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Best glue for Marquetry?

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Forum topic by MarkTheFiddler posted 12-20-2012 10:53 PM 4184 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MarkTheFiddler

2053 posts in 1648 days


12-20-2012 10:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question veneering marquetry

Howdy,

Ever since I saw some of Paul’s (ShipWright) marquetry examples, I have been dwelling on them. Artistry, skill craftsmanship. Dwelling on them – yes. Thinking I could possibly do it – NO.

Then, I caught an Episode of woodcarvers. A young lady was doing some marquetry. I’m not saying it looked simple or easy to do. It just looked like something I’d like to try my hand at. Some of the exotic mystery was removed.

I have a few questions:

What is a good glue for joining the veneer figures?
If the veneer is warped, what’s the best way to flatten it?
Is it at all advisable to trim the pieces when they are slightly damp?

I’m guessing tightbond 2 for the glue.
For the warp, I think I should wet the pieces and clamp between 2 boards. Maybe use wax paper of both sides of the veneer. Is there a better method?
When I trimmed a dry piece of veneer last night (across the grain) I got a few splits in the wood on the side I was removing. It makes me think I won’t be able to make thin cuts across the grain. BUT maybe wetting it would take some of the brittleness out of it.

Thank you all so much for any help you can give me.

BTW, I used a $10 coupon at woodcraft and got a variety pack of veneer. 20 sq feet for 21.50 + tax. Nice little variety. Hopefully it’s good enough for the beginner to cut his teeth on.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!


7 replies so far

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Gene Howe

8235 posts in 2888 days


#1 posted 12-20-2012 11:14 PM

Paul will likely chime in. He uses hot hide glue.
As to flattening, I’ve read good reviews of this stuff.
Joe woodworker has a lot of info, too.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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shipwright

7161 posts in 2257 days


#2 posted 12-21-2012 12:25 AM

You’re absolutely right Gene. How could I not chime in.

Lots of people use Tightbond but there’s no question in my mind that hot hide glue has all the advantages for marquetry. I don’t use anything else. PVA glues will work though. I’m no expert on them but it runs in my mind that the plain white stuff can be reversed by heat. It might be the best (Tightbond I ?)

I have two bottles of the stuff Gene is referring to and haven’t ever needed to use them. I’ve never come across a piece of veneer I couldn’t flatten with just water and the press. You don’t want wax paper though. You want newsprint. It will absorb the water that you are trying to remove from the veneer. Hot cauls in a veneer press work really well for this. They speed the process up dramatically.

The tool you need to cut veneer across the grain is really a veneer saw. Knives work and lots of people use them but a veneer saw is much faster and doesn’t have the same tendency to tear splinters off the trailing edge of the veneer. They also are less likely to follow the grain off line in cutting with the grain.
Another tip here is that the piece you are intending to use should be under the straight edge when cutting. That way if it does tear out at the end, it will be in the scrap piece.

Edit:  … Trim Veneer dry. Wetting is to be avoided except when absolutely necessary.

Hope this helps.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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MarkTheFiddler

2053 posts in 1648 days


#3 posted 12-21-2012 01:44 PM

Gene and Paul,

Thank you very much. You guys are awesome. I didn’t do any glue ups last night. I’ll try to find the hide glue today. As for the veneer saw, I never heard of such a thing. I’m pretty sure I’ll be looking for one. I wasted a few pieces last night and although it was just a couple of tiny pieces, it was more about the wasted time.

I am so slow at this. I got a couple of gaps that I’m going to live with this time. I have so much cutting to do on this project that I think I’ll be much better at it by the time I’m finished. It would be easier to start and finish a new one than to correct every sliver of my first attempts.

Last thing, I can’t sit and watch tv. I have to be doing something. Marquetry allows me to be with the family while doing something that can be beautiful.

Paul – thank you for my initial exposure.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

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shipwright

7161 posts in 2257 days


#4 posted 12-21-2012 02:40 PM

This is the one I have. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/Search.aspx?action=n
It’s not the best veneer saw but it gets the job done until I can find an old French one.
Sounds like you are working with a knife, not something I’ve done much of but check out Dennis Zongker’s blog here

Good luck.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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MarkTheFiddler

2053 posts in 1648 days


#5 posted 12-22-2012 01:16 AM

Thank you Paul. I wondered what kind of saw could possibly do the job. 50 TPI oughtt to do it. Wow is that ever fine.

I really appreciate the links. There won’t be any beautiful close up of my first marquetry projects. I’ll make sure the images have low resolution so folk can’t zoom in. I still like the way it’s turning out.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

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shipwright

7161 posts in 2257 days


#6 posted 12-22-2012 01:28 AM

Gotta start somewhere Mark.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2793 days


#7 posted 01-19-2013 12:21 PM

Hi Mark. I understand that Europeans use mainly knives for their marquetry because their standard veneers are thinner and easier to cut with a knife, while the American standard has been thicker veneers, making it more comfortable to use saws. I’m not sure this is still the case, but that’s how the difference started. Of course the French have been using saws for a long time, but I think this is mainly due to them sawing several layers at once in packets on the Chevalet.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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