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Forum topic by rf58 posted 12-20-2012 05:16 AM 714 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rf58

57 posts in 1897 days


12-20-2012 05:16 AM

what do they do to the laminated oad boards
it seems like it is compressed don’t take a stain very well
does anyone know what they do to that wood. the glue up is great and grain match is ok.but there is something about it ,

-- rf58, Illinois


6 replies so far

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Tedster

2271 posts in 898 days


#1 posted 12-20-2012 05:43 AM

Did you sand it first? Sometimes a very thin invisible layer of sap will harden, like varnish, slightly sealing the grain. It’s not just Menard’s oak, but all woods do this to an extent. That’s why surfaces that have been exposed for any period of time should be sanded before staining. Any pre-surfaced lumber you buy should be sanded for this reason, and also to get rid of the chatter marks, which you might not see until you apply a finish. I usually go over everything with 150 grit. This also applies to any wood you’ve had sitting around for a while.

-- I support the 28th Amendment. http://www.wolf-pac.com/28th

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rf58

57 posts in 1897 days


#2 posted 12-20-2012 04:08 PM

i have a piece left i will sand it deeper but i did roundover the edge and didn’t notice any difference
will try it.

-- rf58, Illinois

View REO's profile

REO

626 posts in 761 days


#3 posted 12-20-2012 08:40 PM

teds got a good point. if they finished with a sander it most likely burnished the dust into the pores with the heat. if it is a planed board the same thing can happen. the edge has worn to the point that the edge burnishes the material behind the cutting edge.
be sure to sand with the grain prior to finishing.

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Tedster

2271 posts in 898 days


#4 posted 12-20-2012 09:00 PM

The roundover edge would have shown a difference if the issue was limited to the surface, so apparently it’s not just the surface but the wood itself. Maybe they are foresting genetically modified oak, made to grow faster? Just a wild guess. Or maybe it’s a particular species of oak.

by the way, are you sure it’s red oak and not white oak? White oak is less porous and will stain differently from red oak. Just a thought.

-- I support the 28th Amendment. http://www.wolf-pac.com/28th

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rf58

57 posts in 1897 days


#5 posted 12-21-2012 01:43 AM

IM GOING T RIP A PICE 1’’ WIDE AND SEE HOW IT FINISHES.
IM POSITIVE IT IS WHITE OAK YOU KNOW HOW YOU CAN TELL WHITE OAK FRMO RED OAK?**

-- rf58, Illinois

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rf58

57 posts in 1897 days


#6 posted 12-21-2012 02:07 AM

I JUST TOOK IT FOR GATIT IT WAS WHITE OAK BUT IT IS RED OAK
YOU CAN BLOW BUBBLES IN A GLASS OF WATER WITH A 3/4 X3/4 STICK OF RED OAK NOT WHITE OAK.

IT SAYS MAIDE IN AMERRICA I JUST COATED A RAW CUT AND A FACTORY FINISHED PIECE WITH SHELLAC

-- rf58, Illinois

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