty much non-existent with my Delta 34-444 contractor’s saw.

Okay, that and the fact I’ve always wanted a real cabinet saw.

So, long story longer, I bought a used Jet JTAS-10XL-1 off Craigslist for $600 this week.

The ad said that bearings were going south but I had pretty much decided I was gonna buy it while I was on my to look at it. Even if the motor was entirely fried it’d still work out for me in the long run as I have a functioning saw already and I could take my time and get a replacement.

When we fired it up it made a loud rough consistent sound. Now my mechanical experience is pretty much nearly nonexistent -but I would assume that bad bearings would give a high-pitched clanking or rattling sound. What I heard sounded more like high-speed friction. Like a pulley against steel in an unfriendly way. If that makes any sense at all.

It was in very good condition otherwise.

But like I said, my mind was made up so I paid him and we loaded her up in the my pickup in the freezing rain without any idea how I was gonna unload when I got home.

So here I am in at my in-laws with the saw still in the bed of my truck in the garage and figuring what’s next on this saw adventure.

I still need to have my electrician install a 220 line in the shop. In the meantime I’ve ordered 2 bearings from VXB. The serial numbers (6203ZZ) were the same and for $3 a pop thought I “why not?”
http://goo.gl/fF2Vs

As it’ll likely be a couple weeks before the electrician makes it over to do the wiring I figured I’d begin by disassembling the saw and replacing any parts that are worn or prone to. This includes the aforementioned bearings. Also, I plan the blow the motor out throughly. I found a small motor repair shop 40 miles away that does work on Jet motors. I hope I don’t have issues re: dust on my hands. http://goo.gl/NJWBi

( So congratulations, you’ve finally made it to the actual questions part of my questions.)

What other parts should I replace while I’m at it? Arbor pulley?
I came across this: http://goo.gl/RelxD

Is it better to bring the arbor assembly to a machine shop to pull out the old ones and press in the new ones or should I buy a cheap bearing puller and press from Harbor Freight?
http://goo.gl/0lsar http://goo.gl/xT3Fo

Any other advice?

Obviously I pretty psyched about this addition to the shop and if I were home right now instead of at the kids grandparents house 600 miles away I’d be in the basement with this thing in pieces instead of writing a long post. But that may be a the best thing after all -taking some time and soliciting what I’m sure will be good advice from you good and knowledgeable people.

Thanks in advance and happy holidays.

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.


25 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112010 posts in 2203 days


#1 posted 608 days ago

Wow sounds like a big job to me.I’m not much of a mechanic so I’m afraid I’m not much help. My solution would be to replace it ,but I know lots of other folks would fix it and do a grand job of bringing it back to good operating condition.
Good luck.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View mnik's profile

mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


#2 posted 608 days ago

Thx Jim. Buddy of mine is quite mechanically adapt, although he’s not a woodworker. Figure if I get in over my head he’ll be happy to laugh while I thrash about. And eventually pitch in.

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5417 posts in 2001 days


#3 posted 607 days ago

It’s more of a sure thing to have a machine shop do the bearings, but it’ll also be more expensive, and not necessarily ”better” than if you do it….just easier. You should be able to isolate the source of the sound by removing the belt and spinning the arbor, then the motor separately.

I’d get some good new belts while you’re at it….high quality cogged rubber belts would be my pick for a cabinet saw with a triple v-belt system.

Get a good blade or two for the new saw….it’ll only cut as well as the blade you put on it. Wax it, align it, get a new insert (ZCI), build a crosscut sled and/or buy a precision miter gauge, and you should be good to go. Enjoy….and post some pics!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View mnik's profile

mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


#4 posted 607 days ago

Thx Knotscott.

Any suggestions where to get those belts?

Will post some photos as soon as I get back home. Think I’ll give that electrician a call to get that 220 line installed ASAP.

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.

View mnik's profile

mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


#5 posted 607 days ago

Goodyear cogged v-belts ordered.

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5417 posts in 2001 days


#6 posted 607 days ago

My suggestion is to get the Goodyear cogged v-belts! ;-)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View mnik's profile

mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


#7 posted 607 days ago

I’ve got Goodyear rubber for my compressor hose and was impressed with the quality. Great minds, etc.

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.

