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Snipe on short pieces w/ the DW735x

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Forum topic by Marcus posted 610 days ago 1084 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marcus

1041 posts in 646 days


610 days ago

I’ve always been a bit disappointed on the amount of snipe I get on my DW735x even with the extension tables installed. Usually I can put a little upward pressure on the board going in and out of the planer to alleviate most of it. The problem I am having now is that I’ve started planing a few shorter pieces, 18-24” or so it makes it difficult to do the pushing up work around.

Is there some sort of other setup variables I should be looking at that might alleviate snipe that I should look into?


15 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2275 days


#1 posted 610 days ago

unfortunately that’s the physics of the planer, and with shorter pieces you WILL get snipe.

you could work around it by gluing 2 longer strips on both sides of the short board , then running that through the planer. the longer strips will maintain proper contact with the rollers and will control the snipe on the shorter “middle” piece you are planing.

it does take an extra few steps though, but if you are stuck with shorter pieces to work with, this is a good alternative.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3404 posts in 2587 days


#2 posted 610 days ago

Use a “slave” board and double sided tape.
I do it a lot with my 733.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

6821 posts in 1310 days


#3 posted 610 days ago

Start with a”scrap’ board. As soon as the roller starts the board through, start a good board. At the end of each run of good boards, be sure to run another scrap board. That way, all the snipe gets snipped into the scrap.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Marcus's profile

Marcus

1041 posts in 646 days


#4 posted 610 days ago

Well, glad to hear I am not alone at least.

A question for you about the slave board Bill. Do you put up pressure on the in/out feed of the board as well? Or is the extra contract w/ the planer bed enough to keep it from tipping and so its planed as if it was the middle of a long board?

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2866 posts in 1114 days


#5 posted 610 days ago

Doesn’t the 735 have a head lock like the Delta 22-580?

I have the Delta and once I lock the head at a given depth there is no snipe.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3157 posts in 633 days


#6 posted 610 days ago

I have found that if I take TINY cuts, the snipe issue is almost gone. It takes quite a bit longer to get the piece planed, but it seems to be working forme.

And no, the 735 doesnt have the head lock. I belivie it’s the 734 that has it.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1278 posts in 2363 days


#7 posted 610 days ago

I used a brand new 735 all last summer and never had any problems with snipe. I was very please with the planer. It could be the feed rollers are exerting too much pressure and need to lightened up a bit.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View Marcus's profile

Marcus

1041 posts in 646 days


#8 posted 610 days ago

I barely can take more than 1/32 off without getting snipe with my planer. I’ve also had issues with it moving from the set height. Maybe I have a dud.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2275 days


#9 posted 610 days ago

the 735 doesnt have a headlock because with it’s 4 post design it doesn’t need to lock the head (it’s sort of automatically done by the columns). the problem with the snipe in this case isn’t the cutterhead, but the rollers – since the pieces are short, they are only being supported by 1 of the rollers which tilts the parts into the cutterhead resulting in snipe. this would happen on any other planer as well regardless of how small of a bite you setup the planer to take. the solution is to use buddy-boards that will maintain proper pressure against both rollers (can be glued, tacked, or screwed to your good board, although only gluing will keep it from having left over holes.

the part about your planer moving from set height is an all different issue…

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Marcus's profile

Marcus

1041 posts in 646 days


#10 posted 610 days ago

I just got off the phone w/ Dewalt. They suggested taking it back and exchange it since its under 90 days old. They were pretty adamant that I had a dud and there is no reason I should be having the issues I have. Great service at least, hopefully the replacement will work out better.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2866 posts in 1114 days


#11 posted 610 days ago

Purplev,
The Delta has the 4 post design and when you lock the head the rollers no longer spring up or down, they are locked in place.
That means the tension on the board is equalized on both the top and the bottom so it won’t lift or lower as it goes through.

I often run short pieces 16” or less through with no snipe whatsoever.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View derosa's profile

derosa

1533 posts in 1462 days


#12 posted 610 days ago

if the board isn’t too wide I find sending it through at an angle can help stop the snipe. Not certain why a corner hitting first would get snipe on the corner but it almost never does. Upside is it also seems to reduce tear out on more figured wood.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View Sirgreggins's profile

Sirgreggins

292 posts in 862 days


#13 posted 544 days ago

I just got a 735 slightly used and i love it. Especially b/c it’s my first planer. Quick question though: when planing short boards, can’t you use a long piece of scrap and feed that in first, then put your short pieces in while the long scrap is still being fed to reduce snipe?

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

13269 posts in 1302 days


#14 posted 544 days ago

Sirgreggins,
YES. That is the buddy board someone mentioned earlier. The buddy board should be long enough to engage the rollers during infeed & outfeed of the workpiece.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View Sirgreggins's profile

Sirgreggins

292 posts in 862 days


#15 posted 544 days ago

sweet. i’m still a newbie to woodworking. i guess i thought a buddy board was something else. i’m gonna give that a try.

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