View mnik's profile

mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


#8 posted 600 days ago

I took off the belts and saw this: http://mnik.net/external/setscrews_001.jpg

Yep that’s a missing set screw on the right and what I believe to be a a wrong sized one on the left.
Having discovered the source of the noise problem I’m delighted. The arbor pulley rocks making a clicking sound when turned by hand. When powered up that would surely be the unsettling noise I heard when quickly examining the saw for purchase.

Can anyone confirm that that these screws are not supposed to extend into the channel?
From the looks of it, it appears that someone replaced the set screws -forcing them in. Over time (and probably not much) the one on the right fell out.

I’m deciding if it’s worth the trouble to replace the bearings now or just leave well enough alone. What do folks think?
I’m waiting for my electrician to install the 220 line, so it’s not like I’m in any hurry. What’s more I have a perfectly fine working contractor’s saw. Thoughts appreciated.

Lastly, should I take the motor case off and and blow it out? Or will that just force dust into the bearings and other places it shouldn’t be? Maybe take to to the repair shop and have them do it? I’ve read reports about how these particular motors tend to get caked in dust on the inside. Especially around the capacitor Whatever that is.

Thanks folks. I appreciate it.

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.

View mnik's profile

mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


#9 posted 599 days ago

Two 50 cent set screws from the local hardware store and like that the arbor slippage’s gone. As I mentioned earlier, I am still waiting for my electrician to install the 220 in the basement, so I haven’t powered it up yet. But pretty that’ll take care of the noise I heard during the purchase.

$601 for a nice cabinet saw? Sweet.

The bearings are on their way, but unless it makes noise while running think I’ll leave well enough alone and not change them out.

Will do a thorough cleaning though.

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

514 posts in 661 days


#10 posted 599 days ago

My only question would be whether that “channel” you refer to was actually supposed to have a key in it, and the set screws bear down on that?

View mnik's profile

mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


#11 posted 599 days ago

Underdog, I was wondering the same thing last night. Fortunately the saw’s parts list has the size listed: “SOCKET SET SCREW 1/4-20X3/8” The set screws are pretty recessed into the pulley’s “channel.” As a matter of fact, the ones in the motor pulley are set so deep they’re almost impossible to see even with a flashlight.

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

904 posts in 651 days


#12 posted 599 days ago

The channel, or keyway, probably should have a key. Your hardware store will have them (no need for a Jet brand—they just get their’s at some hardware store). But measure width first, as keys come in different sizes. I had an old Rockwell contractor’s saw (no, they don’t build them the way they used to—thank God). The arbor pulley liked to creep out on the shaft no matter how tightly I drove in the set screw. Fought it for years (it had other issues too), and was so happy to get rid of it. Like a divorce after a disastrous marriage. What a relief.
When you first posted, I immediately suspected the pulley had shifted over just like mine had done. You bearings may be just fine.

View mnik's profile

mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


#13 posted 599 days ago

Thank you Run. Yep. There is a key and keyway: http://mnik.net/external/key.png

I looked and looks like I lucked out: the key’s in there: http://mnik.net/external/key.jpg

I appreciate your help and belated congratulations on your contractor’s saw divorce.

Any thoughts on opening up the motor case and blowing it out?

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.

View mnik's profile

mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


#14 posted 599 days ago

D’oh! Not so fast. I was looking a the wrong pulley in regards to the key and keyway. The arbor shaft keyway is concealed. Seeing as it didn’t rock much more than 1/32” when a loosened the set screws again to suss out the situation, I’ve decided to leave well enough alone and not disassemble the arbor. When I get juice down in the shop we’ll see what she does under power and take it from there.

Moving onto the next problem to solve:

In my hurry to get this beast on to my truck we removed the cast iron table and wings. So, yep, you guessed it. There were factory ring shims a couple of the bolts and I have no idea which a one.

Looks like this may help: http://books.google.com/books?id=s_YDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA33&dq=american%20woodworker%20supertune%20your%20tablesaw&pg=PA30#v=onepage&q&f=false

As well as Grizzly’s manual for it’s 1023s which has a description of the process.

One thing’s for sure, not pleasant reading search results for “leveling table saw” and going through post after post about folks trying to make their saw tables exactly level with the floor (?!).

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.

View mnik's profile

mnik

58 posts in 1159 days


#15 posted 579 days ago

Saw’s up!

http://instagram.com/p/Ur_p5Ji7he/

Also, re: the shim issue as described above: I was able to determine which corners had the shims based on the eroded paint marks in the cabinet base.

-- Yeah, I'm probably over-thinking it. But that's my other hobby.

showing 1 through 15 of 25 replies

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